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Cosmic Tumblers — Tony Ludlow, 4/18/2018

Apr. 18th 2018

field-of-dreams-2

The first book that I ever read was a book about running. Well, maybe not technically. But the very first sentence I ever read was about running.

“See Tom run.”

That was the first sentence I ever read in my life.

Running — pure running that wasn’t associated with some sport I was playing — has been a part of my life since I was 18. I’ve been running ever since. I started coaching other runners in 1981.

Huffpost Healthy Living recently posted an article entitled “19 Reasons to Start Running.” None of those 19 reasons were anything new to me, and if you’re a runner they wouldn’t be news to you either. I like the list. It’s a good one. But there’s nothing on that list that runners don’t already know. The experience of years leads to that kind of knowledge.

I started keeping journals of my running and weight training workouts beginning in 1977. By 1998, I’d written in and filled up 12 journals covering 20 years of weight workout diary notes; running workouts, running notes, and race results; triathlon training, triathlon notes, and race results. My journals included nutrition experiments, equipment analysis, training ideas, trial and error approaches, and everything else you could imagine that covered my personal athletic and fitness journey.

When my shipment from Japan arrived here in Memphis in 1998, guess what was missing?

I was devastated.

The journals, along with all of that knowledge, experience, and wisdom gained over two decades were lost, along with everything else in that box. The written journals were lost, but the knowledge, hopefully, remains. One of the things in journal #2 was the list of lessons learned from my first triathlon. Seven lessons, actually.

Today’s installment will only highlight the 7th lesson, and one that has been an encouragement to me since the day I learned it: July 22, 1980, when the sport was so new I had to explain the details of it to all my friends.

As we join our story, yours truly has come to the last mile of the last leg of the race, an 8-mile run. The run followed a 1-mile swim and a 35-mile bike race. The run, like the bike leg, was up and down horrible hills that seemed to have no end.

The finish line was on a horse racing track inside a county fairground. Runners entered the fairgrounds, ran onto the track, and took one lap around the track to the finish. So, with “Rocky,” “Chariots of Fire,” and “Eye of the Tiger” blaring from the big speakers set up in the infield, I entered the horse racing track and tried to pick up the pace a bit. I wanted to finish strong.

With about 150 yards to go, I started hearing a wheezing gasping sound from someone behind me. They were obviously in distress. “Good lord, someone’s dying back there,” I thought. But the thing was, the dying sound was getting closer!

WHAT???? How could this be? How was the dying guy gaining on me???? “Inconceivable!” I thought, in my best “Princess Bride” voice.

With about 100 yards left in the race, the “dying guy,” … with the gray hair, passed me. HE PASSED ME! I tried to keep up with him. I tried to stay near him. But I was spent. He wasn’t.

The old dude beat me!

Although I crossed the finish line, proud of my first triathlon, I was a bit miffed about the old dude. After all, I was only 3 days from my 23rd birthday and the very idea of some ancient mariner passing me was messing with my head. My finish time was respectable, not bad at all. But post-race, all I could think of was finding that decrepit dude.

You know how people linger after races around the refreshment area, eating free snacks and gulping down Gatorade? That’s where I found the gray-haired gentleman (aka “the dying dude”) eating a banana.

“Congratulations on a great race!” I said to the man who humbled me.

“Oh, thanks,” he said with a smile, kind of embarrassed.

“That was ME you passed right there at the end!” I said.

“Oh, sorry ’bout that,” he said with a smile that said he wasn’t sorry at all. And then he added, “I hope you’ll forgive me.”

“Sir, I hope you won’t be offended by my question … but, I have to ask … how old are you, if you don’t mind me asking?”

Sticking his chest out with satisfaction, he said, “I’m 65 years old!”

“You, sir, are my new role model … my goal … my HERO!!!”

And this unknown 65-year-old man has been my hero ever since.

Seventh Life Lesson from First Triathlon: “It’s not about age either.”

I’m now closer to that gentleman’s age than I’ve ever been. Last year, I entered my 60s! An age I own with pleasure! If I hadn’t met him, maybe I wouldn’t have tried to be like him my whole life! At 23, I lived in a world of young Marines, bullet-proof and badass, in a society that glorified being young. That man was the first athlete I ever met who was older than 30. It’s not hyperbole or a storyteller’s exaggeration to say that I decided right then and there, on that day, July 22, 1980, at that very moment to live my life like that man was living his.

Sometimes, life can turn in an instant. Over a casual conversation. An encounter that probably left that gentleman’s memory within hours, changed my life and has stuck with me for a lifetime.

And those moments, those spontaneous and unremarkable moments, can alter a life. And you’re never too old or “too far out of the race” to have those moments! I had one of those conversations with one of my professors just a couple of weeks ago. A casual conversation that put parts of my thinking and planning, that had been foggy, into sharp focus!

As Ferris Bueller famously said, six years after my encounter with that 65-year-old-bad-ass, “Life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.”

And while I’m quoting 80s movies, here’s this one from one of my favorites of all time, “Field of Dreams,” when Ray Kinsella, played by Kevin Costner, says, “There comes a time when all the cosmic tumblers have clicked into place … and the universe opens itself up for a few seconds … to show you what’s possible.”

Those things I learned in my first triathlon have been true in my life and not just about triathlon. It shattered many of my misplaced notions and prejudices born out of youth and inexperience. It helped to realign my thinking about things. They were not exactly the lessons I thought I would learn, but it was proof that one of the cool things about life and about sport is that we can continue to grow and learn and evolve, with or without the humble pie!

— 30 —

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TODAY’S NUTRITION TALK
by Sergeant Major Ashley Holloway, M.S., Registered Dietitian, LDN

(A Registered Dietitian has a BS in Food Science, followed by a one year internship through an accredited university, and then with the recommendation of the internship program’s supervisor, a national examination is required. After that, an RD must have continuing education units annually in order to remain active and registered. An RD is an expert, not a hobbyist or a “food enthusiast.”)

Hot! Hot! Hot!

The temperature and humidity will arrive SOON! Despite the current situation!

This increases your risk of dehydration and even life threatening hypernatremia if you exercise in the Memphis heat. But just how much and what kind of fluid should you be taking in?

For those shorter runs and for some general hot-weather fluid tips, try these tips adapted from the American College of Sports Medicine guidelines:

Before exercise: Try to drink plenty of fluids in the 24 hours before your planned exercise session and then drink two or more cups of fluid two to three hours before exercise. This will help keep you hydrated while allowing your body time to get rid of any excess fluid before your exercise session begins.

During exercise: Drink 6 to 12 ounces of cool fluids (water is fine) every 15 to 20 minutes. If your exercise session or run is less than an hour, a sports drink is not needed. These drinks contain calories, many up to 200 a bottle and can add to weight gain if they aren’t counted.

If, however, you are to be exercising longer than 60 minutes, you will definitely benefit from the extra sugar/carbohydrates and electrolytes from a sports drink. The carbohydrates help to fuel your muscles and the electrolytes, especially sodium and potassium, reduce urine output, speed the rate at which fluids empty the stomach, promote absorption from the small intestine, and encourage fluid retention.

After exercise: Be sure to continue drinking after your exercise session is over. You can weigh yourself before and after your runs. Try to drink about 24 ounces of fluid for every pound lost. Don’t forget to include some sodium (salt) either in fluids or with the post- exercise meal. Sodium can help in the rehydration process and increase your desire to drink.

If you are curious to see just how much fluid you really need when you exercise, then be sure to check out the USA Track and Field’s Self Testing Program for Optimal Hydration. This test uses a formula to determine how much fluid you need based on your weight, the weather conditions and your exercise intensity. You can find this self-test at:
http://www.usatf.org/groups/Coaches/library/2007/hydration/USATFSelfTestingProgramForOptimalHydration.pdf

Knowing how much fluid you need is just as important as being fitted with the right running shoes or following the perfect training program. Too little or too much fluid can have serious, even life-threatening consequences. Be sure you know how to properly hydrate by following the above guidelines and by following your thirst.

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Patreon

Through the years—almost 19 now—folks have been super supportive of USMC Fitness Boot Camp and all that I do through it.

Weekly, I hear from former boot campers who’ve moved away. They write saying how significant the program was to them, how much they miss it, and how much they enjoy getting the newsletters and Facebook updates.

Sometimes, those who’ve moved away send money because they want to be helpful and to support the program. This happened just a few days ago. Sometimes these folks know that at any point in time, there are about half a dozen boot campers coming for free because they lost their job, or there’s been some other detrimental change in their finances and they’d have to drop out boot camp.

We’re the only fitness company in Memphis that allows members to continue to participate for free if they lose their jobs or their finances take a horrible hit. And when they’re back on their feet, they just start paying from that point forward. The months they came for free never have to be paid back.

I consider what I do to be more ministry than business, and don’t kick anyone out because of money problems.

Like you, I support different causes and organizations in Memphis just because I believe in what they do and want to help them keep doing it. Monthly, I support 8 different local entities, including WKNO and Literacy Mid-South.

Additionally, last year I started supporting two different people on a site called Patreon. It’s a way to support artists, musicians, writers, instructors, and others who produce content or provide services of a broad nature but might not be able to continue doing so without financial support from patrons … like how educators, artists, musicians, and others were supported by patrons back in the day.

I’ve been encouraged to join Patreon myself, giving folks an opportunity to support the program in small automatic monthly amounts.

Check out the page and if you feel led to support the work I do, even if it’s $1 a month, the number of patrons will be an encouragement to me and others!

https://www.patreon.com/TonyLudlow/overview

Thank you so much!

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80% OF YOUR WEIGHT LOSS SUCCESS HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH EXERCISE!

But 80% of your HEALTH and WELLNESS DO!

And 100% of your FUNCTIONAL FITNESS AND CAPABILITIES ARE DIRECTLY TIED TO EXERCISE!

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DO YOU USE VENMO?

If you’d like to pay using VENMO, you may! I’m Tony Ludlow on VENMO!

If you’re unfamiliar with VENMO, it’s a payment app for your phone (or computer) owned by PayPal and functions like a check. You can LITERALLY make a payment on your phone in less time than it takes to fill out a check! Click, click, click, done! All done!

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Have a GREAT day!

Yours in good health and fitness!

Sgt. Tony

Posted by Tony Ludlow | in Uncategorized | No Comments »


A Perfect 10 — Tony Ludlow, blog post for 4/11/2018

Apr. 11th 2018

SN-FEA-POOL-01-7-11_t600

After reading a recent essay I wrote, a friend of many years said, “Tony, I think I’ve heard most of your stories, (he hasn’t … I haven’t even told half my stories!) but I don’t think I’d ever heard that one.”

By most accounts, some of you have heard this particular story. In fact, several of you tell me it’s your favorite story.

Bless your hearts. Thank you for that!

I shared this tale with a new friend the other day. She was also a swimmer and diver in high school. And since she thought it … amusing, I share it again. A humiliating story from the annals of yours truly.

Allow me to set the scene.

Imagine, if you will, you’re sitting in the aquatic center at the University of Arkansas. You’re watching the State Swimming and Diving Meet. It is the senior year of this story teller’s high school adventure.

As we join our story, yours truly is standing on the diving board, preparing to perform his tenth and final dive of the state meet. (I never know if I should capitalize that or not: State Meet?)

Anyway.

I stood there, suspecting that fame was in my grasp.

But it wasn’t the kind of fame that comes from doing something awesome. This kind of fame was about to be acquired by doing something dreadful.

This is what happened.

In addition to being an unremarkable swimmer on my high school swim team, I was also a slightly average diver. I came by this perishable skill through the help of one of my brother’s friends, Paul. Paul had been a diver in college and took me under his wing during the summer between my 7th and 8th grade. That summer I went from doing “cannonballs” and “can openers” to doing “inward 1 ½ somersaults” and “reverse double somersaults.” Learning those kinds of dives required me to wear a sweatshirt to practice in. I landed on my back and my belly a lot.

Fast forward from that summer to the State Swimming and Diving Meet. And now picture me in the finals of the state diving competition. In fact, as we turn our attention back to that meet, our hero (Tony Ludlow), is actually in SECOND PLACE (pure luck, I assure you!) … with only one more dive to go!

The guy in first place was mathematically untouchable. None of us were going to catch him. Second place was going to be GREAT though! My previous dives had gone pretty well and I’d practiced this last dive several times that morning. The dive was a reverse 2 ½ somersault, degree of difficulty: 2.8.

And there I was, standing on the board, preparing my thoughts and getting myself ready. If you’ve watched diving on television, you’ve no doubt seen divers do this many times.

Diving is a pretty standard solitary sport. It’s not easy, mind you. But no one is playing defense against you, trying to keep you from doing the dive. There’s no adversary trying to trip you up. No one is trash-talking you from the stands. In point of fact, everyone is quiet when you dive.

The diver stands on the springboard ten feet or so from the end of the board in mental preparation. Then when he or she is ready, the diver strides forward, leaps straight up into the air (called the hurdle), and comes down on the end of the board. Then the board flexes, and the diver rides it into the air and performs the dive.

So, there I stood, like I’d done a hundred times before. Nothing unusual at all … until something happened.

For reasons I can’t explain, I became painfully aware of everyone waiting on me to dive.

There were hundreds of people in the aquatic center that day. All of my teammates were there. My girlfriend was there. Friends from school were there. All of the other teams from around the state were there. The other team’s friends and families were there. The other team’s coaches, officials, and judges were there. The place was packed.

And everyone was waiting on me. All of those people … waiting.

On me.

And all of those people were being quiet.

For me.

And all of those people silent so I could concentrate.

Everyone was looking at me.

And waiting on me.

To do something.

But there I stood.

Doing nothing.

No one was whispering. No one was standing up. No one was moving at all. I could feel everyone leaning forward, holding their collective breath waiting for me.

This crowd of people had been simple background noise, scenery with no consequence to me during the whole swim meet. I never paid them any attention. But now … all of a sudden … for reasons I can’t explain … there they were! They’d materialized in my consciousness like they’d been beamed there by the USS Enterprise, NCC 1701.

One minute they weren’t there, and then in the blink of an eye, there they were.

And that crowd of people was all I could think about.

Eventually you have to do something. You can’t just stand on the diving board forever. I don’t actually know if there’s a time limit, like a shot-clock, where you MUST go. But I didn’t want some referee or umpire to jump up and blow a whistle or throw a flag for delay of game. I didn’t want to be ordered to dive.

And I could feel everyone becoming anxious. Whatever the usual time for gathering my wits was allowed, I felt I’d probably exceeded it. The crowd’s anxiety was rising. My not doing something was making them uncomfortable. I had to move. I had to do something.

I thought maybe once my feet started moving forward everything would fall into place. It would become rote. It would just happen!

It didn’t.

But I continued moving forward anyway, praying for inspiration! I jumped up into the air — as seen on TV — came down on the end of the board, as seen on TV … and instead of taking off into the air and performing the dive, as seen on TV … I froze on the end of the board. I mean I FROZE there!

“Boinngggggggggggggggggggg,” went the diving board and it bounced up and down with me on the end of it riding it up and down with bent knees, looking more ridiculous than I have the ability to explain. Imagine the most absurd scene you can conjure and then double it.

And there I was. NOT DIVING.

You could hear the collective sound of everyone in that place gasp. They sucked the air out of the building, making that “OOOHHHH!!!” sound as they inhaled all of the oxygen, followed by the “ohhhhhhh no” whisper that was an exhale.

“Nononononono!” I said to myself.

In that situation, there is nowhere to hide. You’re completely exposed! Standing on the end of a 3 meter board in a swimsuit skimpier than your underwear, there’s nothing to hide behind. AND, you’ve just done something no other diver had done during the two-day meet … or EVER! And ALL EYES are upon you.

Time suspended and every second passed like an hour.

I heard the head judge say into the microphone, “BALK!” But he said that in slow motion, like you’re playing a song at half speed.

Yes, that’s right. They called “balk,” just like in baseball. That’s what it’s called when a diver fails to “take off!” No one in the aqua-center at the University of Arkansas had ever heard the judge say that because no one had ever seen what I had just done. I had never seen what I had just done! Or not done, as the case was.

