Sergeant Tony's Blog

Archive for June, 2014

WHAT HAVE WE DONE?

Jun. 27th 2014

What have we done? I’ll tell ya!

Monday: “Double Trouble,”
Tuesday: “Mt. Fuji & Mt. Suribachi,”
Wednesday: “Lucky 13,”
Thursday: “BOGA,” and
Friday: “The Quarterdeck Standard.”

By week’s end we will have completely covered ALL 5 Elements of Fitness: 1. Muscle Strength & Stamina, 2. Cardio-respiratory Strength & Endurance, 3. Flexibility, 4. Agility/Coordination and, 5. Balance.

At the end of every BOGA workout, we have 5 quiet and uninterrupted minutes to pray, meditate, count our blessings — or our breaths –or simply be … I don’t know of any church service in town that gives you that opportunity. And few of us do that even once on our own in a month’s time.

Bad News: we don’t get better with age. We are not, unfortunately, like fine wine getting better as we get older. Physically, we’re like ships in need of constant repair and attention. Otherwise, rust and decay set in and rob us of our vitality. Every single one of us beyond the age of 25 who does not exercise, in particular not doing strength work, is in a state of atrophy, a state of deterioration. Muscle shrinks to the smallest size required to live a sedentary lifestyle.

Vibrancy ONLY comes through vigorous exercise!

Youth will cover a multitude of sins, but after that … you’ll have to work hard to stay healthy and strong and fit.

What state are you in? Deterioration or Vibrancy?

BE STRONG AND COURAGEOUS! See you on the Quarterdeck!

Posted by Tony Ludlow | in Uncategorized | No Comments »


Thank you, Willie Hall. — Sgt. Tony Ludlow, blog post for 6/25/2014

Jun. 25th 2014

The song begins with one of the most recognizable percussion rhythms in popular music.

A lot of songs are recognizable for their guitar riffs. Who can’t identify such classics as “Stairway to Heaven,” “Layla,” “Purple Haze,” “Johnny B. Goode,” ”Beat It,” or “Smoke on the Water” just by the guitar riff at the beginning of the song?

But the song I’m talking about is different. It begins with the hi-hat, the two cymbals that crash together operated by a pedal. When the drummer pushes down on the pedal with his foot and holds it, the cymbals stay together and the sound the drummer makes when he plays the hi-hat is distinctive. For this song, he plays a sixteenth note hi-hat ride pattern that every drummer has tried to copy. Myself included. Outside of “Wipeout” and “When the Levee Breaks,” there just aren’t that many songs that feature such a recognizable drum piece, that is, except the one Willie “Too Big” Hall played on Isaac Hayes’ “Shaft.”

I had the honor of meeting Isaac Hayes a few years ago. Living in Memphis, that wasn’t that far out of the realm of possibilities since Mr. Hayes lived here. So, if you got out enough or attended enough functions, you might’ve had the chance to meet him. Probably many of you did as well.

I was attending a banquet at the Hilton Hotel ballroom that honored folks who’d contributed to Memphis music. No banquet of that scope would have been complete without Isaac Hayes. After the banquet, he stayed around for a long time, eager to sign autographs and talk about music with his fans. I stood in a long line to meet him, all the while trying to decide what I’d say: “It’s a pleasure to meet you, Mr. Hayes, I’m a big fan.” Lame. “Hello, Mr. Hayes. I just love your music.” Lamer. “Uhhhhhhh …” (cricket sounds and Isaac Hayes looking at me as if I’m on drugs while I just stare at him with my mouth hanging open). Lamest.

Thing is, nothing I rehearsed sounded even remotely close to what I wanted to say, nor to what I actually did say. I can’t remember my exact words, but I know that I mentioned how as a young teen I slept with the radio on and how I’d automatically wake up in the middle of the night when “The Theme from Shaft” came on. And then I babbled on and on like a starstruck school girl and Mr. Hayes’ bodyguard had to escort me from the ballroom.

No, that’s not what happened. Isaac Hayes was gracious and listened patiently to me babble and thanked me for my rambling appreciation of his work, a work that truly meant something to me.

Music is one of those things that goes beyond the sounds and vibrations that enter our ears. Music touches the soul. I took “Music Appreciation” in college and thought it redundant. Who doesn’t appreciate music? Music delivers on its promises. A love song, a sad song, a powerful song, a dramatic song, a contemplative song, an angry song (do you hear me, Ani DiFranco and Alanis Morissette?) can have an immediate impact on our emotions and even on our athletic performances. And what would church be like without the great hymns of the faith or the great spirituals of the South that get people excited? What service in your average Baptist church would be complete without the singing of some sad and woeful song accompanied by the minister’s impassioned appeal for folks to walk the aisle and “come home”? And imagine a movie like “Jaws” or “Star Wars” or “Inception” without their soundtracks! Why, just the beginning of the “Jaws” music is enough to get me scared! And try not to shed a tear at the end of “Field of Dreams” when the music plays while Ray and John have a catch and the camera pans out to reveal all of those cars in a line!

For me, music and exercise (athletics) have similar properties. They deliver on their promises. Both have a way of altering our moods, touching our souls, and reorienting our perspectives.

In a recent conversation, the question came up about why some people seem to have no life management skills whatsoever, but others do. Why do some people seem to live in a world of such chaos and dysfunction, but others don’t? Why do some people seem to be clueless about how to live positive and productive lives, but others seem only able to make a mess of things, stir the pot, create drama, and go from one bad decision to the next, slow motion train wrecks. Or in some cases, train wrecks at the speed of sound and double the frequency.

As you might imagine, there are a lot of factors involved in how many arrive at, say, graduation from high school to then finding themselves miserable, in debt, in poor health, beaten down, and depressed … all before their 10 year reunion. For me, I’ve determined that the kind of music I’ve habitually listened to has had some bearing on my attitude and mood — as well as the kind of books I’ve read — but exercise has been the one constant in my life that has given me more than it promised. Abundantly more!

Where money has failed, exercise has succeeded. Where politics, ideologies, and religion have failed, exercise has succeeded. When self-help gurus have confused me, exercise has kept me grounded. When friends have abandoned me, exercise has sustained me. When the lights have gone out in my life and gloom has cast a horrible shadow over my mind, exercise has kept me sane and restored my hope. When stress, and grief, and the cares of the world have tried to choke the joy out of my being, exercise has cleared my head, wiped the slate clean, and rebooted my emotions. Nothing else in my life has had that kind of return on investment! Nothing.

With the near elimination of physical education in school, we MUST teach our children the joy and value of daily exercise! For the small amount of daily self-discipline invested, exercise will not only make their bodies healthier, but it will make their minds brighter, more focused, and strong! And it’ll do the same for everyone who gets up off the couch!

Encourage a friend or family member to get sweaty! The benefits far outreach the physical!

— 30 —

——————————————————————

“A nation that makes a great distinction between its scholars and its warriors, will have its laws made by cowards and its wars fought by fools.” ~ Thucydides

————————————————

BOGA FOR ALL TOMORROW

Don’t you think it’s time to move up in weights? Don’t you think that heavier dumbbells are in order?

————————————————

TODAY’S NUTRITION TALK
by Sergeant Ashley Holloway, Registered Dietitian, LDN

(A Registered Dietitian has a BS in Food Science, followed by a one year internship through an accredited university, and then with the recommendation of the internship program’s supervisor, a national examination is required. After that, an RD must have continuing education units annually in order to remain active and registered. An RD is an expert, not a hobbyist or a “food enthusiast.”)

DRINK UP!

“The heat of summer is here! We all know that we need to drink water to stay cool, but exactly how much is needed to keep hydrated?

Drinking too little can lead to headaches, fatigue, and delirium, all of which are symptoms of dehydration.

Drinking way too much water can cause confusion, seizures and respiratory arrest, which can be symptoms of hyponatremia or low sodium. Both of these conditions can be life threatening. But, figuring out daily fluid requirements can be confusing.

For most people relying on thirst to let us know when we need to take a drink is enough to meet our basic fluid needs. In 2004, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) put out guidelines for fluid needs. The IOM recommends that women get an average of 2.7 liters (91 ounces) of fluid a day, and men should average 3.7 liters (125 ounces) a day.

Surprisingly, 20% of our hydration needs are met by the foods we eat (since all foods contain some amount of water). The other 80% can be met from a variety of fluids, not just water. Caffeinated beverages including coffee and sodas do count towards our daily total. The IOM did say that extra fluids may be needed for exercise and hot weather conditions, but no specific guidelines were set. So how do we figure out how much fluid we need when we exercise?

A few years ago, the USA Track and Field (USATF) announced a major change in their hydration guidelines for long-distance runners. It is no longer recommend that we drink as much as possible to try and “stay ahead of our thirst.” Instead, they recommend that we start exercising when we are well hydrated – indicated by clear urine – and then we should drink when we become thirsty.

They recommend that all runners, especially long distance runners who complete marathons in four hours or more, should drink in a one-to-one ratio. This means drinking one liter of fluid for every liter of fluid that is lost through sweating. Just trying to guess how much water is lost by sweating can leave a person a little on the dry side.

