Sergeant Tony's Blog

Archive for January, 2014

Attention, Buffalo Runners!

Jan. 31st 2014

Good Afternoon Buffalo Runners!

A couple of things:

1) Weather experts have advised us to run on SATURDAY instead of Sunday. So we’ll be running TOMORROW morning. Meet at the same time and place: 7am in front of the Visitor’s Center at Shelby Farms. Be advised, Saturday is World Cancer Day and there will be activity at Shelby Farms. Parking will probably be jacked up, so you should plan on arriving a little early. We’ll be running 1hr 20min!

2) We have about 20 Buffalo Runners in New Orleans to run both the full marathon and the half marathon!!!! How cool is THAT?! GOOD LUCK, THUNDERING HERD!!!

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We’re OUTSIDE this morning at 0530! Friday, 1/31/2014

Jan. 31st 2014

We’re OUTSIDE this morning at 0530! Friday, 1/31/2014
We’re still INSIDE, 0645 Crew!

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Thomas Jefferson Wore Brooks — Sgt. Tony Ludlow, blog post for 1/30/2014

Jan. 30th 2014

My grandfather said, “believe half of what you see, a third of what you hear.”

Every time my family took him to the airport for his return flight home after one of his visits, he would give me a 5 dollar bill. When I was eight years old, five dollars was a LOT of money. He said that I could spend the money anyway I wanted, but with one stipulation. I couldn’t buy anything in the airport gift shop. He believed that everything in that shop was overpriced and substandard. Then again, he might have been keeping me from impulse buying.

I called him “Big Dad” because that’s what all of his other grandchildren, including my older siblings, called him. Big Dad also loved to quote James 1:9 to me, loudly in the presence of my father, his son-in-law, “be quick to listen, slow to speak, and slow to anger.” My father’s personal approach was more like “lose your temper immediately, ask questions occasionally, fix the damage rarely.”

I think my Big Dad was trying to mentor my father as much as he was trying to mentor me.

Big Dad also believed in the adage, “if it looks too good to be true, it is.”

In recent days I’ve learned a new phrase: “Ponzi Scheme.” When I first heard it I thought it had something to do with “Happy Days.” But that was Potsi, I think.

Charles Ponzi was an Italian emigrant who was convicted of fraud in 1920. He wasn’t the first to use the method of swindling people that bears his name today. He was just the most successful crook up to that point. However, his fraud doesn’t even come close to what Bernie Madoff is accused of doing. Ponzi would bow before Madoff.

A Ponzi scheme is one where people invest in an instrument that reads like something from a doctoral dissertation in finance or international banking that no one really understands. But the hook is that there is tremendous faith in the swindler and the investment promises to pay off huge dividends. In fact, initial investors do make money. But it’s primarily an elaborate pyramid scheme.

Guarantees on investments in anything are zero. Zero. But everyday we invest in hundreds of things, big and small, real and mystical, practical and metaphysical, emotional and financial that have barely a 50/50 probability of success. I have rolled the dice, metaphorically speaking, on hundreds and hundreds of things that didn’t work. I’ve lost time, money, and peace of mind in the process. And I’ll bet you have too.

But the only thing that I’ve ever invested in that gave me back more than I invested, that resulted in 100% success, that paid me back everything I invested and gave me returns that would make Bernie Madoff envious, is exercise. Exercise.

You might have predicted that, coming from me.

But this isn’t a sales pitch. Seriously. Hundreds of people get this newsletter who will never join the program. Either they live too far away, their schedules won’t allow it, they’re physically unable due to injury, they’re too afraid, or the program just isn’t their cup of tea, so they think. So this isn’t an appeal to persuade the unwilling. This is a statement of fact for every human being.

Exercise works. Period.

Exercise makes you healthy. Exercise makes you stronger. Exercise relieves you of stress. Exercise prolongs your life. Exercise enhances your quality of life. Exercise gives you a sense of personal pride and power, and … the list of benefits goes on.

And what’s the catch?

There is none. No catch.