What happens next?

I wasn’t even sure. I was ready to just jump in and do a cannonball or a can opener and splash the judges. But I didn’t.

According to the rules, the diver can back up, regroup, and do the dive. Unfortunately, the diver will only be awarded HALF the points he’d have gotten. So, a dive that would’ve scored 50, would only be awarded 25 points.

Just like that, second place was gone.

I backed up, regrouped, and took my spot on the board again. Waited for the judge to indicate that they were ready for me to dive. Got the signal. And …

With EVERYONE in the place leaning forward and watching my every move …

Nothing.

I was 17 years old and having the worst day of my entire life in front of a crowd of people … and I was doing it practically naked. I could literally FEEL the people sitting on the edge of their seats, waiting for me to dive, willing me down the board and into the air.

I thought maybe THIS time it would work. I’ll just start my approach … go into the hurdle … come down on the board and it would happen. It’ll be magic!

It was a disaster.

The exact same thing happened. With me planted on the end of the board like a 5-year-old afraid to jump. And again, the collective and horrified inhale and exhale of the crowd. And it all happened in slow motion in my mind.

“SCRATCH DIVE,” announced the judge soberly.

What happens next?

I’ll tell you what happens next.

The ultimate walk of shame is what happens next. I had to walk back to the other end of the board and climb down the ladder. Once I got down the ladder I had to walk the entire length of the pool and in front of the stands where everyone was looking at me.

Funeral homes have more fun and excitement than that place as I walked. I was looking down at my feet the whole time, not wanting to make eye contact with anyone. I could hear the sounds of people murmuring and the sounds of teenage girls giggling.

I walked toward my team’s bench and glanced up just enough to see my coach having a meltdown. His face was bright red and his teeth were clinched. I could see the veins in his temple and neck. He threw a towel to me. Actually, I think he threw the towel AT me. I caught it, put the towel over my head, and just kept walking. I walked past the bench where all of my teammates sat … all the way into the locker room. And there I sat for the next 5 years. Or so it seemed.

The next day there was a tiny headline buried on the 5th page of the sports section of my hometown newspaper that said, “Local Diver Comes in Ninth in State Meet.” (Do you know that they actually HAVE a ribbon for 9th place!) I went from 2nd out of 14 to 9th in the most epic fail known to man … That’s how I felt.

The next week at school I was met in the hallway by my worthless friends mocking my shame with “BalkBalkBalkBalkBalk” … sort of like how someone imitates a chicken clucking. Like how that camel in the GEICO commercial who said, “MikeMikeMikeMike, guess what day it is?”

I had no focus on the board that day. I became distracted. I thought of everything else but what was important. If I had blocked out everything else and concentrated on the main thing, I’d have taken home a trophy and a title instead of that little pathetic 9th place ribbon. If I had put my energies into the dive instead of the distraction, the headline would have read differently and might have been on the front page of the sports section.

I’ve learned since then how not to choke.

How do you stand up in front of the world and perform? How do you walk into a situation with the potential for embarrassment and humiliation and not choke and stumble? How do you nail that interview, that speech, that presentation, that meeting with the boss, that blind date?

In a word, breathe and relax. Get control over your breathing because you’ve probably started breathing shallow. When you’re tense you breathe shallow and your whole body gets tense. And the more tense you get, the more tense you get.

Concentrate on your breathing.
Slow your breathing down and breathe deeply.
Relax.
Breathe deeply.
Focus.
Breathe deeply.
Smile (hard to be tense with a smile on your face).
Tell yourself something funny or obscene!
And then tell yourself that you can do it! You can do it! You can do it!

Choke prevention from Tony Ludlow

You’re welcome!

— 30 —

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Patreon

Through the years—almost 19 now—folks have been super supportive of USMC Fitness Boot Camp and all that I do through it.

Weekly, I hear from former boot campers who’ve moved away. They write saying how significant the program was to them, how much they miss it, and how much they enjoy getting the newsletters and Facebook updates.

Sometimes, those who’ve moved away send money because they want to be helpful and to support the program. This happened just a few days ago. Sometimes these folks know that at any point in time, there are about half a dozen boot campers coming for free because they lost their job, or there’s been some other detrimental change in their finances and they’d have to drop out boot camp.

We’re the only fitness company in Memphis that allows members to continue to participate for free if they lose their jobs or their finances take a horrible hit. And when they’re back on their feet, they just start paying from that point forward. The months they came for free never have to be paid back.

I consider what I do to be more ministry than business, and don’t kick anyone out because of money problems.

Like you, I support different causes and organizations in Memphis just because I believe in what they do and want to help them keep doing it. Monthly, I support 8 different local entities, including WKNO and Literacy Mid-South.

Additionally, last year I started supporting two different people on a site called Patreon. It’s a way to support artists, musicians, writers, instructors, and others who produce content or provide services of a broad nature but might not be able to continue doing so without financial support from patrons … like how educators, artists, musicians, and others were supported by patrons back in the day.

I’ve been encouraged to join Patreon myself, giving folks an opportunity to support the program in small automatic monthly amounts.

Check out the page and if you feel led to support the work I do, even if it’s $1 a month, the number of patrons will be an encouragement to me and others!

https://www.patreon.com/TonyLudlow/overview

Thank you so much!

———————————————————

80% OF YOUR WEIGHT LOSS SUCCESS HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH EXERCISE!

——————————————————

DO YOU USE VENMO?

If you’d like to pay using VENMO, you may! I’m Tony Ludlow on VENMO!

If you’re unfamiliar with VENMO, it’s a payment app for your phone (or computer) owned by PayPal and functions like a check. You can LITERALLY make a payment on your phone in less time than it takes to fill out a check! Click, click, click, done! All done!

——————————————————

TODAY’S NUTRITION TALK
by Sergeant Major Ashley Holloway, Registered Dietitian, LDN

(A Registered Dietitian has a BS in Food Science, followed by a one-year internship through an accredited university, and then with the recommendation of the internship program’s supervisor, a national examination is required. After that, an RD must have continuing education units annually in order to remain active and registered. An RD is an expert, not a hobbyist or a “food enthusiast.”)

The meat section at the grocery store can sometimes be a little overwhelming. There are so many cuts to choose from and then they are all labeled with different terms like “choice” or “prime.” How do you know what to choose? Hopefully the information below will help sort out some of the confusion.

For most types of meat, the more fat that is on and in the meat, means more flavor. The less fat and marbling (the white streaks of fat throughout the meat) of the meat means it is less tender and less flavor.

The meat we see in the stores all meets safety standards set by the The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It is all then graded and labeled as either USDA Prime, USDA Choice, or USDA Select. These grades are not based on nutrition, but instead are based on juiciness, flavor, and texture. “Prime” is considered the best quality, is the fattiest, has lots of marbling throughout, is tender, and is full of flavor. The next best is considered “Choice” which are still
high quality cuts of meat, but are leaner with less marbling. “Select” cuts are the leanest of the bunch with little to no marbling.

If you are cooking a steak and are looking for tenderness, juiciness, and flavor, I would choose a “Prime” cut. If I am making a stew that has a lot of seasoning and is cooked over low heat for a long period of time, I would go with the “select” cut. It is less expensive and will become more tender with the slow cooking process and more flavorful with the seasoning of the stew.

When choosing ground meat, the numbers represent the amount of lean versus the amount of fat in the meat. For instance, and meat that is 80/20 is 80% lean and 20% fat by weight and 90/10 is 90% lean and 10% fat. The more fat usually means more flavor and juiciness. The higher the fat content the higher the calorie level too. The advice for consuming is the same for whole pieces of meat. If you are mixing it into a flavorful dish, leaner may be a great choice
because of less calories and total fat, but if you are wanting a super juicy burger, higher fat ground meat would be your go to.

It is important to note that often ground turkey isn’t always the better choice then extra lean ground beef. In regular ground turkey it can contain dark and white meat and even skin and fat. This can increase the calories and fat content. On the other hand, ground turkey breast, which is the white meat only, is fairly lean. But in a side by side comparison, the leanest ground beef
still comes out on top in regard to grams of total protein and the mineral content.

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MAKE A FACE!!!!

INCREASE YOUR WEIGHTS!

YOU GET OUT WHAT YOU PUT IN!

What you get out of the workouts is determined by you.

How much do you work? How much effort you put into trying to do all of the repetitions with proper form and how much weight you’re using will determine what you get out of each workout.

YOU DETERMINE WHETHER YOUR WORKOUT IS HALF-ASS OR KICKASS!

It’s time for you to go up in weights … that’s what I’m thinking!

MAKING A FACE (THE GRIMACE) IS THE POOR MAN’S (OR WOMAN’S) FACELIFT!

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EVERY WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY ARE T-SHIRT DAY!

WEAR YOUR RANK INSIGNIA SHIRT, SUB 7 SHIRT, OR OTHER USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP SHIRT EVERY WEDNESDAY!

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Have a GREAT day!

Yours in good health and fitness!

Sgt. Tony

Posted by Tony Ludlow | in Uncategorized | No Comments »


But I just looked around … and he’s gone.

Apr. 4th 2018

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My grandfather—my “Big Dad”—taught me things that would have equipped me for his world, his generation. But didn’t really help me much for the one I would be in. Much of what he taught me disappeared in polite society along him:

• Hats worn with suits,
• Walking on the outside, closest to the street, when with a lady,
• Hand-written thank you notes,
• Opening doors for ladies,
• Standing when a lady enters the room,
• Taking off your hat when speaking to a lady or someone older,
• Taking off your sunglasses when speaking to a lady or someone older,
• Giving up your seat on a train or bus for a lady or an adult,
• Asking permission to leave the Table,
• Saying “may I have,” not “I want,”
• Addressing all men and women with “sir” and “ma’am,”
• Addressing older men and women as “Mr. Smith” or “Mrs. Jones.”

How do we measure others today? How do we measure a man? A woman?

Wasn’t it character?

Isn’t it character?

Shouldn’t it be character?

In 9th grade, I started keeping a notebook of the quotes of great people in history. After I filled it, I carried it with me all over the world. It was lost in a box that never made it from Japan back to Memphis in 1998. I imagine that box fell off the cargo ship in the Pacific and washed up on Tom Hanks’ little island.

The quotes of great people inspire and inform us, don’t they?

Martin Luther King said, “The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.”

Plato said, “The measure of a man is what he does with power.”

J.C. Watts said, “The measure of a man is not how great his faith is, but how great his love is.”

Plutarch said, “The measure of a man is the way he bears up under misfortune.”

“The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can’t help him.”

One way to measure a man, or a woman, is by what kinds of things irritate them.

Or moves them.

Or breaks them.

I nostalgically hold on to the things my Big Dad taught me. When he came to visit us from Little Rock, he slept with me in my room. In the darkness I asked him questions I was too afraid to ask my parents or even my teachers. “When will I be a grown man?” “Do you ever get scared?” “What is death?” “How can I be brave?” “What do I do when my heart is broken?”

He taught me to look for greatness in others and to try to use their example to shape my own life.

In the darkness of my bedroom on the night of April 4, 1968, I asked my Big Dad, a man of noble character, why the negro man was killed in Memphis. There was a long pause from my grandfather, V.W. Lancaster. A pause so long that I thought perhaps he’d fallen asleep.

And then he sighed.

I thought at first the sigh was an indication that I’d finally asked him too many questions. That he was tired of the nightly inquisition. That I’d exasperated him to the point of fatigue and irritation.

He had never tired of my questions before. Had never shown any sign of agitation from them. But now I seem to have asked one too many of them. I imagined his patience had run out and that I’d asked an inappropriate question.

And then, he cleared his throat.

I expected him to chastise me and tell me he was tired.

But in a broken voice, almost a whisper, he said, “Son, there is greatness and goodness in the world.” And then another long pause, a pause I didn’t understand for many years. And then he said, “And son … there is also hatred and evil.”

It wasn’t until I had children of my own, when I had to dispel the myth and take away their innocence by explaining to them that there was greatness and goodness in the world, but there is also hatred and evil. It’s the moment every parent dreads the most. To tell their child something that will take the twinkle from their eyes and will tarnish the joy in their hearts.

But then we encourage our children to love. Just like my grandfather did for me. To be a light in a dark world where hate and anger and evil try to destroy us. We must be better and to do good in the world.

Better to light a candle than to curse the darkness.

Hate can’t drive out hate. Only love can do that. Thank you, Dr. King.

— 30 —

—————————————————————————

APRIL IS BRING A FRIEND TO BOOT CAMP MONTH!

In honor of my friend, Tom Farrar, who passed away at the tender age of 54. Tom was my accountant and a great guy, but he did NOT take care of himself.

Ever since Tom’s death, a death I believe was preventable, I’ve designated April as the “TOM FARRAR MEMORIAL BRING A FRIEND TO BOOT CAMP MONTH.”

• You can bring a friend for a week for free!

• No strings attached, no pressure to join!

• I won’t gather their contact info, and I won’t do anything but make them feel welcome!

• Absolutely no sales pitch, no guilt, and no veiled attempt to sign them up.

In fact, if they decide to continue after their free week with us, they’ll have to initiate that!

Let them come and enjoy a week on the Quarterdeck at no charge!

If you no longer live in Memphis, but your friends and family are still here, send them to me for a FREE WEEK!

If you’re injured and unable to exercise with your friend, go ahead and send them to me. You don’t have to be with them. Your referral will be enough.

And if you need to get back on the Quarterdeck yourself, c’mon!

I promise NOT to guilt you or give you a hard time! I don’t care if you’ve gained weight or you’re out of shape. Don’t be embarrassed! I’m not going to shame you or make you feel bad. I’m always so happy to see you! You’ll be met with a hug or a hearty handshake and a “welcome home” reception!

Since I don’t advertise, you guys are my sales staff, so please share this post and tag your friends in the comments.

—————————————————————————

TODAY’S NUTRITION TALK
by Sergeant Major Ashley Holloway, MS, RD, LDN

(A Registered Dietitian has a BS in Food Science, followed by a one-year internship through an accredited university, and then with the recommendation of the internship program’s supervisor, a national examination is required. After that, an RD must have continuing education units annually in order to remain active and registered. An RD is an expert, not a hobbyist or a “food enthusiast.”)

Have a Snack Attack

Is snacking throughout the day bad or good for you? Some people believe that it is better to eat three square meals a day without snacks in between. Others believe that snacking is not healthy because when they think of the word “snack” they think of typical vending machine fare such as candy bars, chips, or regular soda. If you do find yourself craving sweets or other not so healthy treats, it could just be that you let yourself get too hungry.

The good news is that proper snacking is healthy for you and is an important part of anyone’s diet. Eating often, every three to four hours, helps to maintain your blood sugar levels, your carbohydrate stores, and keeps your body fueled for the next activity. Snacking often also helps prevent uncontrollable hunger, which can lead to an unhealthy snack attack where you eat large quantities of food or you make unhealthy snack choices that you wouldn’t have made if you were not so hungry.

The best way to snack is to consider it as more of a mini-meal than a snack. Focus on choosing items that you would have for a regular meal but on a smaller scale. To optimize nutrition, be sure to select items from several different food groups. To make sure that do not skip these all-important snacks, pack your desk at work or your gym bag with healthy items such as dried fruit, nuts, instant oatmeal packets, granola or sport bars, peanut butter, pop top cans of tuna, and whole grain crackers. If you are on the go a lot, take along a small cooler stocked with healthy snacks. Some great healthy snacks to try include:

· – a slice of veggie topped pizza
· – string cheese and a piece of fruit
· – sliced apples spread with peanut butter or almond butter
· – trail mix with nuts and dried fruit with a glass of milk
· – Greek yogurt sprinkled with mixed berries
· – instant oatmeal made with milk topped with almonds
· – whole wheat toast topped with peanut butter and banana
· – baby carrots dipped in hummus
· – 100 calorie bag of microwavable popcorn with 1cup low-fat chocolate milk
· – Triscuit Thins with Laughing Cow or Baybel cheese
· – Whole grain pretzels dipped into peanut butter

———————————————————

MAKE A FACE!!!!