One of the best ways to figure out just how much fluid is needed during a run or race lasting an hour or more is by taking the USATF’s Self Testing Program for Optimal Hydration. This test uses a formula to determine how much fluid is needed based on a person’s weight, weather conditions and exercise intensity.

You can find this self-test at: http://www.usatf.org/groups/coaches/library/2007/hydration/USATFSelfTestingProgramForOptimalHydration.pdf

For those shorter runs and for some general hot-weather fluid tips, the American College of Sports Medicine offers the following guidelines:
Before exercise: Try to drink plenty of fluids in the 24 hours before your exercise session and drink two or more cups of fluid two to three hours before exercise. This will help keep you hydrated while allowing your body time to eliminate any excess fluid before your exercise session begins.

During exercise: Drink 6 to 12 ounces of cool fluids (water is fine) every 15 to 20 minutes. If, however, you are to be exercising longer than 60 minutes, you may benefit from the extra carbohydrates and electrolytes from a sports drink. Adding a little sodium or salt (about 0.5 to 0.7 grams a liter) to your fluids for those runs lasting more than an hour can help increase your drive to drink and can help possibly ward off hyponatremia.

After exercise: Be sure to continue drinking after your exercise session is over. You can weigh yourself before and after your runs. Try to drink about 24 ounces of fluid for every pound lost. Be sure and include some sodium (salt) either in fluids or with the post- exercise meal. Sodium can help in the rehydration process and increase your desire to drink.

Knowing how much fluid we need is just as important as being fitted with the right running shoes or following the perfect training program. Too little or too much fluid can have serious, even life-threatening consequences. Be sure to know how to properly hydrate by following the above guidelines and by following your thirst.”

———————————————————

MAKE A $&(#&@^#!*% FACE!!!!

INCREASE YOUR WEIGHTS!

YOU GET OUT WHAT YOU PUT IN!

What you get out of the workouts is determined by you.

How much do you work? How much effort you put into trying to do all of the repetitions with proper form and how much weight you’re using will determine what you get out of each workout.

YOU DETERMINE WHETHER YOUR WORKOUT IS HALF-ASS OR KICKASS!

It’s time for you to go up in weights … that’s what I’m thinking!

MAKING A FACE (THE GRIMACE) IS THE POOR MAN’S (OR WOMAN’S) FACELIFT!

—————————————————

EVERY WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY IS T-SHIRT DAY!

WEAR YOUR RANK INSIGNIA SHIRT, SUB 7 SHIRT, OR OTHER USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP SHIRT!

—————————————————

SUB SEVEN CLUB!

Members of the Sub-7 Club are Boot Campers who’ve run the mile in under 7 minutes under my observation and timing.

Congratulations to the following members of the Sub Seven Club:

Corporal Lee Chase,
Corporal Chris McLelland,
Staff Sergeant Patrick Moore,
Staff Sergeant Rob Johnston,
Staff Sergeant Andrew Stolnicki,
Gunnery Sergeant Bart Thomas,
Staff Sergeant Dory Sellers,
Gunnery Sergeant Henry Kenworthy,
Master Sergeant John Winford,
First Sergeant Matt Green,
And Sergeant Major Andrew Forsdick.

—————————————————————

ACTIVE DUTY ROSTER OF VETERAN BOOT CAMPERS!

Are you coming up on promotion? Let me know! If you’ve been in the program for 6 months straight, you should be on the roster!

Every Wednesday is our Official BOOT CAMP T-SHIRT DAY! You can wear your rank insignia shirt anytime you‘d like, of course, but always every Wednesday!

The ACTIVE DUTY ROSTER

Under 6 months is a Private

Private First Class is more than 6 months but less than 1 year.
– Ashley Bowles 8/2013
– Greg Gaston 8/2013
– Steve Pike 9/2013
– Angela Moore 12/2013
– Jenn Bonner 12/2013
– Brett Bonner 1/2014

Over 1 year is a Lance Corporal
– Pam Torres – meritoriously promoted 12/2012
– Teresa Reed 2/2012*
– Emma Crystal 5/2012
– Megan Collins 6/2012
– Maria Wyatt 6/2012
– Susye Clark 7/2012
– Lora Gubanov 8/2012
– Orli Weisser-Pike 9/2012
– Morgan Johnson 10/2012
– ShaWanda Upshaw 10/2012
– Chuck Miller 11/2012
– Diane Gorney 12/2012
– Lexie Johnston 12/201?
– Ashley Summers 2/2014
– Ben Summers 2/2013
– Sam Lee 2/2013
– Louise Biedenharn 2/2013
– Jay Biedenharn 2/2013
– Ragan Washburn 2/2013
– Mary Holland Doan 4/2013
– Kay Barkoh 4/2013
– Melissa Campbell 4/2013
– Gina Tice 4/2013

Over 2 years is a Corporal
– Jeremy Harris 1/2009*
– Courtney Phillips 2/2011
– JD Dombroski 4/2011
– Carrie Schule 5/2011
– Bevan Lee 5/2011
– Mary Bauer 6/2011
– Lee Chase 7/2011
– Tait Keller 8/2011
– Heath Alderson 9/2011
– Lindsey Stanfill 9/2011
– Tara Ingram 11/2011
– Rachel Phillips 2/2012
– Jean Maskas 2/2012
– Keith Renard 4/2012
– Alan Compton 4/2012
– Steve Havard 5/2012
– Beth Stengel 2/2012
– Chris Kelley 6/2102

Over 3 years is a Sergeant
– Ashley McClure 7/2010
– Falana Scott 7/2010
– Jenni Harris 8/2010
– Anne Marie Wyatt 8/2010
– Tim Romanow 8/2010
– Paul Bauer 11/2010
– Robin Scott 3/2011
– Chris McLelland 3/2011
– Randal Rhea 4/2011
– Cindy King 4/2011
– Sherri Thompson 4/2011
– Melissa Thompson 5/2011
– Michelle Moss 5/2011
– Becky Lawler 5/2010*

Over 4 years is a Staff Sergeant
– Jonathan Phillips 10/2008*
– Robert Hunt 8/2009
– Cameron Mosley 11/2009
– Karen Massey 11/2009
– Cecelia DeLacy 2/2010
– Malinda Miller 3/2010
– Jay Mednikow 3/2010
– Ashley Holloway 4/2010
– Beth Mills 5/2010
– Emily Melonas 6/2010
– Keith Renard 6/2009*

Over 5 years is a Gunnery Sergeant
– Albo Carruthers 8/2008
– Anne Kenworthy 8/2008
– Patrick Moore 9/2008
– Jessie Flanders 1/2009
– Andrew Stolnicki 1/2009
– Paul Tronsor 3/2009

Over 6 years is a Master Sergeant
– Anne Mead 2/2005*
– Beth Rehrig 7/2007
– Matt Prince 6/2007
– Frank Jemison 10/2007
– Patty Dougherty 3/2008
– Oscar Adams 3/2008
– Alan Schaeffer 5/2008
– Mike Ryan 5/2006*
– Dory Sellers 6/2006*

Over 7 years is a First Sergeant
– Megan Warr 8/2006
– Rob Norcross 8/2006
– Kay Ryan 10/2006
– Michelle Crockett 3/2007
– George Rose 5/2007
– Henry Kenworthy 5/2007
– Leslie Garey 6/2007

Over 8 years is a Sergeant Major
– Louis Glazer 3/2005
– Gary Thompson 10/2005
– Scot Bearup 10/2005
– Kay Shelton 1/2006
– Leesa Jensen 5/2006

Over 9 years is a Warrant Officer 1
– Andrew Forsdick 9/2004
– Melissa Moore 2/2005
– Matt Green 5/2005
– Mike Barta 6/2005*
– Anne Emmerth 6/2005*

Over 10 years is a Chief Warrant Officer 2
– Buddy Flinn 7/2003
– Amy Singer 9/2003
– David Townsend 1/2004
– Hank Brown 3/2004

Over 11 years is a Chief Warrant Officer 3
– Pat McGhee 1/2003
– John Whittemore 1/2003
– Peter Pettit 5/2003

Battalion Executive Officer
Major Richard Bourland, 9/2003

* broken time

——————————————
ARE WE FACEBOOK FRIENDS?

We should be!

HAVE YOU “LIKED” THE USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP FACEBOOK PAGE?

You should totally do that!

———————————————

BOOT CAMP DISCOUNT

If you set up an automatic payment at your bank (Boot Camp mailing address is 4888 Southern, Memphis 38117) you can subtract $10 off your fee!

(This is not in conjunction with other discounts and is not an automatic bank draft that I set up with a voided check. This an automatic payment that you yourself set up yourself with your bank usually online and easy as pie!)

———————————————

USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP CLASSES

0530 Monday through Friday
(First and second Tuesday of the month are M-16 Workouts at CUMC. Third and fourth Tuesdays are Mt. Fuji Workouts at the U of M)
5:45 PM: Monday through Thursday, 5:30 on Friday.

————————————————

BOOT CAMP DISCOUNTS AND FACEBOOK EXPERIMENT!

First of all, find me on Facebook and make me your friend. (Also, be sure to “like” USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP on Facebook.)

Here’s how the discount works!

It’s simple: make a Facebook status update and get a discount!