You can exercise at home. You can open your front door and go for a run. You can go to the recreation centers, the gyms, the health clubs, the fitness centers at your church or community center. And of course, you can join USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP and work out with me and my crew, which I would much prefer that you do! But if you’re not going to be a BOOT CAMPER, then commit yourself to doing something that delivers on its promises: regular, intense, and effective EXERCISE!

For a small investment of time, discipline, and money, you get a huge payoff. You get what every person confined to a hospital bed would trade their life savings for: health and fitness.

Thomas Jefferson said, “Leave all the afternoon for exercise and recreation, which are as necessary as reading. I will rather say more necessary because health is worth more than learning.”

Tony Ludlow, USMC Fitness Boot Camp Memphis

— 30 —

23rd HALF MARATHON TRAINING CONTINUES THIS WEEKEND!

Our 23rd Half Marathon Training Session continues this weekend. The weather forecast for the weekend may require us to run on Saturday instead of Sunday. I’ll post my decision here and on Facebook by Friday afternoon.

The prerequisite for doing the training is simple: If you can cover 3 miles in 36 minutes or less, you’re good to go!

I’ve trained hundreds and hundreds of people to run a half marathon and I can train you too! In fact, using this same method of training, many have run their fastest 13.1 mile half! That said, our weekend runs are NOT about speed! Speed work is done, if done at all, during the week. More about that later!

Cost for the three month training:
$75 for Active Duty Boot Campers
$125 for all others.

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INCLEMENT WEATHER POLICY

We’ll follow the decision of the Shelby County School System. If the public schools in Memphis close, we’ll stand down. However, if the decision to close school is based strictly on the temperature, as was the case recently, we will be ON!

If the “FEELS LIKE” temperature is 32 or below, we’ll move the Quarterdeck inside. The 0645 class is inside from now until March Madness.

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CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR STAFF DIETITIAN!

Ashley is now a Razorback! She was accepted into the Graduate School at the University of Arkansas to pursue further master’s degree level studies in nutrition and aging! Undergrad work at San Diego State University, graduate degree work at UT Martin, and now graduate degree studies at Arkansas! We’re pretty lucky to have her! (So am I!)

And now, her nutrition column!

TODAY’S NUTRITION TALK
by Sergeant Ashley Hofeditz, Registered Dietitian, LDN

(A Registered Dietitian has a BS in Food Science, followed by a one year internship through an accredited university, and then with the recommendation of the internship program’s supervisor, a national examination is required. After that, an RD must have continuing education units annually in order to remain active and registered. An RD is an expert, not a hobbyist or a “food enthusiast.”)

Supplement Sense

Dietary supplements have been around for a long time and their popularity continues to rise. Sales in the United States rose 7 percent to $11.5 billion in 2012. Often, supplements claim to help you recover faster from a hard workout, or provide fuel and fluid needed during long endurance events. Many supplements also claim to help you lose weight quickly. Although many Americans use dietary supplements, a 2009 report from the U.S. Government Accountability Office stated that “according to experts, consumers are not well-informed about the safety and efficacy of dietary supplements and have difficulty interpreting labels on these products.” While supplements can help some people meet their nutrition needs, eating a wide variety of nutrient-rich foods is the best way for most people to obtain the nutrients they need to be healthy and reduce their risk of chronic disease, according to a newly updated position paper titled “Nutrient Supplementation” from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The Academy offers the following tips on what you should know before choosing supplements.

Things you should know:

* Dietary supplements are not well standardized—what the package says and what the product actually contains can be very different.
* Dietary supplements are not well regulated by the Food and Drug Administration.
* Supplements can go to market without any proof that they work or are safe.
* “Natural” does not equal safe. They still can contain banned substances.
* It is important to learn to be a critical consumer of advertisements for supplements and to read supplement labels. Ask your friendly Registered Dietitian to help you determine whether a supplement will help your performance.

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PFT

Our PFT is postponed for this month. We’ll test on Thursday, February 27th, weather permitting.