INCREASE YOUR WEIGHTS!

YOU GET OUT WHAT YOU PUT IN!

What you get out of the workouts is determined by you.

How much do you work? How much effort you put into trying to do all of the repetitions with proper form and how much weight you’re using will determine what you get out of each workout.

YOU DETERMINE WHETHER YOUR WORKOUT IS HALF-ASS OR KICKASS!

It’s time for you to go up in weights … that’s what I’m thinking!

MAKING A FACE (THE GRIMACE) IS THE POOR MAN’S (OR WOMAN’S) FACELIFT!

—————————————————

Patreon

Through the years—almost 19 now—folks have been super supportive of USMC Fitness Boot Camp and all that I do through it.

Weekly, I hear from former boot campers who’ve moved away. They write saying how significant the program was to them, how much they miss it, and how much they enjoy getting the newsletters and Facebook updates.

Sometimes, those who’ve moved away send money because they want to be helpful and to support the program. This happened just a few days ago. Sometimes these folks know that at any point in time, there are about half a dozen boot campers coming for free because they lost their job, or there’s been some other detrimental change in their finances and they’d have to drop out boot camp.

We’re the only fitness company in Memphis that allows members to continue to participate for free if they lose their jobs or their finances take a horrible hit. And when they’re back on their feet, they just start paying from that point forward. The months they came for free never have to be paid back.

I consider what I do to be more ministry than business, and don’t kick anyone out because of money problems.

Like you, I support different causes and organizations in Memphis just because I believe in what they do and want to help them keep doing it. Monthly, I support 8 different local entities, including WKNO and Literacy Mid-South.

Additionally, last year I started supporting two different people on a site called Patreon. It’s a way to support artists, musicians, writers, instructors, and others who produce content or provide services of a broad nature but might not be able to continue doing so without financial support from patrons … like how educators, artists, musicians, and others were supported by patrons back in the day.

I’ve been encouraged to join Patreon myself, giving folks an opportunity to support the program in small automatic monthly amounts.

Check out the page and if you feel led to support the work I do, even if it’s $1 a month, the number of patrons will be an encouragement to me and others!

https://www.patreon.com/TonyLudlow/overview

Thank you so much!

—————————————————

ARE WE FACEBOOK FRIENDS?

We should be!

HAVE YOU “LIKED” THE USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP FACEBOOK PAGE?

You should totally do that!

—————————————————

Q. How can I get up in the morning on a consistent basis?

A. Contrary to what many think, I am NOT a morning person. I have to be “dynamited” out of the bed! Here are some tips to help you get going in the morning:

1. Use two alarm clocks. I have a snooze alarm that starts going off several minutes before I intend to get up. Then I have a “Last Call” alarm clock that is located across the room. This alarm clock is set to go off when I MUST get up.

2. Once the last call alarm goes off, the bed becomes OFF LIMITS! Get moving!

3. Get out of bed, turn off the alarm clock, and start turning on lights all through the house. Turn the TV on!

4. Lay out your clothes the night before. Don’t go wandering around the house in the morning trying to find your left shoe and your favorite shorts. So, have things ready the night before.

—————————————–

What would you do if money was not an issue, fear was not a factor, and failure was not an option?

To your optimum health and fitness!

SEE YOU ON THE QUARTERDECK!

Tony

Sergeant Major Tony Ludlow

USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP, Commanding
Mailing address: 4888 Southern Ave., Memphis, TN 38117
Text: 901-644-0145

Posted by Tony Ludlow | in Uncategorized | No Comments »


We’re Up All Night to Get Lucky! — Tony Ludlow, 3/28/2018

Mar. 28th 2018

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You probably don’t know Kathy Warren.

You might know someone “named” Kathy Warren, because, according to Facebook, there are a ton of Kathy Warrens out there.

But I’m pretty sure the one I’m talking about isn’t the one you might know.

But I bet every one of you have heard the voice of Kathy Warren. “THE” Kathy Warren, that is.

Nothing about Kathy Warren would indicate she would be so well known. Even after 30 years since she became “famous,” she’s still famous. Nothing about Kathy Warren’s education or background would lead you to think she should be an important part of pop culture.

Some would say she was just lucky.

It’s amazing how many famous people, even those who are obviously talented, claim their good fortune and fame were the result of good luck. You hear it all the time. I recently heard Sting say he had just been lucky.

Really? Sting?

What is luck?

I’m not going to wade into the deep and often unsettling waters of Providence versus Fate, or intelligent design over random chance, free-will versus predetermined will, or even try to tackle the notion that “God helps those who help themselves.”

That last one was a theological staple around the Ludlow house when I was growing up. It was followed by “cleanliness is next to Godliness” and then immediately followed by “now, go clean up your room!”

Later when I became an insufferable little know it all, I announced that the cleanliness and Godliness thing wasn’t in the Bible. That earned me an entire weekend of divine cleaning.

OK, back to luck.

Sometimes it’s said that luck favors the prepared.

What is pretty clear to me is that good things tend to happen to certain people and crappy things tend to happen to others.

I have some Facebook friends who fall into that last category. Seems every day of their lives, and every one of their Facebook status updates are a different version of the same song, “woe is me,” “nobody knows the trouble I’ve seen,” and “gloom, despair, and agony on me.” In other words, they’re really fun people. “If it weren’t for bad luck, I’d have no luck at all” kind of people.

But what if you could do things to alter your “luck.” What if you could alter, adjust, and realign your day-to-day life to increase your luck like the lucky people do? What if you could prepare to get lucky?

Interested?

Ten Ways to Increase Your Luck

1. Pay attention to your surroundings.

You won’t spot the $20 bill on the sidewalk unless you’re looking. Be alert! Look around! Keep your eyes and ears open! You never know what you’ll discover by accident.

2. Strike up conversations with strangers (Ladies, you probably need to be a LITTLE cautious here.)

You never know who you’ll meet, the contacts you’ll establish, or the new friends you’ll make in the most average of places: the line at the grocery, the bank, the county jail (just checking to see if you’re awake). I have a friend who had a life changing experience after she got locked up for DUI. You meet some interesting people in jail … so I’ve heard.

Talking to random people is one of my favorite things to do! Some people are more risk-free than others: clerks, waiters, waitresses, and sales people are usually less risky and easy to talk to since they sort of have to talk to you! And they’re less shady than street people talking to themselves, half naked guys in a convenience store, or Ole Miss grads. (Love ya, Ole Miss friends! Just checking to see if you’re still paying attention!)

I actually “met” Ashley during a phone conversation.

Several years ago, I was asked by a production company of the BBC to consider spending two weeks in England participating in a television show they were looking to produce. The program was to have me cast as a Marine fitness instructor leading two families back from obesity toward fitness. The producer wanted me to bring along a Registered Dietitian, if I could. At the time, I only knew one RD and it wasn’t Ashley.

I called, Mary, the RD I knew, and pitched the prospective short-term job to her. Mary was unable to do it, but she did give me the name of an RD she believed would be perfect for the job, Ashley. So, I called her! We had a great conversation. She was indeed open to pursue the opportunity in Great Britain and so I contacted the BBC and told them we were good to go here in the States and ready.

Unfortunately, about a month later, the production company was unable to secure the kind of funding and support they needed and had to abandon the project. They called me and I had to call Ashley with the bad news. She seemed delightful and so friendly, I was sorry I wasn’t going to have the chance to meet her.

But a few years later … lucky me, right?!

3. Unfriend your negative “friends.”

This is a Facebook thing you can actually do in real life. That’s right. If someone is dragging you down, robbing you of your joy, making you feel badly about yourself, sucking all of the energy out of your life, then just cut ‘em loose!

If you have the power to choose and the power to dismiss them from your life, don’t allow anyone inside who doesn’t make you happy, inspire you to be a better person, respect you, or make you feel loved and appreciated. If they’re prone to frequent melt-downs, outbursts, temper tantrums, disrespect, drunk drama, and other forms of inappropriate behavior … “hey, hey, hey, goooooood bye!”

When it’s in your power to do so, dismiss the negative people from your life. In my experience, most of the people who treat me in ways that are not acceptable are people in a bad relationship with themselves. But that’s not my problem to fix. And that kind of perspective on life is something I don’t need. Plus, it’s not very lucky!

4. Vary your daily routine.

Do like Supertramp and take the long way home. Stop at a shop just to browse. Take a different route to work. You never know what a variation of routine will bring.

I know a woman who believes God is going to give her a husband. She’s been waiting and praying for over 20 years. She goes to work, comes home, and goes to church. Her routine never varies. She travels the exact same roads and never colors outside the lines. I guess she’s going to marry the FedEx guy. I don’t think she’s met anyone new in years.

5. Be aggressive and decisive about making the changes you want in your life.

No one is more interested in you and your dreams than YOU are! That means the odds of someone arriving at your door, or in your life, to put you on the fast track to a new or better life is slim to none. But mostly none.

Get on with it!

A sailboat isn’t maneuverable unless it’s moving. It needs wind in its sails. When it’s dead in the water, it’s impossible to steer.

MOVE!

Nike said, “Just Do It” And Shakespeare (or Edward De Vere, the 17th Earl of Oxford, your choice) said, “The bow is drawn, make straight the arrow.”

The universe rewards movement, activity, and energy. Bust a move!

6. Follow your hunches and gut feelings.

Pay attention when something doesn’t feel quite right. I’m not talking about daily paranoia or constant suspicion of everything around you – which is a clear indication of the need for mental health counseling ASAP! But listen when your gut talks to you. Pay attention to the red flags … AND the green ones too!

A lot is said about the red flags in our lives. We learn to recognize them and to avoid them.

But what about the green flags? The ones that say “GO!” In the same way we avoid those red flag situations, we need to move quickly and confidently when the universe gives us the green!

I’ve listened to that little voice with the green flag and been soooo happy I did. And then … I’ve ignored that little voice waving the red flag and lived to regret it. I can’t remember a time when the red flag was wrong.

In his book, “Blink,” Malcolm Gladwell describes the brain’s ability to get impressions and to make decisions from a small amount of input and knowledge. It’s a behavioral scientist’s view of unconscious impressions and their significance. If it seems wrong, it probably is. And if it seems right, it just might be!

7. Expect good things.

If you think something good is going to happen you’ll be more likely to spot it when it does. And associated with this is giving people the benefit of the doubt. Miserable people assume the worst and usually get it.

Dropkick the drama queens (and kings) from your life. They’re usually miserable and want YOU to be miserable right along with them! They’re expecting doom. Leave them to it … without you!

Look for the good in people and situations. I always err on the side of giving people the benefit of the doubt. My default setting is to like new people and to think of new people as good and honorable. Sometimes, this has backfired. But I’d rather wear the rose-colored glasses and have occasional disappointment than the other way around.

8. Smile.

Not only does this inspire others to smile back, but it is the easiest and fastest thing you can do to make yourself look more attractive and accessible … unless you’re missing a lot of teeth. Then you should contact my friends, and sometimes Boot Campers, Dr. John Whittemore, DDS or Dr. Dory Sellers, DDS.

It’s interesting how smiles turn to laughter and the whole vibe changes.

9. Outlast bad luck and look for opportunities.

Often a negative turn of events creates unexpected opportunities for good things. I started USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP because I was strapped for money eighteen years ago and needed to supplement my teacher’s salary to make ends meet. Now look at the EMPIRE that has grown from me being broke!

When I first became self-employed, I was very very protective of my finances and was tight fisted with my money. One woman and her husband, not friends of mine, ridiculed my frugal behavior at the time and made fun of my struggle to create a successful business.

They’ve both filed for bankruptcy … twice … in the past 10 years. But I never did.

As an aside, I know that sometimes things happen beyond a person’s control and bankruptcy is the only option to dig out of a bad situation. Catastrophic illness is one of the single most common causes of bankruptcy. Bad things happen to good people. Things that person had no control over.

What I’m talking about is financial irresponsibility. Like the woman I knew who was $47,000 in credit card debt with nothing to show for it and somehow managed to get a new car, just so she had MORE debt when she filed for bankruptcy. Pity the poor guy who married that crazy chick! (He apparently ignored his gut and all of those red flags!)

Outlast the “set back” and look for opportunities!

10. Be positive, grateful, and thankful.

Ever notice how people who exhibit those things seem to be happy … seem to be so lucky? Putting positive energy out there into the world comes back to you! As one of you told me recently, “Tony, when people whine and complain they just become big ‘crap magnets.'”

The opposite is true too! When people are positive, grateful, and thankful they become magnets of great things, wonderful things, and “oh so many startlements.”

The music group, 10cc, recorded “I’m Not in Love” in 1975. At the time, the analog technique used to create that ethereal choral sound was unheard of. It was pretty cutting-edge stuff. Later, it would be used by a number of groups. Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” is one of the better-known songs that copied the technique. And Enya’s success is completely dependent on those innovations.

I really like “I’m Not in Love.” There I said it. Whatever. Get over it! And one of the most important parts of the song is the obvious woman the singer is supposedly not in love with, saying “be quiet, big boys don’t cry.” The receptionist at the recording studio — Strawberry Studios — came out from behind the receptionist’s desk to be the voice of that woman, saying those six words. Six words that were essential in knowing that the singer really was in love. Six words that are a part of classic rock lexicography.

Kathy Warren said, “I was working at Strawberry Studios as a secretary and receptionist … when they (the members of the group) were trying to work out what to put in the middle eight. And a telephone call came through for Eric. So, I went to the studio door and just opened it quietly and whispered, ‘Eric, there’s a phone call for you.’ And they all said, ‘That’s it!’ The line they asked me to say was, ‘[whispered] Be quiet, big boys don’t cry.’”

And just like that, a lucky girl got luckier still. I’ll bet Kathy had already proven she was positive, happy, helpful, and a team player. No wonder she was so lucky!

So, here you are! Ten ways to get lucky!

Good luck, everyone!

— 30 —

—————————————————————————

APRIL IS BRING A FRIEND TO BOOT CAMP MONTH!

In honor of my friend, Tom Farrar, who passed away at the tender age of 54. Tom was my accountant and a great guy, but he did NOT take care of himself.

Ever since Tom’s death, a death I believe was preventable, I’ve designated April as the “TOM FARRAR MEMORIAL BRING A FRIEND TO BOOT CAMP MONTH.”

• You can bring a friend for a week for free!

• No strings attached, no pressure to join!

• I won’t gather their contact info, and I won’t do anything but make them feel welcome!

• Absolutely no sales pitch, no guilt, and no veiled attempt to sign them up.

In fact, if they decide to continue after their free week with us, they’ll have to initiate that!

Let them come and enjoy a week on the Quarterdeck at no charge!

If you no longer live in Memphis, but your friends and family are still here, send them to me for a FREE WEEK!

If you’re injured and unable to exercise with your friend, go ahead and send them to me. You don’t have to be with them. Your referral will be enough.

And if you need to get back on the Quarterdeck yourself, c’mon!

I promise NOT to guilt you or give you a hard time! I don’t care if you’ve gained weight or you’re out of shape. Don’t be embarrassed! I’m not going to shame you or make you feel bad. I’m always so happy to see you! You’ll be met with a hug or a hearty handshake and a “welcome home” reception!

Since I don’t advertise, you guys are my sales staff, so please share this post and tag your friends in the comments.

—————————————————————————

TODAY’S NUTRITION TALK
by Sergeant Major Ashley Holloway, MS, RD, LDN

(A Registered Dietitian has a BS in Food Science, followed by a one-year internship through an accredited university, and then with the recommendation of the internship program’s supervisor, a national examination is required. After that, an RD must have continuing education units annually in order to remain active and registered. An RD is an expert, not a hobbyist or a “food enthusiast.”)

Have a Snack Attack

Is snacking throughout the day bad or good for you? Some people believe that it is better to eat three square meals a day without snacks in between. Others believe that snacking is not healthy because when they think of the word “snack” they think of typical vending machine fare such as candy bars, chips, or regular soda. If you do find yourself craving sweets or other not so healthy treats, it could just be that you let yourself get too hungry.