For every status update that you make that references:
“USMC Fitness Boot Camp,”
“Sgt. Tony’s Boot Camp,”
“Tony’s Boot Camp,”
or something similar, (there are fake boot camps out there) you can take $2.50 off your next reenlistment fee for each update!

You can take up to $20 off for any given month!

Your status update has to be a specific reference to USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP or to me specifically by name.

BE SURE TO TAG ME!

You can do the same thing by “checking in” at USMC Fitness Boot Camp either by using Facebook “places,” Foursquare, or any of the other “check in” apps that show up on your Facebook News Feed.

So log on and start getting your discounts now!

—————————————————

Q. How can I get up in the morning on a consistent basis?A. Contrary to what many think, I am NOT a morning person. I have to be “dynamited” out of the bed! Here are some tips to help you get going in the morning:
1. Use two alarm clocks. I have a snooze alarm that starts going off several minutes before I intend to get up. Then I have a “Last Call” alarm clock that is located across the room. This alarm clock is set to go off when I MUST get up.
2. Once the last call alarm goes off, the bed becomes OFF LIMITS! Get moving!
3. Get out of bed, turn off the alarm clock, and start turning on lights all through the house. Turn the TV on!
4. Lay out your clothes the night before. Don’t go wandering around the house in the morning trying to find your left shoe and your favorite shorts. So, have things ready the night before.

—————————————–

What would you do if money was not an issue, fear was not a factor, and failure was not an option?

To your optimum health and fitness!

SEE YOU ON THE QUARTERDECK!

Tony

Sergeant Major Tony Ludlow

USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP, Commanding
Mailing address: 4888 Southern Ave., Memphis, TN 38117
Cell Phone: 901-644-0145

Posted by Tony Ludlow | in Uncategorized | No Comments »


Puttin’ on the Ritz — Sgt. Tony Ludlow, blog post, 6/18/2014

Jun. 18th 2014

I used to own a tuxedo.

Before you label me some sort of closet socialite who enjoys going to parties in fancy clothes, and standing around eating finger food, making small talk with strangers, and having my picture taken for RSVP, keep reading.

Friends of mine owned a formal wear shop a few years ago and were getting out of the business. To liquidate stock, they were selling the inventory at a discount and giving me even MORE of a discount, IF I’d come by for a fitting and all. For the record, I’d rather do a million other things than try on clothes. I’m still traumatized from when my mom took me to Sears to buy some “husky” jeans when I was a kid. They were made out of kevlar, I’m assuming. They were indestructible and they were never broken in. You always walked around like Dorothy’s Tin Man. Medieval chainmaille was more comfortable. But when I was about 10 or 11, my mom took me to Sears and let me try on the clothes without her in the fitting room and without requiring me to walk back out onto the sales floor in my sock feet, wearing those bullet-proof jeans, and have her look me over and tug and pull. Instead she yelled instructions and questions into the fitting room area from the checkout. “TONY, DO YOU HAVE ENOUGH ROOM IN THE CROTCH??”

Oh … gawd …

I hid in that little trying-on-room for about an hour until everyone who’d heard that question was either gone or dead. Which is what I wanted to be: gone, or dead.

So a few years ago, I go to my friend’s tux shop to help them out, knowing full well that I probably won’t have too many opportunities to wear the tux. I have to admit, though, I did have a lot of fun that day and I bought a lot of outrageous stuff, including a cape that would make Dracula proud! Top hat, bow ties, regular ties, squeaky tux shoes, cumber buns, vests, tails … I got the full line and paid pennies on the dollar for it all.

And never ever wore it.

None of it.

It all hung in my closet until moths enjoyed it more than I did. Alas, I donated it all to Goodwill. I’m sure that somewhere some guy, down on his luck, is standing by an exit ramp looking dapper and asking for money wearing my tux. God Bless You and have a nice day.

That tux is one of the few things I’ve bought and not used. If I buy something, especially something of value, I feel compelled to use it, to get my money’s worth from it. I suppose that if I’d paid more for the tux I’d have been creative and crashed some gala event in my fancy pants and tails. But I didn’t. I bought that stuff just to help out a friend, but it didn’t really have much value to me.

When I was a kid, I thought being a millionaire would be the greatest! Today I joke that I’d like to win the lottery! Sometimes I even buy a few tickets, just for fun. (And that’s the closest I ever get to gambling.) Studies have shown that winning the lottery usually does not end well for people. Maybe it’s too much, too soon, too overwhelming. Maybe it’s something else. Most blow it all within 3 years.

Thomas Paine was one of the most ardent supporters of the American Revolution. In his case, the pen was indeed mightier than the sword and his writings have been described as some of the most important in American history, rallying the country around the cause for independence at a critical time. Chief among his writings: “The American Crisis,” and “Common Sense,” both published in 1776. Most folks would recognize the opening lines of “The American Crisis”: “These are the times that try men’s souls …” Further into the pamphlet, in the opening paragraph, Paine explains the very essence of human nature’s value system: “what we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives everything its value.”

Is it any wonder that we see the rich leading unhappy lives? Is it any surprise when the wealthy and beautiful can’t seem to keep it together? We don’t even bat an eye when we hear of the rock star or the Hollywood elite going off the deep end and ruining their lives with alcohol, drugs, and other destructive indulgences. Is it because they have no sense of value for anything? With enough money to buy anything and anyone, nothing and no one are of value?

Recently, I asked a number of you to respond to a questionnaire about your life before USMC Fitness Boot Camp (or exercise in general) and then what led you to join. The responses were unanimous. Concerns about health were the number one reason cited. Not weight loss, nor vanity, nor “going to the beach soon,” nor “wedding in a few months,” nor any other possible reason. Almost all had had a recent health scare and that had gotten their attention. Health and wellness had become dear.

I’d like to say that I’d be one of those who’d do well with winning the lottery. I probably say that thinking that if the lottery gods hear me say that, they’ll grant my wish to win and I’ll strike it rich! But if I did win it … would I quit exercising and watching what I eat? Not a chance! The physical condition of my body isn’t affected by my bank account. My body doesn’t check my statement to determine if it’s going to be healthy. All of us, rich and poor, must shoulder the burden of physical health and wellness in the same way: exercise and eat a healthy diet.

Take good care of yourself! Value your health and fitness!

Health is dear. Just ask anyone in the hospital.

— 30 —

——————————————————————

“A nation that makes a great distinction between its scholars and its warriors, will have its laws made by cowards and its wars fought by fools.” ~ Thucydides

————————————————

BOGA FOR 0530 & 0645 TOMORROW

BOGGING FOR 5:45PM TOMORROW

Don’t you think it’s time to move up in weights? Don’t you think that heavier dumbbells are in order?

————————————————

TODAY’S NUTRITION TALK
by Sergeant Ashley Holloway, Registered Dietitian, LDN

(A Registered Dietitian has a BS in Food Science, followed by a one year internship through an accredited university, and then with the recommendation of the internship program’s supervisor, a national examination is required. After that, an RD must have continuing education units annually in order to remain active and registered. An RD is an expert, not a hobbyist or a “food enthusiast.”)

Clean Eating’s Dirty Little Secrets

“You can lose weight by eating clean!” “The top 5 ways to eat clean.” “Clean eating has changed my life.” “Find out how you can be healthier by eating clean!”

“Clean eating” or “eating clean” seems to be a hot topic these days. I see posts and ads like the ones above all over Facebook, on blogs, in tweets, and even on the news. So if everyone is “eating clean” should you be too? Let’s take a closer look at some of the dirty little secrets surrounding this new health craze.

What the heck is clean eating anyway? The answer actually depends on whom you ask! Just by scrolling through several different web pages on clean eating I was surprised! The vegetarian says you shouldn’t eat meat, the Paleo diet loving power lifter says “clean eating” is not eating grains, the soccer mom says it is avoiding artificial flavorings and additives, the food enthusiast says it is avoiding fruit since it has too much sugar, and the diet guru says it is avoiding gluten since it leads to inflammation. How interesting! Five different websites and five different definitions! Clean eating is whatever these people what to think it is. Therein lies the problem … eating clean has no clear definition! If there is no clear definition of what clean eating is, it can’t really be debated or researched.

“Eating clean” won’t necessarily help you lose weight. Some proponents of “clean eating” seem to think that be eating a certain balance of clean foods will help your metabolism. Or that if you avoid “bad” foods you will burn more fat. Hogwash! Unless you create a calorie deficit (you eat less calories than you burn) you will NOT lose weight!!

“Clean eating” can actually lead to poor nutritional decision-making. When we hear over and over that sugar is bad, that additives cause cancer, that meat rots your stomach or that gluten causes inflammation, these claims can scare us. More than likely the health professionals and food enthusiasts mean well and just want us to cut back on things that they think are not healthy, but messages like these do more harm than good. People who may already be very food conscious may use this information as a way to restrict or avoid even more foods.

Should you go Gluten Free?

If you are on Facebook, watch the news, or shop at the grocery store than you probably know all about the gluten free craze. You can buy gluten free bread, cookies, and even dog food! But the question is, should you jump on the gluten free bandwagon?

Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, rye, and to a lesser extent, oats. Gluten is what provides elasticity to dough and the structure to bread. People with Celiac’s disease and gluten intolerance need to stay away from gluten for medical reasons. If they consume gluten containing foods can have debilitating gastrointestinal issues such as diarrhea, vomiting, gas, and it can cause inflammation and extensive damage to their small intestine.

Many people have started cutting out gluten from their diet thinking that gluten free is synonymous with healthy eating. Often this is not the case. If you are consuming cakes, cookies, pies and other items only because they are gluten free, you could be taking in extra sugar and calories that you had not planned on. And many gluten free foods contain added sugars to make up for the missing gluten. But often these foods don’t have the needed added B vitamins and iron that gluten containing foods often have.

If you are trying to lose weight or increase your heart health, unless you have gluten intolerance, going gluten free is not the best way to go.

Lastly, people that tout their way of clean eating falsely assume that their diet is perfect for everyone. Research shows this just isn’t true. There is no one-way of eating that is right for everyone. Runners need more carbohydrates, weight lifters may require more protein, and others may benefit from a more fiber filled diet. And most of us prefer to eat based on our own personal, regional, and cultural preferences. So following these strict “clean eating “diets can be very limiting and can actually make you pretty unhappy.

———————————————————

MAKE A $&(#&@^#!*% FACE!!!!

INCREASE YOUR WEIGHTS!

YOU GET OUT WHAT YOU PUT IN!

What you get out of the workouts is determined by you.

How much do you work? How much effort you put into trying to do all of the repetitions with proper form and how much weight you’re using will determine what you get out of each workout.

YOU DETERMINE WHETHER YOUR WORKOUT IS HALF-ASS OR KICKASS!

It’s time for you to go up in weights … that’s what I’m thinking!

MAKING A FACE (THE GRIMACE) IS THE POOR MAN’S (OR WOMAN’S) FACELIFT!

—————————————————

EVERY WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY IS T-SHIRT DAY!

WEAR YOUR RANK INSIGNIA SHIRT, SUB 7 SHIRT, OR OTHER USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP SHIRT!

—————————————————

SUB SEVEN CLUB!

Members of the Sub-7 Club are Boot Campers who’ve run the mile in under 7 minutes under my observation and timing.

Congratulations to the following members of the Sub Seven Club:

Corporal Lee Chase,
Corporal Chris McLelland,
Staff Sergeant Patrick Moore,
Staff Sergeant Rob Johnston,
Staff Sergeant Andrew Stolnicki,
Gunnery Sergeant Bart Thomas,
Staff Sergeant Dory Sellers,
Gunnery Sergeant Henry Kenworthy,
Master Sergeant John Winford,
First Sergeant Matt Green,
And Sergeant Major Andrew Forsdick.

—————————————————————

ACTIVE DUTY ROSTER OF VETERAN BOOT CAMPERS!

Are you coming up on promotion? Let me know! If you’ve been in the program for 6 months straight, you should be on the roster!

Every Wednesday is our Official BOOT CAMP T-SHIRT DAY! You can wear your rank insignia shirt anytime you‘d like, of course, but always every Wednesday!

The ACTIVE DUTY ROSTER

Under 6 months is a Private

Private First Class is more than 6 months but less than 1 year.
– Greg Gaston 8/2013
– Steve Pike 9/2013
– Angela Moore 12/2013
– Jenn Bonner 12/2013
– Brett Bonner 1/2014

Over 1 year is a Lance Corporal
– Pam Torres – meritoriously promoted 12/2012
– Teresa Reed 2/2012*
– Emma Crystal 5/2012
– Megan Collins 6/2012
– Maria Wyatt 6/2012
– Beth Stengel 2/2012
– Chris Kelley 6/2102
– Susye Clark 7/2012
– Lora Gubanov 8/2012
– Orli Weisser-Pike 9/2012
– Morgan Johnson 10/2012
– ShaWanda Upshaw 10/2012
– Chuck Miller 11/2012
– Diane Gorney 12/2012
– Lexie Johnston 12/201?
– Ashley Summers 2/2014
– Ben Summers 2/2013
– Sam Lee 2/2013
– Louise Biedenharn 2/2013
– Jay Biedenharn 2/2013
– Ragan Washburn 2/2013
– Mary Holland Doan 4/2013
– Kay Barkoh 4/2013
– Melissa Campbell 4/2013
– Gina Tice 4/2013

Over 2 years is a Corporal
– Jeremy Harris 1/2009*
– Courtney Phillips 2/2011
– JD Dombroski 4/2011
– Becky Lawler 5/2010*
– Carrie Schule 5/2011
– Bevan Lee 5/2011
– Mary Bauer 6/2011
– Lee Chase 7/2011
– Tait Keller 8/2011
– Heath Alderson 9/2011
– Lindsey Stanfill 9/2011
– Tara Ingram 11/2011
– Rachel Phillips 2/2012
– Jean Maskas 2/2012
– Keith Renard 4/2012
– Alan Compton 4/2012
– Steve Havard 5/2012

Over 3 years is a Sergeant
– Emily Melonas 6/2010
– Keith Renard 6/2009*
– Ashley McClure 7/2010
– Falana Scott 7/2010
– Jenni Harris 8/2010
– Anne Marie Wyatt 8/2010
– Tim Romanow 8/2010
– Paul Bauer 11/2010
– Robin Scott 3/2011
– Chris McLelland 3/2011
– Randal Rhea 4/2011
– Cindy King 4/2011
– Sherri Thompson 4/2011
– Melissa Thompson 5/2011
– Michelle Moss 5/2011

Over 4 years is a Staff Sergeant
– Jonathan Phillips 10/2008*
– Robert Hunt 8/2009
– Cameron Mosley 11/2009
– Karen Massey 11/2009
– Cecelia DeLacy 2/2010
– Malinda Miller 3/2010
– Jay Mednikow 3/2010
– Ashley Holloway 4/2010
– Beth Mills 5/2010

Over 5 years is a Gunnery Sergeant
– Albo Carruthers 8/2008
– Anne Kenworthy 8/2008
– Patrick Moore 9/2008
– Jessie Flanders 1/2009
– Andrew Stolnicki 1/2009
– Paul Tronsor 3/2009

Over 6 years is a Master Sergeant
– Anne Mead 2/2005*
– Leslie Garey 6/2007
– Beth Rehrig 7/2007
– Matt Prince 6/2007
– Frank Jemison 10/2007
– Patty Dougherty 3/2008
– Oscar Adams 3/2008
– Alan Schaeffer 5/2008
– Mike Ryan 5/2006*
– Dory Sellers 6/2006*

Over 7 years is a First Sergeant
– Megan Warr 8/2006
– Rob Norcross 8/2006
– Kay Ryan 10/2006
– Michelle Crockett 3/2007
– George Rose 5/2007
– Henry Kenworthy 5/2007

Over 8 years is a Sergeant Major
– Louis Glazer 3/2005
– Mike Barta 6/2005*
– Anne Emmerth 6/2005*
– Gary Thompson 10/2005
– Scot Bearup 10/2005
– Kay Shelton 1/2006
– Leesa Jensen 5/2006

Over 9 years is a Warrant Officer 1
– Andrew Forsdick 9/2004
– Melissa Moore 2/2005
– Matt Green 5/2005

Over 10 years is a Chief Warrant Officer 2
– Buddy Flinn 7/2003
– Amy Singer 9/2003
– David Townsend 1/2004
– Hank Brown 3/2004

Over 11 years is a Chief Warrant Officer 3
– Pat McGhee 1/2003
– John Whittemore 1/2003
– Peter Pettit 5/2003

Battalion Executive Officer
Major Richard Bourland, 9/2003

* broken time

——————————————

ARE WE FACEBOOK FRIENDS?

We should be!

HAVE YOU “LIKED” THE USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP FACEBOOK PAGE?

You should totally do that!

———————————————

BOOT CAMP DISCOUNT

If you set up an automatic payment at your bank (Boot Camp mailing address is 4888 Southern, Memphis 38117) you can subtract $10 off your fee!

(This is not in conjunction with other discounts and is not an automatic bank draft that I set up with a voided check. This an automatic payment that you yourself set up yourself with your bank usually online and easy as pie!)
———————————————

USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP CLASSES

0530 Monday through Friday
(First and second Tuesday of the month are M-16 Workouts at CUMC. Third and fourth Tuesdays are Mt. Fuji Workouts at the U of M)
5:45 PM: Monday through Thursday, 5:30 on Friday.

————————————————

BOOT CAMP DISCOUNTS AND FACEBOOK EXPERIMENT!

First of all, find me on Facebook and make me your friend. (Also, be sure to “like” USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP on Facebook.)

Here’s how the discount works!

It’s simple: make a Facebook status update and get a discount!

For every status update that you make that references:
“USMC Fitness Boot Camp,”
“Sgt. Tony’s Boot Camp,”
“Tony’s Boot Camp,”
or something similar, (there are fake boot camps out there) you can take $2.50 off your next reenlistment fee for each update!

You can take up to $20 off for any given month!

Your status update has to be a specific reference to USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP or to me specifically by name.

BE SURE TO TAG ME!

You can do the same thing by “checking in” at USMC Fitness Boot Camp either by using Facebook “places,” Foursquare, or any of the other “check in” apps that show up on your Facebook News Feed.