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FACEBOOK RESULTS!!!!!!!

WE HAVE OVER 4000 LIKES ON FACEBOOK!

Invite your friends to “like” our USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP Facebook page. You can do that directly from our Facebook page. Just go to the page and you’ll see a section on the right that will allow you to easily invite your friends to like the page. In particular, your Memphis friends!

This may be the first seed to sow in helping a friend get back into exercise and fitness! They can get exposed to what goes on, they’ll be more likely to make a change and maybe even join you on The Quarterdeck!

Encourage your friends and family to “Like” the page! It might motivate your friends and family to take charge of their lives!

Keep on checking in! Keep on tagging your friends! Over 50% of new members over the past 6 months have listed Facebook as the source where they first heard about us!

Thanks, everyone!

Tony Ludlow, USMC Fitness Boot Camp Memphis
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MAKE A $&(#&@^#!*% FACE!!!!

INCREASE YOUR WEIGHTS!

YOU GET OUT WHAT YOU PUT IN!

What you get out of the workouts is determined by you.

How much do you work? How much effort you put into trying to do all of the repetitions with proper form and how much weight you’re using will determine what you get out of each workout.

YOU DETERMINE WHETHER YOUR WORKOUT IS HALF-ASS OR KICKASS!

It’s time for you to go up in weights … that’s what I’m thinking!

MAKING A FACE (THE GRIMACE) IS THE POOR MAN’S (OR WOMAN’S) FACELIFT!

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EVERY WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY IS T-SHIRT DAY!

WEAR YOUR RANK INSIGNIA SHIRT, SUB 7 SHIRT, OR OTHER USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP SHIRT!

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SUB SEVEN CLUB!

Members of the Sub-7 Club are Boot Campers who’ve run the mile in under 7 minutes under my observation and timing.

Congratulations to the following members of the Sub Seven Club:

Corporal Lee Chase,
Corporal Chris McLelland,
Staff Sergeant Patrick Moore,
Staff Sergeant Rob Johnston,
Staff Sergeant Andrew Stolnicki,
Gunnery Sergeant Bart Thomas,
Staff Sergeant Dory Sellers,
Gunnery Sergeant Henry Kenworthy,
Master Sergeant John Winford,
First Sergeant Matt Green,
And Sergeant Major Andrew Forsdick.

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VETERAN BOOT CAMPERS!

Your rank insignia t-shirts look AWESOME on you! (Don’t forget to wear yours EVERY WEDNESDAY AND/OR THURSDAY, T-SHIRT DAY!

Every Wednesday is our Official BOOT CAMP T-SHIRT DAY! You can wear your rank insignia shirt anytime you‘d like, of course, but always every Wednesday!

The Rank Structure of the Quarterdeck:

Under 6 months is a Private
Six months to 1 year is a Private First Class.

Over 1 year is a Lance Corporal
– Pam Torres – meritoriously promoted 12/2012
– Rachel Phillips 2/2012
– Teresa Reed 2/2012
– Alan Compton 4/2012
– Natalie Mannon 5/2012
– Steve Havard 5/2012
– Emma Crystal 5/2012
– Megan Collins 6/2012
– Maria Wyatt 6/2012
– Beth Stengel 2/2012
– Chris Kelley 6/2102
– Susye Clark 7/2012
– Victoria Tigrett 8/2012
– Crystal Bloodworth 8/2012
– Lora Gubanov 8/2012
– Shelia Johnson 8/2012
– Orli Weisser-Pike 9/2012
– Morgan Johnson 10/2012
– ShaWanda Upshaw 10/2012
– Chuck Miller 11/2012
– Diane Gorney 12/2012
– Lexie Johnston 12/2012