The good news is that proper snacking is healthy for you and is an important part of anyone’s diet. Eating often, every three to four hours, helps to maintain your blood sugar levels, your carbohydrate stores, and keeps your body fueled for the next activity. Snacking often also helps prevent uncontrollable hunger, which can lead to an unhealthy snack attack where you eat large quantities of food or you make unhealthy snack choices that you wouldn’t have made if you were not so hungry.

The best way to snack is to consider it as more of a mini-meal than a snack. Focus on choosing items that you would have for a regular meal but on a smaller scale. To optimize nutrition, be sure to select items from several different food groups. To make sure that do not skip these all-important snacks, pack your desk at work or your gym bag with healthy items such as dried fruit, nuts, instant oatmeal packets, granola or sport bars, peanut butter, pop top cans of tuna, and whole grain crackers. If you are on the go a lot, take along a small cooler stocked with healthy snacks. Some great healthy snacks to try include:

· – a slice of veggie topped pizza
· – string cheese and a piece of fruit
· – sliced apples spread with peanut butter or almond butter
· – trail mix with nuts and dried fruit with a glass of milk
· – Greek yogurt sprinkled with mixed berries
· – instant oatmeal made with milk topped with almonds
· – whole wheat toast topped with peanut butter and banana
· – baby carrots dipped in hummus
· – 100 calorie bag of microwavable popcorn with 1cup low-fat chocolate milk
· – Triscuit Thins with Laughing Cow or Baybel cheese
· – Whole grain pretzels dipped into peanut butter

———————————————————

MAKE A FACE!!!!

INCREASE YOUR WEIGHTS!

YOU GET OUT WHAT YOU PUT IN!

What you get out of the workouts is determined by you.

How much do you work? How much effort you put into trying to do all of the repetitions with proper form and how much weight you’re using will determine what you get out of each workout.

YOU DETERMINE WHETHER YOUR WORKOUT IS HALF-ASS OR KICKASS!

It’s time for you to go up in weights … that’s what I’m thinking!

MAKING A FACE (THE GRIMACE) IS THE POOR MAN’S (OR WOMAN’S) FACELIFT!

—————————————————

Patreon

Through the years—almost 19 now—folks have been super supportive of USMC Fitness Boot Camp and all that I do through it.

Weekly, I hear from former boot campers who’ve moved away. They write saying how significant the program was to them, how much they miss it, and how much they enjoy getting the newsletters and Facebook updates.

Sometimes, those who’ve moved away send money because they want to be helpful and to support the program. This happened just a few days ago. Sometimes these folks know that at any point in time, there are about half a dozen boot campers coming for free because they lost their job, or there’s been some other detrimental change in their finances and they’d have to drop out boot camp.

We’re the only fitness company in Memphis that allows members to continue to participate for free if they lose their jobs or their finances take a horrible hit. And when they’re back on their feet, they just start paying from that point forward. The months they came for free never have to be paid back.

I consider what I do to be more ministry than business, and don’t kick anyone out because of money problems.

Like you, I support different causes and organizations in Memphis just because I believe in what they do and want to help them keep doing it. Monthly, I support 8 different local entities, including WKNO and Literacy Mid-South.

Additionally, last year I started supporting two different people on a site called Patreon. It’s a way to support artists, musicians, writers, instructors, and others who produce content or provide services of a broad nature but might not be able to continue doing so without financial support from patrons … like how educators, artists, musicians, and others were supported by patrons back in the day.

I’ve been encouraged to join Patreon myself, giving folks an opportunity to support the program in small automatic monthly amounts.

Check out the page and if you feel led to support the work I do, even if it’s $1 a month, the number of patrons will be an encouragement to me and others!

https://www.patreon.com/TonyLudlow/overview

Thank you so much!

—————————————————

ARE WE FACEBOOK FRIENDS?

We should be!

HAVE YOU “LIKED” THE USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP FACEBOOK PAGE?

You should totally do that!

—————————————————

Q. How can I get up in the morning on a consistent basis?

A. Contrary to what many think, I am NOT a morning person. I have to be “dynamited” out of the bed! Here are some tips to help you get going in the morning:

1. Use two alarm clocks. I have a snooze alarm that starts going off several minutes before I intend to get up. Then I have a “Last Call” alarm clock that is located across the room. This alarm clock is set to go off when I MUST get up.

2. Once the last call alarm goes off, the bed becomes OFF LIMITS! Get moving!

3. Get out of bed, turn off the alarm clock, and start turning on lights all through the house. Turn the TV on!

4. Lay out your clothes the night before. Don’t go wandering around the house in the morning trying to find your left shoe and your favorite shorts. So, have things ready the night before.

—————————————–

What would you do if money was not an issue, fear was not a factor, and failure was not an option?

To your optimum health and fitness!

SEE YOU ON THE QUARTERDECK!

Tony

Sergeant Major Tony Ludlow

USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP, Commanding
Mailing address: 4888 Southern Ave., Memphis, TN 38117
Text: 901-644-0145

Posted by Tony Ludlow | in Uncategorized | No Comments »


Zuuto Tomodachi — Tony Ludlow, 3/22/2018

Mar. 22nd 2018

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You have to try hard to avoid seeing published articles—almost daily—explaining the far-reaching benefits of exercise. Benefits that go beyond the physical! Toward that end …

APRIL IS BRING A FRIEND TO BOOT CAMP MONTH!

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In honor of my friend, Tom Farrar, who passed away at the tender age of 54. Tom was my accountant and a great guy, but he did NOT take care of himself.

As an Air Force vet, he enjoyed chiding me for being a Marine 24/7 and always staying in shape. “All of that running around and sweaty exercise is good for you Marines, Tony,” he’d say, “I’m more of a fine wine and dining sorta fella!”

No matter what I said, I couldn’t convince my Type-A, overweight, high-strung friend to exercise and lose weight.

Tom had a heart attack and died in his front yard picking up his newspaper one morning in the spring of 2007. (He would have joked that The Commercial Appeal was responsible for his demise.)

Ever since Tom’s death, a death I believe was preventable, I’ve designated April as the “TOM FARRAR MEMORIAL BRING A FRIEND TO BOOT CAMP MONTH.”

• You can bring a friend for a week for free!

• No strings attached, no pressure to join!

• I won’t gather their contact info, and I won’t do anything but make them feel welcome!

• Absolutely no sales pitch, no guilt, and no veiled attempt to sign them up.

In fact, if they decide to continue after their free week with us, they’ll have to initiate that!

And I promise not to be mean to them!

You guys aren’t clients or members; you’re family and friends to me. So, thank you for your continued support. If the program has been beneficial to you, invite a friend to join you for a week, especially a sedentary friend. This isn’t really an invitation to people who are actively involved in some other all-inclusive fitness program. Sedentary people, people who only run or who only cycle are the kind of folks that I’m hoping we can reach!

Let them come and enjoy a week on the Quarterdeck at no charge!

If you no longer live in Memphis, but your friends and family are still here, send them to me for a FREE WEEK!

If you’re injured and unable to exercise with your friend, go ahead and send them to me. You don’t have to be with them. Your referral will be enough.

And if you need to get back on the Quarterdeck yourself, c’mon!

I promise NOT to guilt you or give you a hard time! I don’t care if you’ve gained weight or you’re out of shape. Don’t be embarrassed! I’m not going to shame you or make you feel bad. I’m always so happy to see you! You’ll be met with a hug or a hearty handshake and a “welcome home” reception!

Since I don’t advertise, you guys are my sales staff, so please share this post and tag your friends in the comments.

30

—————————————–

Patreon

Through the years—almost 19 now—folks have been super supportive of USMC Fitness Boot Camp and all that I do through it: lead 3 daily exercise classes, counsel members, lead half marathon training, write essays, and provide health, fitness, and nutrition counseling.

Weekly, I hear from former boot campers who’ve moved away. They write saying how significant the program was to them, how much they miss it, and how much they enjoy getting the newsletters and Facebook updates.

Some of those folks still live in Memphis but life and circumstances have “providentially” hindered them from coming back to the Quarterdeck, usually because they’ve moved out the city into the county.

Sometimes, those who’ve moved away send money because they want to be helpful and to support the program. This happened just a few days ago. Sometimes these folks know that at any point in time, there are about half a dozen boot campers coming for free because they lost their job, or there’s been some other detrimental change in their finances and they’d have to drop out boot camp.

We’re the only fitness company in Memphis that allows members to continue to participate for free if they lose their jobs or their finances take a horrible hit. And when they’re back on their feet, they just start paying from that point forward. The months they came for free never have to be paid back.

I consider what I do to be more ministry than business, and don’t kick anyone out because of money problems.

Like you, I support different causes and organizations in Memphis just because I believe in what they do and want to help them keep doing it. Monthly, I support 5 different local entities, including WKNO and Literacy Mid-South.

Additionally, last year I started supporting two different people on a site called Patreon. It’s a way to support artists, musicians, writers, instructors, and others who produce content of a broad nature, but might not be able to continue doing so without financial support from patrons … like how educators, artists, musicians, and others were supported by patrons back in the day.

I’ve been encouraged to join Patreon myself, giving folks an opportunity to support the program in small automatic monthly amounts.

Check out the page and if you feel led to support the work I do, even if it’s $1 a month, the number of patrons will be an encouragement to me and others!

https://www.patreon.com/TonyLudlow/overview

Thank you so much!

————————————

TODAY’S NUTRITION TALK

by First Sergeant Ashley Holloway, Registered Dietitian, LDN, MS.

(A Registered Dietitian has a BS in Food Science, followed by a one-year internship through an accredited university, and then with the recommendation of the internship program’s supervisor, a national examination is required. After that, an RD must have continuing education units annually in order to remain active and registered. An RD is an expert, not a hobbyist or a “food enthusiast.”)

Nutritional Science 101- Muscle Mania

In order to have the best physical health, we need to make sure that our bodies are packed with muscle. Muscle makes up about 75 percent of our lean body mass. Lean body mass also includes our organs, bones, tissue, and skin. It generates heat, and it serves as a pool of protein for our muscles and vital organs, and tissues. Muscle gives us mobility and balance and allows us to get up from a sitting position, to walk across the room, and to do all activities that we do in our daily lives.

The bad news is, the amount of muscle mass we have will decrease as we get older! And by older, I mean around 25-30 years of age. The reason we begin to lose muscle as we age is due to the slowdown of how our body uses the protein we eat to build muscle, called protein synthesis. By age 40, we can lose up to 8% of our muscle mass every ten years, and then around 70 years of age, this muscle loss can almost double to a 15% loss every ten years. That is a lot of muscle loss!

Another way we lose muscle is if we become ill or injured in some way. If our bodies are trying to fight off an illness or repair from an injury, it increases our need for calories and protein. And if we are unable to eat or consume enough protein for the healing process, our bodies will actually break our muscles down so that the protein can be used for healing. This muscle loss can happen very quickly and rapidly! If we are younger and have plenty of muscle, breaking down a little of our muscle may not be a big deal. But if we are older and are already losing muscle due to aging, the consequences can be devastating, and could also be life ending!

Losing just 10% of our muscle mass leads to decreased immunity and increased risk of infection. The more muscle mass we lose, the worse it is.

Losing muscle and lean body mass leads to:
♣ the inability to heal and recover from surgery, illness or disease
♣ Decreased strength and energy
♣ Loss of independence
♣ Increased risk of falls and fractures
♣ Weakened immune system and increased risk of infections
♣ Impaired healing
♣ Weakness/fatigue
♣ Increased susceptibility to illness
♣ Decreased quality of life

Sadly, when our body loses 40% or more of lean mass, it is incompatible with life, we die. Our body has become so weak, that it just can’t sustain itself any longer.

A person’s weight on the scale is not always a good indicator of muscle loss, especially in people who are overweight and obese. And obese person can be a skinny frail person on the inside, with just a lot of cushion on the outside. One of the best indicators for muscle loss is to look for changes in functional status, strength, and energy. Think about someone older in your life that you have known for a long time. Has their strength, stamina, energy level, or their ability to get around decreased? Is this YOU?

Now that I have sufficiently depressed you, let me tell you the good news! There are things we can do to counteract the natural loss of lean body mass as we age. We can’t slow down the loss completely, but we can slow it down considerably. We can avoid losing our independence, our functionality, our strength, and stamina by doing two key things.

The first key thing we can do (and should do) to maintain muscle mass is to do strength training exercises. You have probably heard the saying “If you don’t use it, you lose it.” Well, research shows that performing weight bearing exercises a minimum of 2-3 days a week does help to prevent muscle loss and build our muscle mass. These exercises don’t have to include heavy weights or even joining a gym, but each session should cover all the major muscle groups. Push-ups, sit-ups, wall squats, planks, lunges, and many other body weight exercises can be done to accomplish this goal.

The second thing we can/should do to prevent age-related muscle loss, it is recommended that we eat protein at least three to four times a day, consuming 20-30 grams at a time, for the highest muscle building rate. An average three-ounce portion of meat (about the size and thickness as the palm of your hand) contains a little over 20 grams of protein. The type of protein should be high-quality protein such as meat, milk, poultry, and fish. Nuts, seeds, legumes, and many other foods also contain protein to meet that 20-30 gram per meal goal.

Consuming plenty of protein is usually no problem at all when we are younger. But as we age, we typically eat a lot less protein. Why? The reasons can be numerous: taste changes, digestion issues, chewing problems, difficulty preparing meals, living solo, and many more reasons. As we age, we need to pay close attention to the amount of protein we eat and strive to take in enough to prevent the loss of our muscle and decreases in functionality, strength, and energy.

As you can see, muscle mass is extremely important and is vital for life. Strength training exercises and good nutrition play a key role in helping maintain and build lean body mass. Having healthy muscles equals a healthier, stronger, independent you!

Have you ever wondered how the protein we eat turns into muscle? When we eat eggs, turkey, beef, pork, and other sources of protein, your body uses about 8% of the calories from protein for muscle building and repair. Here is a simplified tutorial adapted from Men’s Health on how it all works.

Step 1-Digestion: When we eat protein, enzymes from your stomach and small intestine break down protein into smaller pieces called amino acids (the building blocks of protein) and peptides (which are chains of at least two or three amino acids.) More enzymes in the small intestine further breakdown the peptides into amino acids for use throughout the body.

Step 2-Transport: Once the protein is broken down completely into amino acids, they travel to the liver through a vein called the hepatic (liver) portal vein. One of the jobs the liver has is to send out amino acids back into our bloodstream to be used by our muscles.

Step 3-Response: Our muscles are made up of woven bundles of muscle fibers. When we perform weight bearing exercises, we develop small micro-tears in the muscle fibers. When this happens our body signals to your immune system that muscle repair is needed. Growth hormones, stem cells, and amino acids are all called in to help repair the damage.

Step 4-Construction: Amino acids are then weaved together to form myofibrils which are bundles of protein threads to be used for muscle building and repair.

Step 5-Repair and Growth: These bundles of protein threads are then fused with the damaged areas of our muscles to repair the micro-tears that were caused by exercise. These myofibrils not only repair the damage, but also help to make your muscles bigger and stronger.

———————————-

REMIND!

I’ve recently signed up for the messaging app called Remind. Designed with schools in mind, it is easily adaptable for groups and organizations like ours.

Signing up is free and easy. Your privacy is ensured and there will be no group text situations that makes us all crazy! I’m the only one who can reply to everyone. Any messages from you will only go to me, not to the whole group.

I’ll only utilize this messaging service to inform you of any changes to venue or times. Likewise, I’ll use it, in addition to Facebook, to announce any weather-related cancellations or changes.

Just copy and paste this link into your browser to sign up: remind.com/join/usmcfi

————————————-

What would you do if money was not an issue, fear was not a factor, and failure was not an option?
To your optimum health and fitness!

SEE YOU ON THE QUARTERDECK!