So log on and start getting your discounts now!

—————————————————

Q. How can I get up in the morning on a consistent basis?A. Contrary to what many think, I am NOT a morning person. I have to be “dynamited” out of the bed! Here are some tips to help you get going in the morning:
1. Use two alarm clocks. I have a snooze alarm that starts going off several minutes before I intend to get up. Then I have a “Last Call” alarm clock that is located across the room. This alarm clock is set to go off when I MUST get up.
2. Once the last call alarm goes off, the bed becomes OFF LIMITS! Get moving!
3. Get out of bed, turn off the alarm clock, and start turning on lights all through the house. Turn the TV on!
4. Lay out your clothes the night before. Don’t go wandering around the house in the morning trying to find your left shoe and your favorite shorts. So, have things ready the night before.

—————————————–

What would you do if money was not an issue, fear was not a factor, and failure was not an option?

To your optimum health and fitness!

SEE YOU ON THE QUARTERDECK!

Tony

Sergeant Major Tony Ludlow

USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP, Commanding
Mailing address: 4888 Southern Ave., Memphis, TN 38117
Cell Phone: 901-644-0145

Posted by Tony Ludlow | in Uncategorized | No Comments »


You get $100, and YOU get $100, AND YOU GET $100! — Sgt. Tony Ludlow, blog post for 6/11/2014

Jun. 11th 2014

“Question everything. Including everything I tell you.”

I wrote this in a book I gave to my youngest son. In late spring of his junior year in high school, I bought a nice hardbound journal and started writing in it. My plan was to give it to him for his high school graduation. I set out to fill the pages of that journal with advice, observations, warnings, helpful tips, and the distillation of life’s lessons learned — in many cases, the hard way — from a father to a son, a son who would soon be taking his place among the company of men.

So I started writing.

I usually wrote on Sunday evenings, but if something came up during the week that seemed like a teachable event, I’d write about it then. I filled the journal’s pages, every one of them, and proudly gave it to my son over a year later on the occasion of his graduation from high school.

He was only mildly impressed. I was more than mildly disappointed. I had poured my life in to that journal and had spent hours and hours writing in it. I had often thought that if I had received such a book from my own father or grandfather, or even my older brother, I’d have cherished it like it had come from Mt. Sinai.

My youngest son is now 26 years old and I’m certain that he’s never read the book I wrote him. In fact, I’d be surprised if he even knows where it was. I’m certain that he’s never read it up to page 100 (there are almost 200 pages in it) because I set a trap for him on page 100. Well, it wasn’t really a trap. It was more like buried treasure.

See, on page 100 I told him how excited I was that I’d actually written 100 pages so far, and to celebrate that achievement, I would give him $100! As soon as he read that page, I told him on page 100, just email me or text me or call me and let me know that he’d made it to page 100 and he’d get a one hundred dollar bill! I put that $100 bill in an envelope when I finished the book and then put it in a file folder in my filing cabinet … where it has remained ever since.

Oh well.

If you know my son, do NOT tell him about this! I’m not worried about him finding out about the $100 that could be his when he reads this essay … as he has never read even one of my essays. (One of my friends tried to console me by telling me that my sons would read my work … after I’m dead. Well THAT didn’t really encourage me!)

Back to where I began this essay.

“Question everything,” I wrote, “even the things I tell you.”

If something is true or right or wise or worthy of all acceptation, then it will survive the test of analysis, inquiry, scrutiny, examination, and the requirement for evidence. As my favorite poet, Alfred Lord Tennyson wrote, “There lives more faith in honest doubt, believe me, than in half the creeds.” So question everything, I told him!

But we are seldom encouraged to question anything, much less everything. We either arrive at this condition through religious inculcation or instruction, social convention, or cultural adaptation. Don’t rock the boat. Keep your mouth shut. Don’t ask any questions. Just have faith. Keep that to yourself. Don’t question why. Give no voice to your doubts.

There’s a world of difference between opinion and proverbial wisdom. Financial freedom is always going to be found in spending less than you make; weight loss is always going to be found in burning more calories than you eat. These two things aren’t opinion, they’re life lessons learned through overcoming poverty or obesity. It’s science and economics. These things stand the test of time and examination. “Country music is awful” is just an opinion. And though millions and millions of people may think so, it is still only an opinion.

Social media is a hot bed of meaningless platitudes, harmful half-truths, bogus kindergarten theology, goofy new age philosophy, recycled conflicting ideologies, and just plain ignorance. It’s often found in memes with impressive fonts and majestic scenery in the background, giving it the appearance of … well, majesty! Sometimes they’re direct quotes, either misunderstood or taken out of context. And then other times they’re direct quotes from crackpots thrown out into the blogosphere and passed off as wisdom! I question whether the person quoting really understands and believes what they’ve posted and if they’re actually living their lives accordingly. Mostly, I think they just don’t know any better or they didn’t take the time to think it through or to question it. It just sounded nice or it just seemed to be right.

Our capacity to believe is vast. We love magic shows and movies and believe that what we see is real. Or better yet, we know that it’s not real, we simply choose to believe that it is. The willing suspension of disbelief. We want to believe that others aren’t out to take advantage of us, and if the packaging is nice and the message sincere, we are prone to believe and are susceptible to manipulation and error. If the speaker is clean-cut and wearing a nice suit, we trust that what they are saying is true and good. If the lady is pretty and has a pleasant voice and demeanor then she must surely be sincere and right. Bernie Madoff wore the finest clothes and spoke with great articulation, passion, and conviction as he pulled off the biggest con in history, stealing billions of dollars and ruining the lives of untold thousands. And there’s a popular meme seen on Facebook that has Snoop Dog and Martha Stewart together in a cooking segment on some tv talk show. The meme says something to the effect that “only one of these is a convicted felon … and it’s not who you think.”

And naturally this capacity to believe and this desire for the quick and easy, spills over into health and fitness. Snake oil salesmen are alive and well in Millennial America. We want to be able to take a pill or drink some potion or get an injection or wrap something around our bellies to speed up our metabolism, curb our appetites, and get that flat stomach. Our desire and willingness to believe, coupled with attractive people in lab coats and holding some sort of doctorate, makes us vulnerable. There’s an ad in a health magazine that has a picture of a charlatan selling “snake oil.” The guy is holding a stethoscope, but he’s not a doctor or a health care professional that sees patients. Nor does his profession use, or require the use of, a stethoscope. So why is he pictured holding one? That’s easy. (I’m certain that he’ll be wearing a lab coat in the next series of ads.)

We don’t want things to require hard work and discipline. We want success to be achieved with as little effort as possible. We want education, financial freedom, weight loss, health, and fitness to come painlessly and without inconvenience or trouble. But the hard truth of the matter is that those things are not obtained cheaply or without hard work or without a change in our behavior.

Everyday, someone somewhere is offering pseudo-science masquerading as real science. Someone will trade your money for their magic show. Someone will try to persuade you that the science community is withholding the remedy to your obesity, slow metabolism, sluggishness, lethargy, laziness, and poor health, but if you’ll just purchase their product(s) and methods, you can by-pass all of that hard work and sweat. Don’t believe it! In the mart of competitive commerce, someone is willing to sell you the dream without the discipline, the result without the work.

Question everything.

— 30 —

———————————————————

WEATHER PERMITTING, DANTE’S INFERNO TOMORROW!

If we’ve got inclement weather, it’s BOGA for all!

———————————————————

TODAY’S NUTRITION TALK
by Staff Sergeant Ashley Holloway, Registered Dietitian, LDN

(A Registered Dietitian has a BS in Food Science, followed by a one year internship through an accredited university, and then with the recommendation of the internship program’s supervisor, a national examination is required. After that, an RD must have continuing education units annually in order to remain active and registered. An RD is an expert, not a hobbyist or a “food enthusiast.”)

Shape Matters – Are you an apple or a pear?

We come in all shapes and sizes. Tall, petite, round, thin, muscular, and soft; we are as diverse as our fingerprints. One size does not fit all. But when it comes to health, shape matters. And knowing whether you’re shaped like an apple or a pear might help you lower your risk for medical conditions such as heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, and diabetes.

You can compare the two body shapes with an apple and a pear: If you hold them by the stalk, the pear is thickest at the bottom, while the apple is thickest in the middle. If fat tends to gather high around your abdomen, you’re an apple. If it collects more around your hips and thighs, you’re a pear.

The dangers associated with obesity vary. If you are overweight, the position of those extra pounds is important. And being pear-shaped is healthier than being apple-shaped. Research shows that if you have more fat concentrated around the waist as opposed to your hips, thighs and behind, you have a greater risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

Too much fat around your belly is not good for your health, but the type of fat you carry there also matters. The softer, squishy type of belly fat is preferable. This is the kind of fat you can see and can grab with your hand. This is called is subcutaneous fat. This fat sits right under your skin and on the outside of your muscle wall and seems to be less related to heart disease and diabetes.

The deeper kind of fat which is underneath the muscle wall is called visceral fat. This kind of fat is much less healthy since it surrounds your organs and raises your risk of disease. Since this type of fat is underneath the muscle wall, this type of belly looks distended, but when you press on it, it feels firm to the touch, not squishy and soft.