Over 2 years is a Corporal
– Paul Bauer 11/2010
– Jeremy Harris 1/2009*
– Courtney Phillips 2/2011
– Robin Scott 3/2011
– Chris McLelland 3/2011
– JD Dombroski 4/2011
– Randal Rhea 4/2011
– Cindy King 4/2011
– Sherri Thompson 4/2011
– Becky Lawler 5/2010*
– Carrie Schule 5/2011
– Bevan Lee 5/2011
– Melissa Thompson 5/2011
– Michelle Moss 5/2011
– Mary Bauer 6/2011
– Lee Chase 7/2011
– Tait Keller 8/2011
– Heath Anderson 9/2011
– Lindsey Stanfill 9/2011
– Tara Ingram 11/2011

Over 3 years is a Sergeant
– Cecelia DeLacy 2/2010
– Malinda Miller 3/2010
– Ashley Hofeditz 4/2010
– Beth Mills 5/2010
– Emily Melonas 6/2010
– Keith Renard 6/2009*
– Ashley McClure 7/2010
– Falana Scott 7/2010
– Jenni Harris 8/2010
– Anne Marie Wyatt 8/2010
– Tim Romanow 8/2010

Over 4 years is a Staff Sergeant
– Jonathan Phillips 10/2008*
– Scott Plunkett 10/2008
– Shena Clemons 10/2008
– Jessie Flanders 1/2009
– Andrew Stolnicki 1/2009
– Ben Killerlain 1/2009
– Paul Tronsor 3/2009
– Teresa Faulk 6/2009
– Sarah Vickers 8/2009
– Robert Hunt 8/2009
– Cameron Mosley 11/2009
– Karen Massey 11/2009

Over 5 years is a Gunnery Sergeant
– George Rose 10/2007
– Frank Jemison 10/2007
– Patty Dougherty 3/2008
– Oscar Adams 3/2008
– Patty Dougherty 3/2008
– Rob Johnston 4/2008
– Alan Schaeffer 4/2008
– Buddy Daves 5/2008
– Mike Ryan 5/2006*
– Dory Sellers 6/2006*
– Albo Carruthers 8/2008
– Anne Kenworthy 8/2008
– Patrick Moore 9/2008

Over 6 years is a Master Sergeant
– Jeff Lee 1/2006
– Anne Mead 2/2005*
– Michelle Dunn 3/2007
– Henry Kenworthy 5/2007
– Leslie Garey 6/2007
– Beth Rehrig 7/2007
– Matt Prince 8/2007

Over 7 years is a First Sergeant
– Kay Shelton 1/2006
– Leesa Jensen 5/2006
– Megan Warr 8/2006
– Rob Norcross 8/2006
– Kay Ryan 10/2006

Over 8 years is a Sergeant Major
– Melissa Moore 2/2005
– Louis Glazer 3/2005
– Matt Green 5/2005
– Mike Barta 6/2005*
– Anne Emmerth 6/2005*
– Gary Thompson 10/2005
– Scot Bearup 10/2005

Over 9 years is a Warrant Officer 1
– David Townsend 1/2004
– Hank Brown 3/2004
– Andrew Forsdick 9/2004

Over 10 years is a Chief Warrant Officer 2
– Peter Pettit 5/2003
– Buddy Flinn 7/2003
– Amy Singer 9/2003

Over 11 years is a Chief Warrant Officer 3
– Pat McGhee 1/2003
– John Whittemore 1/2003

Battalion Executive Officer
Major Richard Bourland, 9/2003

* broken time

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ARE WE FACEBOOK FRIENDS?

We should be!

HAVE YOU “LIKED” THE USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP FACEBOOK PAGE?

You should totally do that!

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BOOT CAMP DISCOUNT

If you set up an automatic payment at your bank (Boot Camp mailing address is 4888 Southern, Memphis 38117) you can subtract $10 off your fee! That’s right, instead of $75, you can pay $65!

(This is not an automatic bank draft that I set up with a voided check. This an automatic payment that you yourself set up.)

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USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP CLASSES – NEW STUFF!

0530 Monday through Friday
(First and second Tuesday of the month are M-16 Workouts at CUMC. Third and fourth Tuesdays are Mt. Fuji Workouts at the U of M)

0645 M-F

5:45 PM: Monday through Thursday, 5:30 on Friday.