Tony

Sergeant Major Tony Ludlow
USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP, Commanding
Mailing address: 4888 Southern Ave., Memphis, TN 38117
Cell Phone: 901-644-0145

Posted by Tony Ludlow | in Uncategorized | No Comments »


QQ < 0.0

Mar. 15th 2018

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Professor Stephen Hawking, PhD, has died at the age of 76.

If you missed “A Brief History of Time: From the Big Bang to Black Holes,” published in 1988, you might have been exposed to Dr. Hawking through his “appearances” on “The Simpsons” or “Futurama,” or his real appearances on “The Big Bang Theory.”

And if not those things, you might have seen the 2014 movie, “The Theory of Everything,” a movie about his amazing life.

Even his doctoral dissertation, which I’m planning to plagiarize in my own dissertation, is available online: PDF – PR-PHD-05437_CUDL2017-reduced.pdf

I love physics and science, but I don’t have much of an aptitude for them. Much like my appreciation of music, but with no ability to play beyond rank beginner. I tested out of one semester of physics in college, but I couldn’t test out of the second semester. And I didn’t make straight A’s in the two years of college physics I took. But I did okay. But I loved it nonetheless.

The title of the movie, “The Theory of Everything,” comes from the hypothesis, famously put forward by Albert Einstein, that there is a theory of everything (ToE) that ties quantum mechanics with astrophysics with cosmology with every other physical aspect of the universe and explains it all.

I’ve been in a PhD program for almost two years working on a doctorate in leadership. I attended my first official leadership training in 1977. I graduated first in my class in that Non-Commissioned Officer’s Leadership School. (On a side-note, Scot Bearup’s father was my primary instructor and the Senior Staff NCO of the school!) I’ve attended some form of leadership training about every 3 years since.

I said all of that to say this: there is a theory of everything where leadership is concerned. And I think it’s summarized in one word.

Relationships.

Good leaders formulate good relationships with those they lead.

Tubby Smith has been fired as University of Memphis Men’s Basketball Head Coach. When he signed to come to Memphis 2 years ago, I was excited! Coach Smith came with an impressive resume as a college basketball coach. He led the University of Kentucky to a National Championship in 1998. (But as one disgruntled U of M student said yesterday, “Yes, he won a championship in 1998 … but I wasn’t even BORN in 1998!”) Her comment sort of echoes the “But what have you done for me lately?” mentality. Tubby couldn’t ride his own coattails and fill the seats at the FedEx Forum.

tubby-smith-030518-usnews-getty-ftr_r6e1q08ganiq1ounh8lgfjjaj

Still, I was excited and hopeful when he came, and wanted our Basketball Tigers to match our Football Tigers! The Memphis faithful will know that for decades the reputation of the U of M has been just the opposite. We were always considered a basketball school. But that has changed in recent years! The football program increased as the basketball program decreased. It was like “Stranger Things” and the upside down!

But my excitement started to cool almost from the beginning.

Coach Smith seemed low energy. His television interviews were lacking in the kind of spirit and enthusiasm I had remembered. Still, I didn’t worry too much. That is, until he failed to connect with the University and the community. It looked like he had no relationships with either. I feared he was just “phoning it in.” Like Memphis was just another stop in his coaching career. I wondered if he and his wife had actually unpacked from their move from Texas Tech, where Smith coached for only 3 years.

College coaches moving around from school to school isn’t unusual. But the best programs across the country have a strong tradition and have had few coaches over the years. Since 1961, North Carolina has had only 2 coaches! Coach Mike Krzyzewski, “Coach K,” has been at Duke for 38 years. Rick Byrd has been at Belmont for 32 years. Coach Jim Boeheim has been at Syracuse for 42 years. Tom Izzo has been at Michigan State for 23 years. I could go on. And that’s just a few in NCAA Division 1.

High turnover in any institution or organization is a sign of things wrong, not things right.

Did Coach Smith make a valiant effort to connect with Memphis and build solid relationships here within the community? I can’t answer that. But it doesn’t look like he did. John Calipari, love him or hate him, connected with Memphis. He formed relationships here. He even had a restaurant, “Cal’s Steakhouse,” in the Doubletree Hotel. The place was covered in Cal’s coaching memorabilia. It was his connection here that made his departure so hard to swallow for many. That, and the recruits he took with him to UK.

I had other complaints about Tubby that aren’t germane to this essay, but there seemed to be a shallow relationship between the coach and his players. There was certainly a visible lack of respect on the part of some of the players towards their head coach.

It’s a shame, really. I had high hopes.

If relationships are the theory of everything for leadership, then “Ask better questions” is at the heart of building those relationships. It’s not a matter of asking yes and no questions. It’s all about asking better questions. Open ended questions. Questions that indicate a sincere interest in the other person.

A long time ago, I started evaluating my relationships with people based on something I call the “Question Quotient.” Simply stated, does that person know as much about me as I know about them, based on the kind and quality of the questions we asked one another?” Stated another way, “Are they as interested in me as I am in them?”

I have a friend about whom I know a TON! I can tell you where they went to high school and college. I can tell you where their spouse went to high school and college and what both of their majors were. I can tell you their children’s names and their children’s hobbies and habits. I can tell you which of those children are doing well and which ones aren’t. I can tell you where they vacation and why they go there. I can tell you their pet’s names. I can tell you the names of their parents and things about them. I could easily write a 10-page essay on this friend and their life.
This friend could not tell you how many children I have, much less their names. Actually, I think they could tell you how many children I have only because, like most parents, I’ve talked about my kids without being asked!

As it relates to what my friend knows about me through the questions they’ve asked, very little. What they know from what they’ve asked could fit on one side of a 3×5 card with plenty of space for doodles and cartoons!

I suspect we all have friends like this. And you know the depth of the relationship based on how little interest they seem to have in you. The Question Quotient is below zero. Only when the QQ value is a positive number is that relationship thought of as significant.

A long time ago, I was fixed up on a blind date. I hadn’t been in the States from Japan for more than a couple of years. She seemed nice enough and pretty enough. But when I mentioned that I didn’t know about something that had happened 5 years earlier because I was in Japan. She never asked a single question about that. WHO WOULDN’T ASK A QUESTION ABOUT THAT? “Oh, really? Japan?” “What were you doing in Japan?” “Where did you live in Japan?” “What was it like in Japan?” “Oh, I’ve always wanted to visit Japan! Tell me about living there.”

Nothing.

I thought maybe she didn’t hear me, so later in the conversation I mentioned again that I’d just moved back 2 years earlier from Japan.

Cricket noises.

QQ value of less than zero.

If relationships are the key, then better questions turn the key.

Good questions are better than no questions at all.

But better questions will have a lasting effect on the depth and significance of your relationships. And if you’re in a position of leadership—and who isn’t leading someone, irrespective of our roles?—then being a better leader by asking better questions will make an enormous difference!

Want to be a better friend? Ask better questions!

Want to be a better parent? Ask better questions!

Want to ask better questions? Look beyond the surface. Look beyond the interrogation questions. Look beyond yes and no and the resume. Think in terms of feelings, emotions, motivations, reactions … touch the shared humanity you have with that other person.

Maybe I should write some examples of those kinds of questions.

-30-

—————————–

Patreon

Through the years, people have been super supportive of USMC Fitness Boot Camp and all that I do through it. Almost weekly, I’ll hear from some former boot camper who’s moved away. They write saying how significant the program was to them and how much they enjoy getting these newsletters.

Some of those folks still live in Memphis but life and circumstances have “providentially” hindered them from coming back to the Quarterdeck. (This sounds better than “they got lazy and got out of the habit.”)

Sometimes, those who’ve moved away send money because they want to be helpful and to support the program. This happened just a few days ago. Sometimes these folks know that at any point in time, there are about half a dozen boot campers coming for free because they lost their job, or there’s been some other detrimental change in their finances and situation and would otherwise have to drop out boot camp.

I support different causes and organizations, like you do. But last year I started supporting two different people on a site called Patreon. It’s a way to support artists, musicians, writers, and others who produce content of a broad nature, but might not be able to continue without financial support from patrons … like how educators, artists, musicians, and others were supported by patrons back in the day.

Today, the work produced by members of Patreon is found in printed materials, blog posts, YouTube videos, face to face instruction, consultation, reviews, lectures, and any number of outlets. I support the two I mentioned because I like what they do and want to help.

I’ve been encouraged to join Patreon myself, giving folks who aren’t actively in the program (or even those who are), an opportunity to support the program in small automatic monthly amounts.

More about that later!

————————————

TODAY’S NUTRITION TALK

by First Sergeant Ashley Holloway, Registered Dietitian, LDN, MS.

(A Registered Dietitian has a BS in Food Science, followed by a one-year internship through an accredited university, and then with the recommendation of the internship program’s supervisor, a national examination is required. After that, an RD must have continuing education units annually in order to remain active and registered. An RD is an expert, not a hobbyist or a “food enthusiast.”)

Nutritional Science 101- Muscle Mania

In order to have the best physical health, we need to make sure that our bodies are packed with muscle. Muscle makes up about 75 percent of our lean body mass. Lean body mass also includes our organs, bones, tissue, and skin. It generates heat, and it serves as a pool of protein for our muscles and vital organs, and tissues. Muscle gives us mobility and balance and allows us to get up from a sitting position, to walk across the room, and to do all activities that we do in our daily lives.

The bad news is, the amount of muscle mass we have will decrease as we get older! And by older, I mean around 25-30 years of age. The reason we begin to lose muscle as we age is due to the slowdown of how our body uses the protein we eat to build muscle, called protein synthesis. By age 40, we can lose up to 8% of our muscle mass every ten years, and then around 70 years of age, this muscle loss can almost double to a 15% loss every ten years. That is a lot of muscle loss!

279363_10150384107721978_291972561977_10397364_7724065_o

Another way we lose muscle is if we become ill or injured in some way. If our bodies are trying to fight off an illness or repair from an injury, it increases our need for calories and protein. And if we are unable to eat or consume enough protein for the healing process, our bodies will actually break our muscles down so that the protein can be used for healing. This muscle loss can happen very quickly and rapidly! If we are younger and have plenty of muscle, breaking down a little of our muscle may not be a big deal. But if we are older and are already losing muscle due to aging, the consequences can be devastating, and could also be life ending!

Losing just 10% of our muscle mass leads to decreased immunity and increased risk of infection. The more muscle mass we lose, the worse it is.

Losing muscle and lean body mass leads to:
♣ the inability to heal and recover from surgery, illness or disease
♣ Decreased strength and energy
♣ Loss of independence
♣ Increased risk of falls and fractures
♣ Weakened immune system and increased risk of infections
♣ Impaired healing
♣ Weakness/fatigue
♣ Increased susceptibility to illness
♣ Decreased quality of life

Sadly, when our body loses 40% or more of lean mass, it is incompatible with life, we die. Our body has become so weak, that it just can’t sustain itself any longer.

A person’s weight on the scale is not always a good indicator of muscle loss, especially in people who are overweight and obese. And obese person can be a skinny frail person on the inside, with just a lot of cushion on the outside. One of the best indicators for muscle loss is to look for changes in functional status, strength, and energy. Think about someone older in your life that you have known for a long time. Has their strength, stamina, energy level, or their ability to get around decreased? Is this YOU?

Now that I have sufficiently depressed you, let me tell you the good news! There are things we can do to counteract the natural loss of lean body mass as we age. We can’t slow down the loss completely, but we can slow it down considerably. We can avoid losing our independence, our functionality, our strength, and stamina by doing two key things.

The first key thing we can do (and should do) to maintain muscle mass is to do strength training exercises. You have probably heard the saying “If you don’t use it, you lose it.” Well, research shows that performing weight bearing exercises a minimum of 2-3 days a week does help to prevent muscle loss and build our muscle mass. These exercises don’t have to include heavy weights or even joining a gym, but each session should cover all the major muscle groups. Push-ups, sit-ups, wall squats, planks, lunges, and many other body weight exercises can be done to accomplish this goal.

The second thing we can/should do to prevent age-related muscle loss, it is recommended that we eat protein at least three to four times a day, consuming 20-30 grams at a time, for the highest muscle building rate. An average three-ounce portion of meat (about the size and thickness as the palm of your hand) contains a little over 20 grams of protein. The type of protein should be high-quality protein such as meat, milk, poultry, and fish. Nuts, seeds, legumes, and many other foods also contain protein to meet that 20-30 gram per meal goal.

Consuming plenty of protein is usually no problem at all when we are younger. But as we age, we typically eat a lot less protein. Why? The reasons can be numerous: taste changes, digestion issues, chewing problems, difficulty preparing meals, living solo, and many more reasons. As we age, we need to pay close attention to the amount of protein we eat and strive to take in enough to prevent the loss of our muscle and decreases in functionality, strength, and energy.

As you can see, muscle mass is extremely important and is vital for life. Strength training exercises and good nutrition play a key role in helping maintain and build lean body mass. Having healthy muscles equals a healthier, stronger, independent you!

Have you ever wondered how the protein we eat turns into muscle? When we eat eggs, turkey, beef, pork, and other sources of protein, your body uses about 8% of the calories from protein for muscle building and repair. Here is a simplified tutorial adapted from Men’s Health on how it all works.

Step 1-Digestion: When we eat protein, enzymes from your stomach and small intestine break down protein into smaller pieces called amino acids (the building blocks of protein) and peptides (which are chains of at least two or three amino acids.) More enzymes in the small intestine further breakdown the peptides into amino acids for use throughout the body.

Step 2-Transport: Once the protein is broken down completely into amino acids, they travel to the liver through a vein called the hepatic (liver) portal vein. One of the jobs the liver has is to send out amino acids back into our bloodstream to be used by our muscles.

Step 3-Response: Our muscles are made up of woven bundles of muscle fibers. When we perform weight bearing exercises, we develop small micro-tears in the muscle fibers. When this happens our body signals to your immune system that muscle repair is needed. Growth hormones, stem cells, and amino acids are all called in to help repair the damage.

Step 4-Construction: Amino acids are then weaved together to form myofibrils which are bundles of protein threads to be used for muscle building and repair.

Step 5-Repair and Growth: These bundles of protein threads are then fused with the damaged areas of our muscles to repair the micro-tears that were caused by exercise. These myofibrils not only repair the damage, but also help to make your muscles bigger and stronger.

———————————-

REMIND!

I’ve recently signed up for the messaging app called Remind. Designed with schools in mind, it is easily adaptable for groups and organizations like ours.

Signing up is free and easy. Your privacy is ensured and there will be no group text situations that makes us all crazy! I’m the only one who can reply to everyone. Any messages from you will only go to me, not to the whole group.

I’ll only utilize this messaging service to inform you of any changes to venue or times. Likewise, I’ll use it, in addition to Facebook, to announce any weather-related cancellations or changes.

Just copy and paste this link into your browser to sign up: remind.com/join/usmcfi

————————————-

What would you do if money was not an issue, fear was not a factor, and failure was not an option?
To your optimum health and fitness!

SEE YOU ON THE QUARTERDECK!

Tony

Sergeant Major Tony Ludlow
USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP, Commanding
Mailing address: 4888 Southern Ave., Memphis, TN 38117
Cell Phone: 901-644-0145

Posted by Tony Ludlow | in Uncategorized | No Comments »


Great Expectations — Tony Ludlow, 3/8/2018

Mar. 8th 2018

s-l225

I loved school. But it didn’t always love me back. In the 8th grade I fell into a quagmire of academic quicksand.

Algebra and English were conspiring against me. These two fraternal twins were dishing out misery and frustration of the worst kind and I hated them both. I was awful at Algebra and even further awfullering about to which the grammaringly.

Mrs. Holman was my 8th grade English teacher. She was also the first adult black woman I ever had a conversation with. Or, as Mrs. Holman would insist, “The first adult black woman with whom I ever had a conversation.”

She was a middle-aged lady who wore big jewelry and colorful dresses of the kind that elegant women wore in those days. Her perfume was a very distinctive powdery scent. Nothing was out of place or wrinkled. And she spoke with an adorable Southern accent, right out of some fancy finishing school. If she said, “Young sir, you need to go to the barber shop.” It would sound like, “Yuung suuh, you need to go to the baahba shop.” Think refined Southern like Scarlett, not trailer park Southern like Reba or Paula Dean. (I’m joking. Please, no hate-mail from you Reba or Paula fans!)