How do you know if you have too much abdominal fat? The easiest way, besides using your eyes, is to use a measuring tape. Women should have a waist measurement of less than 30 inches and men should have a waist of less than 40 inches around. Note this is NOT your pants size! Your waist is measured around your midline at the belly button with your body in a relaxed state (not sucking in!)

Remember no matter your body shape, apple or pear, if you weigh too much, it will generally improve your health and wellbeing if you lose some weight.

———————————————————

MAKE A $&(#&@^#!*% FACE!!!!

INCREASE YOUR WEIGHTS!

YOU GET OUT WHAT YOU PUT IN!

What you get out of the workouts is determined by you.

How much do you work? How much effort you put into trying to do all of the repetitions with proper form and how much weight you’re using will determine what you get out of each workout.

YOU DETERMINE WHETHER YOUR WORKOUT IS HALF-ASS OR KICKASS!

It’s time for you to go up in weights … that’s what I’m thinking!

MAKING A FACE (THE GRIMACE) IS THE POOR MAN’S (OR WOMAN’S) FACELIFT!

————————————————————

EVERY WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY ARE T-SHIRT DAYS!

WEAR YOUR RANK INSIGNIA SHIRT, SUB 7 SHIRT, OR OTHER USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP SHIRT!

—————————————————————

SUB SEVEN CLUB!

Members of the Sub-7 Club are Boot Campers who’ve run the mile in under 7 minutes under my observation and timing.

These are the current members of the Sub Seven Club:

Corporal Lee Chase,
Corporal Chris McLelland,
Staff Sergeant Patrick Moore,
Staff Sergeant Rob Johnston,
Staff Sergeant Andrew Stolnicki,
Gunnery Sergeant Bart Thomas,
Staff Sergeant Dory Sellers,
Gunnery Sergeant Henry Kenworthy,
Master Sergeant John Winford,
First Sergeant Matt Green,
And Sergeant Major Andrew Forsdick.

—————————————————————

ACTIVE DUTY ROSTER OF VETERAN BOOT CAMPERS!

Are you coming up on promotion? Let me know! If you’ve been in the program for 6 months straight, you should be on the roster!

Every Wednesday is our Official BOOT CAMP T-SHIRT DAY! You can wear your rank insignia shirt anytime you‘d like, of course, but always every Wednesday!

The ACTIVE DUTY ROSTER

Under 6 months is a Private

Private First Class is more than 6 months but less than 1 year.
– Greg Gaston 8/2013
– Steve Pike 9/2013
– Angela Moore 12/2013
– Jenn Bonner 12/2013
– Brett Bonner 1/2014

Over 1 year is a Lance Corporal
– Pam Torres – meritoriously promoted 12/2012
– Teresa Reed 2/2012*
– Emma Crystal 5/2012
– Megan Collins 6/2012
– Maria Wyatt 6/2012
– Beth Stengel 2/2012
– Chris Kelley 6/2102
– Susye Clark 7/2012
– Lora Gubanov 8/2012
– Orli Weisser-Pike 9/2012
– Morgan Johnson 10/2012
– ShaWanda Upshaw 10/2012
– Chuck Miller 11/2012
– Diane Gorney 12/2012
– Lexie Johnston 12/201?
– Ashley Summers 2/2014
– Ben Summers 2/2013
– Sam Lee 2/2013
– Louise Biedenharn 2/2013
– Jay Biedenharn 2/2013
– Ragan Washburn 2/2013
– Mary Holland Doan 4/2013
– Kay Barkoh 4/2013
– Melissa Campbell 4/2013
– Gina Tice 4/2013

Over 2 years is a Corporal
– Jeremy Harris 1/2009*
– Courtney Phillips 2/2011
– JD Dombroski 4/2011
– Becky Lawler 5/2010*
– Carrie Schule 5/2011
– Bevan Lee 5/2011
– Mary Bauer 6/2011
– Lee Chase 7/2011
– Tait Keller 8/2011
– Heath Alderson 9/2011
– Lindsey Stanfill 9/2011
– Tara Ingram 11/2011
– Rachel Phillips 2/2012
– Jean Maskas 2/2012
– Keith Renard 4/2012
– Alan Compton 4/2012
– Steve Havard 5/2012

Over 3 years is a Sergeant
– Emily Melonas 6/2010
– Keith Renard 6/2009*
– Ashley McClure 7/2010
– Falana Scott 7/2010
– Jenni Harris 8/2010
– Anne Marie Wyatt 8/2010
– Tim Romanow 8/2010
– Paul Bauer 11/2010

– Robin Scott 3/2011
– Chris McLelland 3/2011
– Randal Rhea 4/2011
– Cindy King 4/2011
– Sherri Thompson 4/2011
– Melissa Thompson 5/2011
– Michelle Moss 5/2011

Over 4 years is a Staff Sergeant
– Jonathan Phillips 10/2008*
– Robert Hunt 8/2009
– Cameron Mosley 11/2009
– Karen Massey 11/2009
– Cecelia DeLacy 2/2010
– Malinda Miller 3/2010

– Jay Mednikow 3/2010
– Ashley Holloway 4/2010
– Beth Mills 5/2010

Over 5 years is a Gunnery Sergeant
– Albo Carruthers 8/2008
– Anne Kenworthy 8/2008
– Patrick Moore 9/2008
– Jessie Flanders 1/2009
– Andrew Stolnicki 1/2009
– Paul Tronsor 3/2009

Over 6 years is a Master Sergeant
– Anne Mead 2/2005*
– Leslie Garey 6/2007
– Beth Rehrig 7/2007
– Matt Prince 6/2007

– Frank Jemison 10/2007
– Patty Dougherty 3/2008
– Oscar Adams 3/2008
– Alan Schaeffer 5/2008

– Mike Ryan 5/2006*
– Dory Sellers 6/2006*

Over 7 years is a First Sergeant
– Megan Warr 8/2006
– Rob Norcross 8/2006
– Kay Ryan 10/2006
– Michelle Crockett 3/2007
– George Rose 5/2007
– Henry Kenworthy 5/2007

Over 8 years is a Sergeant Major
– Louis Glazer 3/2005
– Mike Barta 6/2005*
– Anne Emmerth 6/2005*
– Gary Thompson 10/2005
– Scot Bearup 10/2005
– Kay Shelton 1/2006
– Leesa Jensen 5/2006

Over 9 years is a Warrant Officer 1
– Andrew Forsdick 9/2004
– Melissa Moore 2/2005
– Matt Green 5/2005

Over 10 years is a Chief Warrant Officer 2
– Buddy Flinn 7/2003
– Amy Singer 9/2003
– David Townsend 1/2004
– Hank Brown 3/2004

Over 11 years is a Chief Warrant Officer 3
– Pat McGhee 1/2003
– John Whittemore 1/2003
– Peter Pettit 5/2003

Battalion Executive Officer
Major Richard Bourland, 9/2003

* broken time

——————————————

ARE WE FACEBOOK FRIENDS?

We should be!

HAVE YOU “LIKED” THE USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP FACEBOOK PAGE?

You should totally do that!

———————————————

BOOT CAMP DISCOUNT

If you set up an automatic payment at your bank (Boot Camp mailing address is 4888 Southern, Memphis 38117) you can subtract $10 off your fee!

(This is not an automatic bank draft that I set up with a voided check. This an automatic payment that you yourself set up yourself with your bank.)

———————————————

USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP CLASSES

0530 Monday through Friday
(First and second Tuesday of the month are M-16 Workouts at CUMC. Third and fourth Tuesdays are Mt. Fuji Workouts at the U of M)

5:45 PM: Monday through Thursday, 5:30 on Friday.

————————————————

BOOT CAMP DISCOUNTS AND FACEBOOK EXPERIMENT!

First of all, find me on Facebook and make me your friend. (Also, be sure to “like” USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP on Facebook.)

Here’s how the discount works!

It’s simple: make a Facebook status update and get a discount!

For every status update that you make that references:
“USMC Fitness Boot Camp,”
“Sgt. Tony’s Boot Camp,”
“Tony’s Boot Camp,”
or something similar, (there are fake boot camps out there) you can take $2.50 off your next reenlistment fee for each update!

You can take up to $20 off for any given month!

Your status update has to be a specific reference to USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP or to me specifically by name.

BE SURE TO TAG ME!

You can do the same thing by “checking in” at USMC Fitness Boot Camp either by using Facebook “places,” Foursquare, or any of the other “check in” apps that show up on your Facebook News Feed.

So log on and start getting your discounts now!

—————————————————

Q. How can I get up in the morning on a consistent basis?
A. Contrary to what many think, I am NOT a morning person. I have to be “dynamited” out of the bed! Here are some tips to help you get going in the morning:
1. Use two alarm clocks. I have a snooze alarm that starts going off several minutes before I intend to get up. Then I have a “Last Call” alarm clock that is located across the room. This alarm clock is set to go off when I MUST get up.
2. Once the last call alarm goes off, the bed becomes OFF LIMITS! Get moving!
3. Get out of bed, turn off the alarm clock, and start turning on lights all through the house. Turn the TV on!

4. Lay out your clothes the night before. Don’t go wandering around the house in the morning trying to find your left shoe and your favorite shorts. So, have things ready the night before.

—————————————–

What would you do if money was not an issue, fear was not a factor, and failure was not an option?

To your optimum health and fitness!

SEE YOU ON THE QUARTERDECK!

Tony

Sergeant Major Tony Ludlow

USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP, Commanding
Mailing address: 4888 Southern Ave., Memphis, TN 38117
Cell Phone: 901-644-0145

Posted by Tony Ludlow | in Uncategorized | No Comments »


Starving Artists — Sgt. Tony Ludlow blog post, 6/4/2014

Jun. 4th 2014

Do you remember your best day at school?

I do.

It didn’t have anything to do with exams or social intrigue. No extra-curricular activities or special events. In fact, though I loved school, or rather, I loved being at school but not always loving the subjects, it wasn’t until my junior year in college that I had this best of the best days. It also wasn’t until college that I got serious about my studies. It’s funny how your own money financing your education does that.

The professor for this particular English class, Dr. Amy Blankenship, was, to put it kindly, a lady of a certain age who had not never married and had passed beyond the age of birthing babies. Her work was her life. She taught and she wrote and — as if she weren’t stereotypical enough — she took care of her 5 cats. She was wonderful and her enthusiasm for academics and teaching were almost equal to her love for cheesecake.

On this best of all days, she divided us into groups and gave each group an assignment. Ordinarily I’d rather take a hammer to my head than to break into small groups. I groan inside every time a teacher or speaker says “let’s break into small groups.” And this breaking into groups thing was starting out like every one of those other miserable experiences. (Thing is, they’re never nearly as miserable as I imagine. I have no idea why I have such an aversion to the whole thing.)

The assignment was simple: as a group, formulate 10 opening sentences for a book or short story. The sentence needed to get the readers attention and draw them into the story. We were to compose things like:

“We were somewhere around Barstow on the edge of the desert when the drugs began to take hold.” — “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas,” by Hunter S. Thompson.

“When he was nearly thirteen, my brother Jem got his arm badly broken at the elbow.” — “To Kill a Mockingbird,” by Harper Lee.

“The man in black fled across the desert and the gunslinger followed.” — “The Dark Tower,” by Stephen King.

“In my younger and more vulnerable years my father gave me some advice that I’ve been turning over in my mind ever since.” — “The Great Gatsby,” by F. Scott Fitzgerald.

“Tyler gets me a job as a waiter, after that Tyler’s pushing a gun in my mouth and saying, the first step to eternal life is you have to die.” — “Fight Club,” by Chuck Palahniuk. (This line also incorporates the beginning of “The Satanic Verses,” by Salman Rushdie! Kind of a genius move, I’d say!)

“It was a queer, sultry summer, the summer they electrocuted the Rosenbergs, and I didn’t know what I was doing in New York.” — “The Bell Jar,” by Sylvia Plath.

“I write this sitting in the kitchen sink.” — “I Capture the Castle,” by Dodie Smith.

“Call me Ishmael.” — “Moby Dick,” by Herman Melville.

“The cold passed reluctantly from the earth, and the retiring fogs revealed an army stretched out on the hills, resting.” — “The Red Badge of Courage,” by Stephen Crane.

All of us were quite certain that none of us in our little groups were going to come anywhere close to these lines, but we were determined to try. And I can’t tell you how much fun this was! I don’t remember any of our lines, I just remember how much fun it was to conjure them up out of thin air.

Afterwards, one member from each group read their group’s lines to the whole class. When that was over and the group time was over, Dr. Blankenship had us write 10 sentences of our own composition and hand them in. When we were finished, we could leave early. I stayed until the bell rang. I was finished with time to spare, but I just kept rewriting the lines, correcting or altering or modifying, and I just kept writing additional sentences.

I wasn’t alone. Several of my classmates did the same thing. And when the bell rang, we reluctantly got up and handed in our pages of work, happy in the experience, but sad that it was over.

For some students, this might be “the worst of times.” But for me, it was the “best of times!”

I think the essence of happiness in this world is to find things that give you that kind of joy. Things that ignite your passions! Things that make time fly. Things that you get lost in.

Not long ago a new friend asked what I did for a living and I said “I’m a reader and a writer.” She got very excited and said, “Oh, how exciting! Have you had a number of things published … could I buy your work on Amazon or Kindle?” “No,” I said, “the few things I’ve had published aren’t available anywhere … I don’t actually make any money writing … I run a fitness company for money … but I write for a ‘living.’” (Actually, I’m pretty passionate about fitness and athletics too!)

Sometimes people tell me that they’re unhappy in their current job or profession. I ask them what they’d like to do instead. A lot of times they don’t know, they just know what they don’t want to be doing. But sometimes they say that they’d love to be doing X, Y, or Z because they’ve got a love for that, a passion for it. I always encourage them to try doing those things part-time. Test the waters without giving up the gig that pays the bills.

If you’re serious, downsize your life to facilitate the dream. Buying a smaller house, driving an older car that you don’t owe anything on, giving up needless luxuries like country club memberships and Florida condo timeshares to simplifying your life so that you can worry less about money and invest more of your time and psychic energy into your passions. We must be careful that we don’t become enslaved by our possessions. There’s an interesting admonition in the New Testament book of Luke that goes like this: “Beware! Guard against every kind of greed. Life is not measured by how much you own.”

What are you passionate about? What makes the time fly? What gives you joy?

It may not be anything that will ever pay the bills, but find a way to carve out space and time in your life for those things. For those things are what redeems the time you have in this life.

— 30 —

———————————————————

PHYSICAL FITNESS TEST FOR ALL TOMORROW!

We’ll be conducting our regular PFT at all classes tomorrow, Thursday, June 5.

———————————————————

TODAY’S NUTRITION TALK
by Staff Sergeant Ashley Holloway, Registered Dietitian, LDN

(A Registered Dietitian has a BS in Food Science, followed by a one year internship through an accredited university, and then with the recommendation of the internship program’s supervisor, a national examination is required. After that, an RD must have continuing education units annually in order to remain active and registered. An RD is an expert, not a hobbyist or a “food enthusiast.”)

Do you need to Detox?

Detox diets are touted as a way to flush toxins out of your system. These diets are quite popular, but they are not scientifically proven.

The specifics of detox diets can vary, but usually a period of fasting is then followed by a strict diet of raw vegetables, fruit and fruit juices, and water. Some detox diets also advocate using herbs and other supplements along with colon cleansing through enemas or colonics to further empty the intestines.

You may lose a little bit of weight from a detox diet, but it is usually temporary from a combination of being on a very low calorie diet, losing water weight, and from having empty intestines. Plus, you’re likely to lose weight and then gain it right back when you go off any extreme diet.

There is little evidence that detox diets actually remove toxins from the body. Nor do you need to help your body “detoxify.” Your organs and immune system handle these duties, no matter what you eat. Your kidneys and liver are quite effective at filtering and eliminating most ingested toxins.

Some say that they feel better on a detox diet, but why they temporarily feel better may actually come from the fact that they are avoiding highly processed foods, extra sugar, and fat. These benefits may come at a cost. Detox diets that severely limit protein or that require fasting can result in fatigue, muscle aches, and irritability. Long-term fasting can result in vitamin and mineral deficiencies. Colon cleansing, through enemas and colonics, can cause cramping, bloating, nausea and vomiting and even dehydration can be a concern. And if the diet recommends pills, herbs, or supplements, these items are not backed by the FDA and can interact with different medications and can cause issues on their own.

Finally, keep in mind that fad diets aren’t a good long-term solution. For lasting results, your best bet is to eat a healthy diet based on fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and lean sources of protein.

———————————————————

MAKE A $&(#&@^#!*% FACE!!!!

INCREASE YOUR WEIGHTS!

YOU GET OUT WHAT YOU PUT IN!

What you get out of the workouts is determined by you.

How much do you work? How much effort you put into trying to do all of the repetitions with proper form and how much weight you’re using will determine what you get out of each workout.

YOU DETERMINE WHETHER YOUR WORKOUT IS HALF-ASS OR KICKASS!

It’s time for you to go up in weights … that’s what I’m thinking!

MAKING A FACE (THE GRIMACE) IS THE POOR MAN’S (OR WOMAN’S) FACELIFT!

————————————————————

EVERY WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY ARE T-SHIRT DAYS!

WEAR YOUR RANK INSIGNIA SHIRT, SUB 7 SHIRT, OR OTHER USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP SHIRT!

—————————————————————

SUB SEVEN CLUB!

Members of the Sub-7 Club are Boot Campers who’ve run the mile in under 7 minutes under my observation and timing.

These are the current members of the Sub Seven Club:

Corporal Lee Chase,
Corporal Chris McLelland,
Staff Sergeant Patrick Moore,
Staff Sergeant Rob Johnston,
Staff Sergeant Andrew Stolnicki,
Gunnery Sergeant Bart Thomas,
Staff Sergeant Dory Sellers,
Gunnery Sergeant Henry Kenworthy,
Master Sergeant John Winford,
First Sergeant Matt Green,
And Sergeant Major Andrew Forsdick.

—————————————————————

VETERAN BOOT CAMPERS!

Are you coming up on promotion? Let me know!