Of all the 8th grade English teachers on faculty at Darby Junior High School in Fort Smith, Arkansas, Mrs. Holman had the reputation for being one of the toughest. From the beginning, I was scared.

Our first one-on-one conversation occurred after school early in the first semester. I was failing her class in a horrible and grotesque manner. The first semester was all grammar and the second was all literature and writing.

Apparently, my goal during that first semester was to establish a new level of rock bottom in her grammar class. As it turned out, I was doing a splindid job. Transitive verbs, indirect objects, participles, conjunctions, subjects of prepositions, past pluperfect verbs, subordinate clauses, diagramming sentences … none of it was sticking. (Where were you, “School House Rock”?) Conceptually, I was lost.

So, three days a week, instead of going to football practice after school, I had to go to Mrs. Holman’s classroom for remedial grammar. I was not happy about this and I made no effort to hide the ugly chip on my shoulder. Of course, I blamed Mrs. Holman. It had to be HER fault that I didn’t get it. Grammar, like most things in school, had little real-world application, I reasoned. I didn’t see much point to much of what I was studying.

By the end of the first semester, and after a lot of hard work, I raised my F- to a solid C. And my bitterness towards Mrs. Holman actually turned into something of a crush. She was beyond charming! I can’t emphasize that enough. She had a way of disarming me and convincing me that I could do well. She took such an interest in all of her students, not just me. She was absolutely irresistible. I started working hard to impress her.

By the end of the first semester I was no longer having to get extra help after school and the literature and writing of the second semester were way more fun.

Everything was going just fine, that is until Mrs. Holman did something terrible and unforgivable. She slipped some poetry into the mix. I took an immediate dislike to it.

Poetry?

Seriously?

To me, poetry seemed like 14 year old girls writing maudlin little lines about rainbows and butterflies, horses and sunsets. They liked to add “you see?” to the end of lines to make them rhyme, you see? All of it reeked of pretentiousness, like trying to make that butterfly sound more important than just a flying bug with a colorful costume. And then there was all that nonsense about theme, and meter, and rhythm, and rhyme, and figures of speech, and form. As far as I was concerned, it was worthless in the estimation of my barely pubescent brain. When would I ever need this foolishness, I wondered.

My grades started to tumble again. It seemed like poetry wasn’t very manly nor compelling for a young lad hoping to be a real man one day. I had to start going back to Mrs. Holman’s classroom after school for more help. I complained to her that poetry seemed so feminine and the subjects of the poems so outside of my experiences and interests. I was sure, I told her, that none of the male members of my family ever read such fluffy stuff. She just shook her head and smiled.

Then one afternoon as I was struggling to figure out what some ridiculous poem about daffodils or kittens meant, she handed me a small book.

“Tony Ludlow, you will delight yourself in this book immeasurably, or I am no judge of such matters,” she declared in that wonderful way she spoke. I took the book from her, like I was taking a traffic ticket from a cop. I dreaded having to open that book and read more flowery drivel about boring subjects that held no excitement or application for me … in a style of writing that seemed self-important and overly sentimental.

But the book Mrs. Holman gave me that day was a short collection of poems written by Alfred, Lord Tennyson. She had placed a bookmark inside and told me to open to that passage.

“When you get home, I want you to read that poem out loud several times and a week from now you will give me a report. I want you to tell me what it means.”

I would have been more thrilled about a root canal or raking leaves or throwing my paper route at 4 am in the rain.

However, she didn’t want me to analyze the poem, like I was “laying pipe,” but to tell her what it meant. Meaning. Maybe I could work with that.

The poem she assigned me was “Ulysses.”

And that changed everything.

Mrs. Holman started giving me other poems to read that weren’t assigned to the rest of the class. They were poems about life from a man’s perspective. “Dulce et Decorum Est,” the most famous poem of World War I, was written by Wilfred Owen, a British soldier, and widely acknowledged as that war’s finest poet. It was the last poem he ever wrote. Owen was killed in battle on November 4, 1918, just one week before the Armistice.

The poem brought me to tears.

Other poems followed.
“The Charge of the Light Brigade”
“Dover Beach”
“O Captain! My Captain!”
“If”
“Invictus”
“Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night”

And I was hooked.

The wise and cunning Mrs. Holman had won!

Years later, I became a double major in History … and English. And I never forgot the great influence of a teacher with passion and love.

On the last day of 8th grade, Mrs. Holman went around the classroom saying good-bye and good luck to each of us. When she got to me, she shook my hand and smiled. I said, “Thank you for everything, Mrs. Holman!” And she looked straight at me, paused, leaned in closer, and then said in a low voice, almost a whisper, so that others couldn’t hear: “Tony Ludlow, I expect greatness from you.”

Wait, what? You expect WHAT??

What was I supposed to say to that? What was anyone supposed to say to that?

“Yes, ma’am,” I said, as if I was going to run right out that afternoon and perform ‘greatness.’

I was an average student, an ordinary, skinny, knucklehead kid with a ton of irreverent goofiness, with no visible means of greatness. Zero. I was a very average boy, from a very average family, living in a typically average Arkansas town. So why did she say that to me? I didn’t hear her say that to anyone else! Why did she burden me with such a thing?

Over the years, I’ve never believed, despite all of my feigned cockiness and false bravado, that I’ve ever achieved greatness. But I came to believe that the “burden” Mrs. Holman charged me with that day was intended to serve as a compass marker, a way to orient the map of my life, a process by which to plot a course. It was intended to serve as momentum and enthusiasm toward good and honorable things.

Greatness travels with passion. Have you ever seen one without the other? And they have nothing to do with a person’s zip code or bank balance. I find that passion may be the single most attractive thing in a person.

A passion for things. A lust for life. A thirst for knowledge. A positive orientation to the world. These things are magnetic and winsome! Be those things and the world will find you! Be the opposite of those things and the world will avoid you.

I’ve never achieved greatness, but I know that Mrs. Holman did. She was greatness, and love, and light and she poured a little bit of those things into every child she taught!

Thank you, Mrs. Holman. I’ll always love you for investing your life in me and giving me a love for the written word.

“We are not now that strength which in old days
Moved earth and heaven, that which we are, we are;
One equal temper of heroic hearts,
Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will
To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.” ~ “Ulysses,” Alfred Lord Tennyson

… and not to yield.
… and not to yield.

… and not to yield.

– 30 –

—————————–

Patreon

Through the years, people have been super supportive of USMC Fitness Boot Camp and all that I do through it. Almost weekly, I’ll hear from some former boot camper who’s moved away. They write saying how significant the program was to them and how much they enjoy getting these newsletters.

Some of those folks still live in Memphis but life and circumstances have “providentially” hindered them from coming back to the Quarterdeck. (This sounds better than “they got lazy and got out of the habit.”)

Sometimes, those who’ve moved away send money because they want to be helpful and to support the program. This happened just a few days ago. Sometimes these folks know that at any point in time, there are about half a dozen boot campers coming for free because they lost their job, or there’s been some other detrimental change in their finances and situation and would otherwise have to drop out boot camp.

I support different causes and organizations, like you do. But last year I started supporting two different people on a site called Patreon. It’s a way to support artists, musicians, writers, and others who produce content of a broad nature, but might not be able to continue without financial support from patrons … like how educators, artists, musicians, and others were supported by patrons back in the day.

Today, the work produced by members of Patreon is found in printed materials, blog posts, YouTube videos, face to face instruction, consultation, reviews, lectures, and any number of outlets. I support the two I mentioned because I like what they do and want to help.

I’ve been encouraged to join Patreon myself, giving folks who aren’t actively in the program (or even those who are), an opportunity to support the program in small automatic monthly amounts.

More about that later!

————————————

TODAY’S NUTRITION TALK

by First Sergeant Ashley Holloway, Registered Dietitian, LDN, MS.

(A Registered Dietitian has a BS in Food Science, followed by a one-year internship through an accredited university, and then with the recommendation of the internship program’s supervisor, a national examination is required. After that, an RD must have continuing education units annually in order to remain active and registered. An RD is an expert, not a hobbyist or a “food enthusiast.”)

is-peanut-butter-healthy-v2-2

Hi, my name is Ashley Holloway and I LOVE peanut butter! So much so, that I eat peanut butter at least six out of seven days! Many people mistakenly think that peanut butter is fattening or unhealthy, but that is not the case. Peanut butter is chock full of good nutrition and can be beneficial to your health!

Here is the down low on peanut butter from fellow Dietitian, Nancy Clark:

PB is not inherently fattening. While any food eaten in excess can be fattening, people who eat PB (and nuts, for that matter) five or more times a week are not fatter than nut avoiders. That’s because peanuts and PB are satiating; they help you feel pleasantly fed. Peanut eaters tend to intuitively eat less at other times of the day.

PB offers many health benefits. The fat in PB is primarily health-promoting mono- and poly- unsaturated fat that knocks down inflammation. For athletes who get micro-injuries every time they train, an anti-inflammatory food such as PB is a wise choice.

The fat in PB helps absorb the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K. You want to include some (healthful) fat in each meal; PB is a painless way to do so!

If you are an endurance athlete, such as a marathoner or cyclist, you’ll optimize your sports diet by eating at least 0.5 grams fat per pound of body weight. You’ll use it for fuel during extended exercise. PB in oatmeal before a long bike ride or a PB & J sandwich on a long bike ride are yummy and healthy ways to enjoy adequate dietary fat.

PB is a good source of arginine, an amino acid that helps keep blood vessels flexible so that blood flows more easily and reduces blood pressure. The more PB you eat, the bigger the effect on health protection.

What’s good for the heart is also good for the brain. Research suggests PB eaters improve their brain-blood circulation and mental function. This contributes to enhanced processing speed and better short-term memory. Eating PB and nuts today is a wise investment in your future brain health.

PB contains numerous bioactive compounds (phenols) that bolster the immune system. Spanish peanuts and shell peanuts are particularly wise snack choices because the peanut skin is rich in anti-oxidants and fiber.

Is all natural peanut butter far better than Skippy of Jif? All types of PB need to meet a “standard of identity” as defined by the USDA. Conventional brands might have 2% added saturated fat (palm oil, hydrogenated oils) to control the oil from separating. This small amount does not over-ride the positive health benefits of PB.

What about all the sugar added to Skippy and Jiff PB? “All” that sugar is only 2 or 3 grams. That’s nothing compared to the 10 to 15 grams of sugar in the jelly or honey you might enjoy with the PB, or the 6 g sugar in the sandwich bread. Regardless, sugar fuels your muscles. Please fret less about added sugar and focus more on PB’s zinc, folate, vitamin E, niacin, and selenium. It is nutrient-rich.

What about the sodium in PB? The 150 mg. sodium in a serving of PB is less than the sodium you get in one slice of bread or 12-ounces of Gatorade.

But what if I can’t eat just one spoonful…? If you stay away from PB because you can’t eat just a reasonable serving, think again. Overindulging in PB means you like it; you should eat it more often! By enjoying PB at every meal, in a few days, you will stop craving it. No more binges! Avoiding peanut butter just sets you up for “last chance eating.” You know, I just blew my diet by eating PB so I’d better keep eating it. Last chance before I go back on my diet. Denial and deprivation of PB lead to overeating. Do not deny yourself of this yummy sports food. You will deprive your body of valuable health benefits!

———————————–

REMIND!

I’ve recently signed up for the messaging app called Remind. Designed with schools in mind, it is easily adaptable for groups and organizations like ours.

Signing up is free and easy. Your privacy is ensured and there will be no group text situations that makes us all crazy! I’m the only one who can reply to everyone. Any messages from you will only go to me, not to the whole group.

I’ll only utilize this messaging service to inform you of any changes to venue or times. Likewise, I’ll use it, in addition to Facebook, to announce any weather related cancellations or changes.

Just copy and paste this link into your browser to sign up: remind.com/join/usmcfi

————————————-

What would you do if money was not an issue, fear was not a factor, and failure was not an option?
To your optimum health and fitness!

SEE YOU ON THE QUARTERDECK!

Tony

Sergeant Major Tony Ludlow
USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP, Commanding
Mailing address: 4888 Southern Ave., Memphis, TN 38117
Cell Phone: 901-644-0145

Posted by Tony Ludlow | in Uncategorized | No Comments »


Order in the Wild West — blog post of Sgt. Tony Ludlow 3/1/2018

Mar. 2nd 2018

9d39db78f28a9481ba3edb2c6c3bdbef--robert-conrad-the-wild-wild-west

The history of technology outpacing man’s ability to adapt to it successfully is full of mankind’s slow response.

Humans seem to develop new technologies faster than we can understand them, accept them, and seamlessly, or usefully, absorb them and put them to their maximum use. The Luddites and Neo-Luddites just reject them out of hand.

The Internet, though we’ve had it for years, still feels like the wild west.

The kind of civility we see in polite company hardly exists at times on the Internet. Our sense of propriety seems out of step with the technology. In many ways, the Internet has degraded communication and corrupted it. We’ve all seen conversation threads on social media go from casual politeness to full on rude and disrespectful in seconds … between strangers!

Not to mention the atrocious grammar and spelling!

In no other period in history has there ever been a time when so many can speak directly to so many. And with that access, with everyone having a megaphone, the yelling and lack of propriety have become dishearteningly common place. Everyone wants to argue and confront one another. Everyone is right. No one is wrong. No one is listening. Everyone is confrontational.

It’s also one of the many reasons I don’t watch cable “news” of any kind. “We’re right! They’re wrong!” Finger pointing and labeling of people. No one is listening. No one is thinking for themselves. Everyone is parroting back the talking points they heard on cable news. Everyone’s got their mic keyed. Everyone is yelling. Too many “Christians” shamefully involved.

“So little love for our neighbor.
So much hatred and anger.”

And lately we learn to what extent this kind of hatred and anger are promoted on social media by Russian operatives intent on division and deceit among us.

There’s a cartoon that shows a stick figure-we’ll call him Kevin-sitting at a computer screen and the caption goes something like this: “Here’s Kevin. Kevin sees something on the Internet he doesn’t like. Kevin ignores it and moves on with his life. Kevin is smart. Be like Kevin.”

I also try to remember that, during my life, every major change of my mind, be it theological, intellectual, political, ideological, or cultural did not come as a result of me losing an argument. It came as a result of being challenged to think.

For the most part, arguments quickly degenerate from an exchange of differing views to a defense of egos. All that we believe, we believe to be true and right. No one ever says, “I know I’m wrong about ‘xyz,’ but I’m going to tenaciously hold on to it and believe it anyway.”

I like the “Be like Kevin” advice. But it’s a little too simplistic and narrow. Sometimes things posted on social media ought to be confronted and corrected. Errors in information and misinformation, that could be detrimental to someone’s health and safety, need to be corrected.

Until the investigation into Russian meddling into the life, elections, and affairs of our country, I’d have opposed hate speech, racism, bigotry, lies, and evil. But now we see that our lives, our unity, and our elections have been manipulated, controlled, and damaged by a foreign and belligerent power.

Our First Amendment Rights have been used by Russian subversives to sow dissension, division, and hate among us and to assist certain people to political power and others to political ruin. War without a bullet being fired. Democracy duped and captured without even knowing we were in a fight.

If the current investigation by Robert Mueller and his staff have revealed anything, it’s that differences in genuine political orientation, religion, personal preferences, and opinion aren’t the things you ought to confront on Facebook with strangers. We used to tell our children not to talk to strangers. That’s wisdom for adults online today!

Similarly, let’s say my friend likes jazz but I think jazz is noise. He shares a jazz song on Facebook. I either “Like” it or I move on. I don’t comment under that song saying that jazz sucks. Why in the world would I do that? Just because we’re friends in real life or “Facebook friends,” doesn’t make it right to oppose his tastes or views on whatever he posts. His page, his rules! Irrespective of my opinions.

Ashley and I saw a movie and I posted on Facebook that we liked it. Almost immediately some guy commented, telling me I was wrong, that the movie was crap. What? Seriously? It’s just an opinion about a movie. It’s like criticizing someone for not liking chocolate ice cream or for having a preference for Nike running shoes.

Internet etiquette is either dying or in its infancy. It’s hard to know if we’re seeing the end of civility online, or we’re at the beginning of a new sense of online decorum, an unintended result of Russian obstruction.

Occasionally, a friend of mine will post something on social media that I think might be in error or something that might be factually wrong and need correction or alteration. If the correction is easy and won’t hurt anyone’s feelings, I’ll post it.

For example, if my friend posts that “Pink Floyd” is going to be in concert in St. Louis, and I know he’s mistaken, that it’s actually “Brit Floyd” who is going to be in concert, I’ll post something publicly like, “Hey man, that’s good info about the concert, but is it ‘Brit Floyd’ or ‘Pink Floyd’ who’s going to be in concert?”

And here’s a little tip that might be helpful: avoid using the second person singular pronoun “you,” when calling attention to someone’s error or fault or possible mistake. “You never listen to me!” has a different feel than “I sometimes don’t feel heard.”

In the case of “Pink Floyd,” I could use “you” without it sounding too confrontational or pedantic by saying, “Did you mean ‘Brit Floyd’ or ‘Pink Floyd’?” Even using the word “Did” as opposed to “Do,” in the previous example has a different nuance.

If my friend has shared something that I believe is in error, and I fear that any kind of public question or correction could be embarrassing to him, I’ll send him a private message if I think it’s that important. (The Marine Corps is big on public praise and private correction. So am I.)

“Hey, Bob, you posted something on Facebook about eating raw eggs, can you tell me more about that? Can you tell me how you came to this way of eating eggs?” I might write that in a private message or email. (Stephen Covey’s: “Seek first to understand, then to be understood.”) Rather than post on Bob’s timeline: “Hey, Bob, eating raw eggs is wackadoodle stupid thinking, man! You ain’t Rocky! You’re gonna make yourself sick!” That’s disrespectful to Bob … and probably none of my business! Now, if I genuinely want to understand the whole eating raw eggs thing, I’ll send Bob a private message and ask him about it.

We need to ask better questions.

That last statement is at the heart of good communication and relationship building: ask better questions. Seek first to understand, then to be understood.

But every day you see rude, cruel, disrespectful, uncalled for criticism and negative commentary, written for the world to see, some of it coming from complete strangers cowering behind the anonymity of a keyboard hundreds of miles away, coming from some distant friend of a friend of a friend, saying unnecessary things they think will have no consequence, no repercussion. It’s reprehensible and cowardly, at best.

And it does have repercussions and consequences in the real world.

And it’s not always strangers (or Russians) miles away. Sometimes it’s a former co-worker, a distant relative, or even some long-ago forgotten friend or classmate. But what they all have in common is that their unwanted, unnecessary, and unkind commentary is also unsolicited.

Here’s an analogy for social media that might be helpful.

Imagine that Facebook is like a nice restaurant. The people at my table (my friends) are the people I’m going to share with and with whom I’m going to interact. If I overhear a conversation in the booth behind me that I don’t agree with, I won’t interject myself into their conversation, even if one of my friends at my table knows someone at that other table (friends of my friends). I don’t correct those people at that other table, I don’t make fun of them, I don’t call them names, I don’t chastise them, I don’t even engage them. Nor do they come over to my table and do those things. Their conversation is none of my business, even if I overhear them say things I don’t agree with. If they all think jazz is great and all of them are eating raw eggs, that’s none of my business.

The online world may seem artificial, but the damage that can be done to relationships in the real world isn’t.

At my age, I’m supposed to have sage advice. So, here are my 10 Rules for Internet Etiquette, with particular application to Facebook.

Should I Comment, Or Move On?
1. Were you asked for your opinion or commentary? If “NO,” move on.
2. Were you tagged in the post? If “NO,” move on.
3. Were you mentioned by name in the post? If “NO,” move on.
4. Will your life be negatively impacted if you don’t say something? If “NO,” move on.
5. Can you “Like” that post and write something positive and helpful? If “NO,” move on.
6. Have you had interaction with this person in the past few months? If “NO,” move on.
7. Are you an expert in the subject that’s being discussed? If “NO,” move on. (A brief note about your expertise: your resume says what you’re an expert in.)
8. Is the thing you’re going to write something you’d say to that person face to face? If “NO,” move on.
9. Is the thing you’re going to write true, respectful, necessary, useful, encouraging? Should YOU be the one to say it? If “NO,” move on.
10. Would you welcome that person writing the same thing on your wall, timeline, post, etc.? If “NO,” move on.

Here’s another tip: if you’ve not interacted with a person on Facebook when they celebrated a birthday,
or when they grieved the death of a loved one
or beloved pet,
or congratulated them when they got a promotion,
or rejoiced with them when they took that long awaited vacation,
or cheered for them when they got into the college of their dreams,
or admired them when they started raising chickens,
or shared in their happiness when they bought an old classic car,
or praised them when they ran a race they’d trained for,
or expressed your love for them when they had a new baby, etc., etc. …
… then don’t blindside them with some negative or confrontational comment that will literally come out of left field from their perspective. And is sure to be hurtful and confusing.

This has happened to me.

Some person I haven’t seen in 20 years, and who I had completely forgotten was a Facebook friend, comes out of the woodwork to tell me that I’m wrong about my love of Captain Crunch or they tell me they hate Notre Dame. Both things have happened.

“Treat others as THEY want to be treated,” says the platinum rule. Build one another up. Encourage one another. And remember what my Mom (and probably yours too) said,

“If you can’t say anything nice, then don’t say anything at all.”

And I like what is written in the New Testament book of Ephesians: “And be ye kind, one to another, tenderhearted …” Ephesians 4:32 (KJV)

– 30 –

————————————–

Patreon

Through the years, people have been super supportive of USMC Fitness Boot Camp and all that I do through it. Almost weekly, I’ll hear from some former boot camper who’s moved away. They write saying how significant the program was to them and how much they enjoy getting these newsletters.

Some of those folks still live in Memphis but life and circumstances have “providentially” hindered them from coming back to the Quarterdeck. (This sounds better than “they got lazy and got out of the habit.”)

Sometimes, those who’ve moved away send money because they want to be helpful and to support the program. This happened just a few days ago. Sometimes these folks know that at any point in time, there are about half a dozen boot campers coming for free because they lost their job, or there’s been some other detrimental change in their finances and situation and would otherwise have to drop out boot camp.

I support different causes and organizations, like you do. But last year I started supporting two different people on a site called Patreon. It’s a way to support artists, musicians, writers, and others who produce content of a broad nature, but might not be able to continue without financial support from patrons … like how educators, artists, musicians, and others were supported by patrons back in the day.

Today, the work produced by members of Patreon is found in printed materials, blog posts, YouTube videos, face to face instruction, consultation, reviews, lectures, and any number of outlets. I support the two I mentioned because I like what they do and want to help.

I’ve been encouraged to join Patreon myself, giving folks who aren’t actively in the program (or even those who are), an opportunity to support the program in small automatic monthly amounts.

More about that later!

————————————

TODAY’S NUTRITION TALK

by First Sergeant Ashley Holloway, Registered Dietitian, LDN, MS.

(A Registered Dietitian has a BS in Food Science, followed by a one-year internship through an accredited university, and then with the recommendation of the internship program’s supervisor, a national examination is required. After that, an RD must have continuing education units annually in order to remain active and registered. An RD is an expert, not a hobbyist or a “food enthusiast.”)

Time for a Gut Check

As runners we train for our races. We run the hills. We run in the cold. We run in the heat. We run the long miles. We run with the new shoes weeks before the big day. All the preparation is done with the goal of having a good race day. As runners we do a great job of training our minds, muscles, and lungs. But often we fail to also train our guts.

It isn’t uncommon for me to hear a runner say that they don’t eat before they run because they are afraid of getting diarrhea or of throwing up if they run with food in their stomach. But these same people then struggle with the last miles of their long run because they are running on fumes.

Stomach and gastro-intestinal issues are pretty common. Approximately 30-50% of endurance athletes (including up to 90% of distance runners) have had gastro-intestinal issues during and after bouts hard exercise. Gastric issues such as bloating, gas, side-stitches, nausea, stomach cramps/pain, vomiting, diarrhea, and the sudden urge to run to the nearest porta-potty are all things they fear.

The reason these issues arise during long runs is because blood flow to the gut is decreased for an extended period of time and is instead diverted to places where it’s needed most, like your muscles and your cardiovascular system. The decreased blood flow, combined with dehydration, elevated body temperature, and high levels of stress hormones, can all cause your normal intestinal function to stop suddenly.

If you are a runner with a sensitive stomach, you may think that limiting your food and beverage intake, before and during your run is the way to go. No food equals no issues, right? It may temporarily stop the problem, but it doesn’t solve the problem. By learning how to properly train your gut to accept food and liquids both before and during a run can improve your running performance without the fear of needing to make unwelcome pit stops.

The good news is that our gastrointestinal systems are fairly easy to train. Think about competitive eaters. They eat enormous amounts of food in amazingly short amounts of time. World Champion eater Joey Chesnut consumed 40 and a half slices of pizza in only 10 minutes. And another competitive eating champ consumed 72 hot dogs in that same amount of time. These two didn’t just go out on competition day and eat these massive amounts with no training. They had to spend a lot of time to train their stomachs to handle these crazy amounts.
Thankfully as runners, we don’t need to aspire to that level of gut training. But in order to be fueled properly for optimum performance without the risk of stomach upset or issues, some training is needed.

Try any of the following tips from fellow Sports Dietitian, Nancy Clark, RD, CSSD, that can help you exercise with digestive peace:

Drink enough fluids. Dehydration triggers intestinal problems. Your goal is to drink enough to prevent 2% dehydration (sweat loss of 2 pounds per 100 pounds of body weight from pre- to post-exercise). If you are a “big guy” who sweats heavily, this can be a lot of fluid. For example, a 200-pound football player could easily lose 4 pounds (a half-gallon) of sweat in an hour of exercise. He needs to train his gut to handle fluid replacement during training. He could need as much as 12 to 16 ounces every 15 minutes during a two-hour practice.

Feeling “full” and “bloated” during exercise indicates fluids (and foods) have not emptied from the stomach. This commonly happens during really hard exercise, when reduced blood flow to the stomach delays stomach emptying. Hot weather and prolonged exercise in the heat can also reduce stomach emptying.

You want to dilute highly concentrated carbs (i.e., gels), so be sure to drink enough water during exercise (i.e. 16 oz. water per 100 calories gel). This will help speed up gastric emptying.

If you plan to eat a peanut butter on a bagel before you compete, you want to routinely eat that before important training sessions. This helps train your gut to accommodate fat (sustained energy) as well as carbs (quick energy).

Once carbohydrate (such as sport drink, gel, banana, or gummi bears) empties from the stomach, it enters the small intestine and is broken down into one of three simple sugars (glucose, fructose, galactose). These sugars need “taxi cabs” to get transported out of the intestine and into the blood stream.

Too many gels or chomps without enough transporters can lead to diarrhea. By training with your race-day carbs, you can increase the number of transporters.

If you typically eat a low-carb Paleo or keto-type diet and then on the day of, let’s say, a marathon, you decide to fuel with carb-rich gels and sports drinks, your body won’t have the capacity to optimally transport the sugar (carbs) out of your intestines and to your muscles. You could easily end up with diarrhea.

When planning what to eat during extended exercise, choose from a variety of carbs with a variety of sugars (i.e., sport drink, gum drops, and maple sugar candy). This helps prevent the glucose transporters from getting saturated. Too much of one kind of sport food can easily create GI problems.

Real foods” such as bananas, raisins and cereal, have been shown to be as effective as commercial sport foods. Your body processes “real food” every day and has developed a good supply of transporters to deal with the carbohydrate you commonly eat. By experimenting and learning what works best for your body, you can fuel without anxiety about undesired pit stops.

For exercise that lasts for up to two hours, research suggests about 60 grams (240 calories) of carb per hour can empty from the small intestine and get into the blood stream. Hence, that’s a good target. For longer, slower, events, the body can use 90 g (360 calories) carb per hour from multiple sources, as tolerated. Again, train your gut!

The bottom line:
Train with relatively large volumes of fluid to get your stomach used to that volume.
Routinely eat carbohydrate-based foods before training sessions to increase your body’s ability to absorb and use the fuel.
During training, practice your race-day fueling. Mimic what you might eat before the actual competitive event and tweak it until you find the right balance.
If you are concerned about diarrhea, in addition to preventing dehydration, limit your fiber intake for a few days pre-event (fewer whole grains, fruits and veggies).
Reducing your intake of onions, garlic, broccoli, apples, and sorbitol might help reduce GI issues during exercise.
Meet with a sports dietitian to help you create a fueling plan that promotes intestinal peace and better performance.

———————————–

REMIND!

I’ve recently signed up for the messaging app called Remind. Designed with schools in mind, it is easily adaptable for groups and organizations like ours.

Signing up is free and easy. Your privacy is ensured and there will be no group text situations that makes us all crazy! I’m the only one who can reply to everyone. Any messages from you will only go to me, not to the whole group.

I’ll only utilize this messaging service to inform you of any changes to venue or times. Likewise, I’ll use it, in addition to Facebook, to announce any weather related cancellations or changes.

Just copy and paste this link into your browser to sign up: remind.com/join/usmcfi

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What would you do if money was not an issue, fear was not a factor, and failure was not an option?
To your optimum health and fitness!

SEE YOU ON THE QUARTERDECK!

Tony

Sergeant Major Tony Ludlow
USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP, Commanding
Mailing address: 4888 Southern Ave., Memphis, TN 38117
Cell Phone: 901-644-0145

Posted by Tony Ludlow | in Uncategorized | No Comments »


Passion and Fire! — Sgt. Tony Ludlow’s blog post for 2/22/2018

Feb. 22nd 2018

IMG_3111

I’m an Olympian. As many of you know.

Well … not really … but sort of.

I was at the Winter Olympics in Lillehammer, Norway for the 2 weeks of the 1994 Games. (Translation: I was in Norway freezing my booty off!!) And at the Nagano Games in Japan in 1998.

No, I wasn’t competing in the two-man luge. (How do those teams even come together? How does one man ask another man to lay on top of him on a sled sliding down a mountain at 90 MPH?) I was in Norway as a goodwill ambassador (seriously!!) from Japan — believe it or not — as a hospitality translator for the Japanese Olympic Committee (the next winter games in ’98 were to be in Nagano, Japan). How I was chosen for such a position is a whole ‘nother story!

You might remember those Olympics because of the Tonya Harding / Nancy Kerrigan smack down. (I had my money on Tonya. Those trailer park girls know how to rumble!)

Lillehammer was an awesome experience and I got to meet a lot of the athletes, including Winston, a member of the Jamaican Bobsled Team, and Eddie “The Eagle” Edwards, an unlikely British ski jumper who came in dead last at the 1988 Calgary Games. I met General Norman Schwarzkopf, the Allied Commander in the first Gulf War, and Bruce Jenner, when he was still a dude.

I love the Olympics, Winter and Summer, and will watch just about any of the events, especially if an American or an American team has a chance at a medal. Sports that I’d never pay attention to ordinarily, like water polo or downhill skiing for example, get my full attention for 2 weeks every 4 years!

The Olympics are the celebration of years and years of intense hard work, daily sacrifices, and extreme determination.

Then there’s the drama of men and women overcoming obstacles, butterflies in their stomachs, and their own self-doubts in front of a worldwide audience!

It’s so compelling and more than a little addictive. I first got the Olympic bug in February 1972, watching the Winter Games in Sapporo, Japan from my house in Fort Smith, Arkansas. (I added “Go to the Olympics” and “Live in Japan” to my bucket list that February. Check and check!)

And whose heart doesn’t hurt when you see someone’s Olympic dream end, with the whole world watching, because of a misstep, a small mistake, or because their body just refused to cooperate on perhaps the most important day of their lives? It really is the full range of human emotions!