Every Wednesday is our Official BOOT CAMP T-SHIRT DAY! You can wear your rank insignia shirt anytime you‘d like, of course, but always every Wednesday!

The ACTIVE DUTY ROSTER

Under 6 months is a Private

Private First Class is more than 6 months but less than 1 year.
– Greg Gaston 8/2013
– Steve Pike 9/2013
– Angela Moore 12/2013
– Jenn Bonner 12/2013
– Brett Bonner 1/2014

Over 1 year is a Lance Corporal
– Pam Torres – meritoriously promoted 12/2012
– Teresa Reed 2/2012*
– Emma Crystal 5/2012
– Megan Collins 6/2012
– Maria Wyatt 6/2012
– Beth Stengel 2/2012
– Chris Kelley 6/2102
– Susye Clark 7/2012
– Lora Gubanov 8/2012
– Orli Weisser-Pike 9/2012
– Morgan Johnson 10/2012
– ShaWanda Upshaw 10/2012
– Chuck Miller 11/2012
– Diane Gorney 12/2012
– Lexie Johnston 12/201?
– Ashley Summers 2/2014
– Ben Summers 2/2013
– Sam Lee 2/2013
– Louise Biedenharn 2/2013
– Jay Biedenharn 2/2013
– Ragan Washburn 2/2013
– Mary Holland Doan 4/2013
– Kay Barkoh 4/2013
– Melissa Campbell 4/2013
– Gina Tice 4/2013

Over 2 years is a Corporal
– Jeremy Harris 1/2009*
– Courtney Phillips 2/2011
– JD Dombroski 4/2011
– Becky Lawler 5/2010*
– Carrie Schule 5/2011
– Bevan Lee 5/2011
– Mary Bauer 6/2011
– Lee Chase 7/2011
– Tait Keller 8/2011
– Heath Alderson 9/2011
– Lindsey Stanfill 9/2011
– Tara Ingram 11/2011
– Rachel Phillips 2/2012
– Jean Maskas 2/2012
– Keith Renard 4/2012
– Alan Compton 4/2012
– Steve Havard 5/2012

Over 3 years is a Sergeant
– Emily Melonas 6/2010
– Keith Renard 6/2009*
– Ashley McClure 7/2010
– Falana Scott 7/2010
– Jenni Harris 8/2010
– Anne Marie Wyatt 8/2010
– Tim Romanow 8/2010
– Paul Bauer 11/2010

– Robin Scott 3/2011
– Chris McLelland 3/2011
– Randal Rhea 4/2011
– Cindy King 4/2011
– Sherri Thompson 4/2011
– Melissa Thompson 5/2011
– Michelle Moss 5/2011

Over 4 years is a Staff Sergeant
– Jonathan Phillips 10/2008*
– Robert Hunt 8/2009
– Cameron Mosley 11/2009
– Karen Massey 11/2009
– Cecelia DeLacy 2/2010
– Malinda Miller 3/2010

– Jay Mednikow 3/2010
– Ashley Holloway 4/2010
– Beth Mills 5/2010

Over 5 years is a Gunnery Sergeant
– Mike Ryan 5/2006*
– Dory Sellers 6/2006*
– Albo Carruthers 8/2008
– Anne Kenworthy 8/2008
– Patrick Moore 9/2008
– Jessie Flanders 1/2009
– Andrew Stolnicki 1/2009
– Paul Tronsor 3/2009

Over 6 years is a Master Sergeant
– Anne Mead 2/2005*
– Leslie Garey 6/2007
– Beth Rehrig 7/2007
– Matt Prince 6/2007

– Frank Jemison 10/2007
– Patty Dougherty 3/2008
– Oscar Adams 3/2008
– Alan Schaeffer 4/2008

Over 7 years is a First Sergeant
– Megan Warr 8/2006
– Rob Norcross 8/2006
– Kay Ryan 10/2006
– Michelle Crockett 3/2007
– George Rose 5/2007
– Henry Kenworthy 5/2007

Over 8 years is a Sergeant Major
– Louis Glazer 3/2005
– Mike Barta 6/2005*
– Anne Emmerth 6/2005*
– Gary Thompson 10/2005
– Scot Bearup 10/2005
– Kay Shelton 1/2006
– Leesa Jensen 5/2006

Over 9 years is a Warrant Officer 1
– Andrew Forsdick 9/2004
– Melissa Moore 2/2005
– Matt Green 5/2005

Over 10 years is a Chief Warrant Officer 2
– Buddy Flinn 7/2003
– Amy Singer 9/2003
– David Townsend 1/2004
– Hank Brown 3/2004

Over 11 years is a Chief Warrant Officer 3
– Pat McGhee 1/2003
– John Whittemore 1/2003
– Peter Pettit 5/2003

Battalion Executive Officer
Major Richard Bourland, 9/2003

* broken time

——————————————

ARE WE FACEBOOK FRIENDS?

We should be!

HAVE YOU “LIKED” THE USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP FACEBOOK PAGE?

You should totally do that!

———————————————

BOOT CAMP DISCOUNT

If you set up an automatic payment at your bank (Boot Camp mailing address is 4888 Southern, Memphis 38117) you can subtract $10 off your fee!

(This is not an automatic bank draft that I set up with a voided check. This an automatic payment that you yourself set up yourself with your bank.)

———————————————

USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP CLASSES

0530 Monday through Friday
(First and second Tuesday of the month are M-16 Workouts at CUMC. Third and fourth Tuesdays are Mt. Fuji Workouts at the U of M)

5:45 PM: Monday through Thursday, 5:30 on Friday.

————————————————

BOOT CAMP DISCOUNTS AND FACEBOOK EXPERIMENT!

First of all, find me on Facebook and make me your friend. (Also, be sure to “like” USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP on Facebook.)

Here’s how the discount works!

It’s simple: make a Facebook status update and get a discount!

For every status update that you make that references:
“USMC Fitness Boot Camp,”
“Sgt. Tony’s Boot Camp,”
“Tony’s Boot Camp,”
or something similar, (there are fake boot camps out there) you can take $2.50 off your next reenlistment fee for each update!

You can take up to $20 off for any given month!

Your status update has to be a specific reference to USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP or to me specifically by name.

BE SURE TO TAG ME!

You can do the same thing by “checking in” at USMC Fitness Boot Camp either by using Facebook “places,” Foursquare, or any of the other “check in” apps that show up on your Facebook News Feed.

So log on and start getting your discounts now!

—————————————————

Q. How can I get up in the morning on a consistent basis?
A. Contrary to what many think, I am NOT a morning person. I have to be “dynamited” out of the bed! Here are some tips to help you get going in the morning:
1. Use two alarm clocks. I have a snooze alarm that starts going off several minutes before I intend to get up. Then I have a “Last Call” alarm clock that is located across the room. This alarm clock is set to go off when I MUST get up.
2. Once the last call alarm goes off, the bed becomes OFF LIMITS! Get moving!
3. Get out of bed, turn off the alarm clock, and start turning on lights all through the house. Turn the TV on!

4. Lay out your clothes the night before. Don’t go wandering around the house in the morning trying to find your left shoe and your favorite shorts. So, have things ready the night before.

—————————————–

What would you do if money was not an issue, fear was not a factor, and failure was not an option?

To your optimum health and fitness!

SEE YOU ON THE QUARTERDECK!

Tony

Sergeant Major Tony Ludlow

USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP, Commanding
Mailing address: 4888 Southern Ave., Memphis, TN 38117
Cell Phone: 901-644-0145

Posted by Tony Ludlow | in Uncategorized | No Comments »


Thursday, 5 June 2014

Jun. 4th 2014

Weather permitting, we’ll have our Physical Fitness Test for all classes tomorrow, Thursday, June 5, 2014!

You do NOT want to miss this opportunity to put yourself to the test and see how you’ve improved! Don’t be skeerit!

Posted by Tony Ludlow | in Uncategorized | No Comments »


My Friend, Paul Oliver

Jun. 3rd 2014

Stars & Stripes has picked up this story about my friend, Paul.

The original story was in this past Sunday’s edition of the Memphis Commercial Appeal newspaper. Paul’s 31st birthday would have been, of all days, last Monday … Memorial Day.

One day during the dark and difficult days toward the end, I managed to talk Paul into leaving his house and go to the grocery store. He needed some things, but mostly he needed to get Scout, his dog, some food. Paul hadn’t been out of the house for several days. When he got home I asked him for a “SitRep,” Marine-speak for a “situation report.” He told me, “Coach, while I stood in line to check out, the lady behind me said ‘hello, how are you?’ and after noticing the dog food asked ‘what kind of dog do you have?’ … and the lady who checked me out at the register was so nice … these things really made me feel good … they were so kind to me … ”

The kindnesses of strangers kept my friend alive for one more day … gave him hope … caused him to see the goodness in others … for one more day. Two strangers who will never know that their casual encounter meant so much to a fine young man, a hero, trying to find his way …

http://www.stripes.com/news/marine-corps/marine-s-final-battle-years-of-fighting-ptsd-brain-injury-end-in-postwar-casualty-1.286343

Posted by Tony Ludlow | in Uncategorized | No Comments »


Like us on Facebook

Sign up for our Email Newsletter
For Email Marketing you can trust

Search

Categories

Archives