In Korea right now, there are hundreds of athletes who knew before they left their home country that they had no chance whatsoever of winning a medal. They knew it full well. But they went anyway. In Lillehammer and Nagano, I talked to dozens of those kinds of athletes and to a man (and to a woman) they all said the same thing, that they were honored to represent their country and that they were there to do their very best. Even when they knew that their very best would go unnoticed and get no acknowledgement from the press and that they would return home with no Olympic medal.

Not the case with Lindsey Vonn!

What more could be said about Ms. Vonn?

Even if you don’t know much about competitive skiing, you have to marvel at her achievement. She’s been called the greatest downhill skier of all time. And the injuries and setbacks she has faced are incredible:

BROKEN RIGHT ARM

FRACTURES IN LEFT KNEE

BROKEN LEFT ANKLE

TORN LIGAMENTS IN RIGHT KNEE

BROKEN BONE IN RIGHT LEG

CONCUSSION

BRUISED RIGHT SHIN

BRUISED LEFT FOREARM

CUT RIGHT THUMB

HYPER-EXTENDED RIGHT KNEE

BONE BRUISE

More than once Lindsey Vonn was airlifted from a ski competition when a crash at 80 MPH left her body broken. Let that sink in. More than once … air. lifted.

The list of her injuries, surgeries, and physical maladies would have made a lesser athlete give up. But there she is! The oldest female downhill skier of all time, at the old age of 33 years old, winning an Olympic medal!
Truthfully, there simply aren’t superlatives adequate enough to describe the accomplishments, passion, and drive of Lindsey Vonn!
With tears in her eyes, she intimated that this Olympics will probably be her last. But you could see the fire behind those tears. If she returns to the 2022 Games in Beijing, she would be 37 years old. And I wouldn’t put it past her.

Would that we all had the same fire and passion of athletes like Lindsey Vonn … or even Eddie “The Eagle” Edwards!

–30–

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INCLEMENT WEATHER POLICY

We’ll follow the decision of the Shelby County School System. If the public schools in Memphis close, we’ll stand down. However, if the decision to close school is based strictly on the temperature, as was the case recently, we will be ON!

We’ll be inside from now until after March Madness.

——————————————————————-

REMIND!

I’ve recently signed up for the messaging app called Remind. Designed with schools in mind, it is easily adaptable for groups and organizations like ours.

Signing up is free and easy. Your privacy is ensured and there will be no group text situations that makes us all crazy! I’m the only one who can reply to everyone. Any messages from you will only go to me, not to the whole group.

I’ll only utilize this messaging service to inform you of any changes to venue or times. Likewise, I’ll use it, in addition to Facebook, to announce any weather related cancellations or changes.

Just copy and paste this link into your browser to sign up: remind.com/join/usmcfi

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TUESDAY’S WORKOUTS

Our Tuesday workouts have become one of my favorite.

I need help coming up with a good and catchy name for it, like I have for some of the other workouts.

Any ideas?

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Some of you know that I’m working on a PhD and I’m about to enter into the last area of course work before starting to write my dissertation.

If you have an electronic copy of a qualitative dissertation, I’d love to take a look at it. If it’s really good, I’ll steal it and plagiarize the crap out of it! I’m joking, of course!

If you can help me out, my email address is: TonyLudlow@aol.com

——————————————-

To your good health and fitness,

Sgt. Tony Ludlow

Posted by Tony Ludlow | in Uncategorized | No Comments »


Angels! — Sgt. Tony Ludlow’s blog post for 2/15/2018

Feb. 15th 2018

IMG_3117

It’s a little misleading.

The 1994 Winter Games were in Lillehammer, Norway, but really they were sort of all over a 75 mile radius of Lillehammer. Kind of like events at a “Memphis Olympics” being held in Dyersburg and Tupelo.

The Korea Games haven’t been in PyeongChang only, but also at nearby mountains and other venues around PyeongChang. So it’s not so much a host city as it is a host area.

One day while I was in Lillehammer for the Olympics, my new friend Doug — who I’d met a few days earlier in the elementary school that had been turned into a hostel — and I took a bus the 60 or so miles south to the city of Hammer to the figure skating venue. Figure skating is a very popular event and the ’94 Games had the added drama brought on by Tonya Harding and her thug husband.

This particular day, it was just practice for the skaters, but even their practice sessions were popular! I met Nancy Kerrigan there — very sweet and friendly to everyone — and might have met Tonya too. But Tonya was aloof and stayed away from the fans. Plus, she looked like she might’ve been packin’ heat or a hubcap. Ms. Kerrigan actually posed for a picture for me.

I met Katarina Witt, the German Olympic Gold Medalist! (Katarina is maybe the hottest woman to ever lace up a pair of ice skates! I could be wrong about that, but that’s my story!) She was in the stands as a spectator and I just walked up to her and the small group of friends she was with and said, “HowUdooin?” She smiled and immediately yelled, “SECURITY!!!” hahaha Not really! She was class and elegance, beauty and charm and invited ME to sit with them! Sweeeeeeeeet!! I was a little star struck, I have to tell you. OK, I was a LOT star struck! (A beautiful athletic woman with depth, passion, and grace … how could I possibly resist?)

After the practice sessions that evening, Doug and I went in search of a bus to take us back to our hostel in Lillehammer. Somehow my friend and I got on the wrong bus. The bus schedule and our lack of understanding Norwegian led to our confusion. Of course we didn’t know it was the wrong bus until it stopped about half way to Lillehammer … literally in the middle of no where … and the driver deposited us out on the side of the road at about 9 PM. I can’t adequately describe exactly how “out in the middle of nowhere” this was. How could this remote outpost possibly be a bus stop? Seriously, there was NOTHING out there.

This turned out to be the last stop and the bus was empty except for the two of us knuckleheads. Doug and I desperately tried to explain to the driver that we needed to go on to Lillehammer, but apparently our English and caveman-like gestures made no sense to him. We even tried to stay on the bus to return to Hammer and start over, but the driver indicated that if we didn’t get off his bus he’d beat us with something heavy and hard. So, out we went into “the land of the ice and snow” … and there we stood like a couple of idiots watching the bus drive away.

Oops.

And so there we were. In. The. Middle. Of. No. Where. The full moon gave us a good view of the countryside and we could see nothing. No houses. No farms. No barns. No structures of any kind at all.

I started to imagine the obit in my hometown newspaper: “Tony Ludlow, local boy who done good, well, mediocre, died in Norway yesterday. Found frozen like a fudgesicle in a remote Norwegian forest.”

Standing there in the dark, on the side of a snow covered road, in the middle of who knows where, somewhere in snow covered freezing cold Norway, we tried to come up with a plan. Since Lillehammer was north of Hammer, and there would be no other buses coming, Doug and I figured we’d start walking north. What choice did we have?

Using the stars to determine north, we started walking. We’d trudged along for about 30 minutes in the dark, no houses in sight, no sounds, no cars, no signs of life … when at last we heard the sound of a single car coming up from behind us.

The car, a Toyota van, stopped and the driver, a middle aged Norwegian man who looked like a Viking, spoke to us in pleasant sounding Norwegian. I guess we looked lost and pathetic out there all alone walking in the Norwegian countryside. Inside the van were two other people. Doug and I pleaded, “Does anyone speak English?”

“Oh yaahh, vee kunn owl spekk Eeenglish.” the driver said excitedly. “Whare du yew gou?”

We explained our predicament and he told us to get in, that they were also going to Lillehammer as well! WOW! What luck, I thought. A ride back to a warm hostel, a hot shower, and some vending machine snacks for dinner. Not ideal, but waaaay better than how the obituary in my hometown newspaper would have described the alternative.

But that’s not exactly what happened. Our new friends didn’t intend to take us directly to Lillehammer. (Cue the scary “Law & Order” themed “DAUH DAUH!”)

Instead, Eyvandar and his wife Aleund and daughter Hedda took us to their home in Lillehammer and fed us, got us a little drunk and then robbed us.

NO! They didn’t rob us! They fed us until we were completely stuffed. We had reindeer, cheese, breads, jams, beer and a variety of all sorts of things I’d never heard of but found to be quite tasty. Vending machine snacks be damned!
Eyvander looked just like your quintessential Viking, long blond hair and beard, needing only a horned helmet and a battle axe to complete the look! Aleund and Hedda, a college student, looked like all pretty Norwegian women, long blond hair, rosy red cheeks, and crystal clear blue eyes.

Their home was warm and comfortable and looked like a chalet with exposed oak and pine walls and floors. There was an awesome fireplace that warmed the large room that was part kitchen, part dinning room, and part den. Our new friends asked us questions about America, the Olympics, and what our impressions of Norway were. They were so proud that the world had come to their doorstep! And they seemed even happier to be entertaining a couple of lost sojourners from America!

Sometime after midnight, they drove us to our hostel and as we were getting out of their car, thanking them and saying good night, Doug and I saw the most amazing sight! There in the northern sky was the aurora borealis, the Northern Lights! It was absolutely breathtaking and was the perfect end to a most unusual day!

What an incredible and amazing night! What an awesome unintended adventure!

Doug and I were a couple of lost, cold, hungry, and slightly worried guys dragging ourselves along in the dark, on the side of the road, in a foreign country … and three wonderful people drove up and took a chance on us. With nothing to commend us to their generosity or kindness, they extended themselves beyond anything we could have asked for and then seemed hurt when we tried to offer them money for their trouble. It was no trouble, they protested. It was their pleasure.

There’s an interesting verse in the Bible that goes like this: “Do not forget to entertain strangers, for by so doing, some people have entertained angels without knowing it.”

I’m pretty sure that Doug and I were the ones entertained by angels.

Good luck in Korea, Team Norway! I know there’s a wonderful family back home in Lillehammer cheering you on!

— 30 —
Tony Ludlow, USMC Fitness Boot Camp Memphis
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INCLEMENT WEATHER POLICY
We’ll follow the decision of the Shelby County School System. If the public schools in Memphis close, we’ll stand down. However, if the decision to close school is based strictly on the temperature, as was the case recently, we will be ON!

We’ll be inside from now until after March Madness.

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TODAY’S NUTRITION TALK

by First Sergeant Ashley Holloway, Registered Dietitian, LDN, MS.

(A Registered Dietitian has a BS in Food Science, followed by a one year internship through an accredited university, and then with the recommendation of the internship program’s supervisor, a national examination is required. After that, an RD must have continuing education units annually in order to remain active and registered. An RD is an expert, not a hobbyist or a “food enthusiast.”)

Do your Food Cravings Indicate a Nutritional Deficiency? Last week I was asked a great question. Could certain cravings be related to nutritional deficiencies? This person had seen a widely circulated chart on Facebook showing a list of cravings, the most likely nutrient deficiency related to that craving and what you should eat instead. One of the examples was the craving for chocolate.

It said that if you craved chocolate then what you needed was magnesium, and instead of chocolate you should eat nuts, seeds, veggies, and fruit. Is there any truth to this? If our cravings were an indicator of deficiencies in any kind of nutrient, we would all be craving fruits and vegetables. However, we all tend to crave either high fat, high salt or sugar, and high carbohydrate comfort foods.

This fact, along with scientific research is a pretty good indicator that cravings are not related to nutritional deficiencies. Research shows that cravings are most often related to social rather than nutritional cues. We often crave foods associated with happy memories, especially those from our childhood. Brownies, macaroni and cheese, grilled cheese and soup are common childhood comfort foods.There is one exception, if you find yourself craving ice or craving unusual items such as cornstarch, dirt, clay, or laundry detergent (a condition called pica) then you may actually be iron deficient.

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FACEBOOK RESULTS!!!!!!!

WE HAVE OVER 4000 LIKES ON FACEBOOK!

Invite your friends to “like” our USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP Facebook page. You can do that directly from our Facebook page. Just go to the page and you’ll see a section on the right that will allow you to easily invite your friends to like the page. In particular, your Memphis friends!

This may be the first seed to sow in helping a friend get back into exercise and fitness! They can get exposed to what goes on, they’ll be more likely to make a change and maybe even join you on The Quarterdeck!

Encourage your friends and family to “Like” the page! It might motivate your friends and family to take charge of their lives!

Keep on checking in! Keep on tagging your friends! Over 50% of new members over the past 6 months have listed Facebook as the source where they first heard about us!

Thanks, everyone!

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MAKE A $&(#&@^#!*% FACE!!!!
INCREASE YOUR WEIGHTS!
YOU GET OUT WHAT YOU PUT IN!
What you get out of the workouts is determined by you.
How much do you work? How much effort you put into trying to do all of the repetitions with proper form and how much weight you’re using will determine what you get out of each workout.
YOU DETERMINE WHETHER YOUR WORKOUT IS HALF-ASS OR KICKASS!
It’s time for you to go up in weights … that’s what I’m thinking!
MAKING A FACE (THE GRIMACE) IS THE POOR MAN’S (OR WOMAN’S) FACELIFT!

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EVERY WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY IS T-SHIRT DAY!
WEAR YOUR RANK INSIGNIA SHIRT, SUB 7 SHIRT, OR OTHER USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP SHIRT!

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VETERAN BOOT CAMPERS!

Your rank insignia t-shirts look AWESOME on you! (Don’t forget to wear yours EVERY WEDNESDAY AND/OR THURSDAY, T-SHIRT DAY!
Every Wednesday is our Official BOOT CAMP T-SHIRT DAY! You can wear your rank insignia shirt anytime you‘d like, of course, but always every Wednesday!

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ARE WE FACEBOOK FRIENDS?

We should be!
HAVE YOU “LIKED” THE USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP FACEBOOK PAGE?
You should totally do that!

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BOOT CAMP DISCOUNT

If you set up an automatic payment at your bank (Boot Camp mailing address is 4888 Southern, Memphis 38117) you can subtract $10 off your fee! That’s right, instead of $75, you can pay $65!

(This is not an automatic bank draft that I set up with a voided check. This an automatic payment that you set up yourself.)

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USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP CLASSES

0530 Monday through Friday
0645 M-F
5:45 PM: Monday through Thursday, no evening class on Friday.

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BOOT CAMP DISCOUNTS AND FACEBOOK EXPERIMENT!

First of all, find me on Facebook and make me your friend. (Also, be sure to “like” USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP on Facebook.)
Here’s how the discount works!
It’s simple: make a Facebook status update and get a discount!
For every status update that you make that references:
“USMC Fitness Boot Camp,”
“Sgt. Tony’s Boot Camp,”
“Tony’s Boot Camp,”
or something similar, (there are fake boot camps out there) you can take $2.50 off your next reenlistment fee for each update!
You can take up to $20 off for any given month!
Your status update has to be a specific reference to USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP or to me specifically by name.
BE SURE TO TAG ME!
You can do the same thing by “checking in” at USMC Fitness Boot Camp either by using Facebook “places,” Foursquare, or any of the other “check in” apps that show up on your Facebook News Feed.
So log on and start getting your discounts now!

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Q. How can I get up in the morning on a consistent basis?
A. Contrary to what many think, I am NOT a morning person. I have to be “dynamited” out of the bed! Here are some tips to help you get going in the morning:
1. Use two alarm clocks. I have a snooze alarm that starts going off several minutes before I intend to get up. Then I have a “Last Call” alarm clock that is located across the room. This alarm clock is set to go off when I MUST get up.
2. Once the last call alarm goes off, the bed become OFF LIMITS! Get moving!
3. Get out of bed, turn off the alarm clock, and start turning on lights all through the house. Turn on the TV.
4. Lay out your clothes the night before. Don’t go wandering around the house in the morning trying to find your left shoe and your favorite shorts. So, have things ready the night before.

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What would you do if money was not an issue, fear was not a factor, and failure was not an option?
To your optimum health and fitness!

SEE YOU ON THE QUARTERDECK!

Tony

Sergeant Major Tony Ludlow
USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP, Commanding
Mailing address: 4888 Southern Ave., Memphis, TN 38117
Cell Phone: 901-644-0145

Posted by Tony Ludlow | in Uncategorized | No Comments »


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