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BOOT CAMP DISCOUNTS AND FACEBOOK EXPERIMENT!

First of all, find me on Facebook and make me your friend. (Also, be sure to “like” USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP on Facebook.)

Here’s how the discount works!

It’s simple: make a Facebook status update and get a discount!

For every status update that you make that references:
“USMC Fitness Boot Camp,”
“Sgt. Tony’s Boot Camp,”
“Tony’s Boot Camp,”
or something similar, (there are fake boot camps out there) you can take $2.50 off your next reenlistment fee for each update!

You can take up to $20 off for any given month!

Your status update has to be a specific reference to USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP or to me specifically by name.

BE SURE TO TAG ME!

You can do the same thing by “checking in” at USMC Fitness Boot Camp either by using Facebook “places,” Foursquare, or any of the other “check in” apps that show up on your Facebook News Feed.

So log on and start getting your discounts now!

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Q. How can I get up in the morning on a consistent basis?
A. Contrary to what many think, I am NOT a morning person. I have to be “dynamited” out of the bed! Here are some tips to help you get going in the morning:
1. Use two alarm clocks. I have a snooze alarm that starts going off several minutes before I intend to get up. Then I have a “Last Call” alarm clock that is located across the room. This alarm clock is set to go off when I MUST get up.
2. Once the last call alarm goes off, the bed become OFF LIMITS! Get moving!
3. Get out of bed, turn off the alarm clock, and start turning on lights all through the house. Turn on the TV.
4. Lay out your clothes the night before. Don’t go wandering around the house in the morning trying to find your left shoe and your favorite shorts. So, have things ready the night before.

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What would you do if money was not an issue, fear was not a factor, and failure was not an option?

To your optimum health and fitness!

SEE YOU ON THE QUARTERDECK!

Tony

Sergeant Major Tony Ludlow

USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP, Commanding
Mailing address: 4888 Southern Ave., Memphis, TN 38117
Cell Phone: 901-644-0145

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BOGA FOR ALL TOMORROW!

Jan. 29th 2014

The PFT is postponed until next month, providing that the Groundhog gives us some good news this coming Sunday!

BOGA for all tomorrow, Thursday, 30 January!

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The Quarterdeck is …

Jan. 29th 2014

You can’t out run, out boot camp, out ride, out swim, out anything … a bad diet. If you eat more calories than you burn, you gain weight. Period. “You can do side-bends and sit-ups … ” all day long, but if you eat more than you burn …

Attention Evening Crew: The Quarterdeck in INSIDE tonight, Wed., 29 Jan. 2014.

Tony Ludlow, USMC Fitness Boot Camp Memphis

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NO MT. FUJI TOMORROW, TUES. 28 JAN. 2014

Jan. 27th 2014

Attention 0530 Crew!
The “misery factor” will be higher than the “awesomeness factor” tomorrow morning, so we’ll fall back to CUMC for M-16 in The Big Gym!

NO MT. FUJI TOMORROW.

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Inside tomorrow morning, 27 Jan 2014!

Jan. 26th 2014
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Protected: 24th Buffalo Runner’s Half Marathon Training Guide – Spring 2014

Jan. 26th 2014

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“Sturdy” Marathoners, or Why Aren’t All Marathon Runners Skinny? by Tony Ludlow, USMC Fitness Boot Camp Memphis

Jan. 25th 2014

When I lined up to run my first marathon, 15 marathons ago (32 half marathons ago), I went to my assigned coral to await the starting cannon. Corals are sectioned off areas of the starting line based on either the runner’s projected pace per mile or their anticipated finish time. I was aiming for a 4hr 30min finish time and got in the proper coral area.

With a little time on my hands before the start, I ran in place a little and did some stretching. Mostly it was just pre-race jitters and nervousness. While doing all of that, I started surveying my fellow coral-mates to see what we looked like. I was 5’10” 172 pounds and was in pretty decent shape. I lifted weights three to four times a week, ran three to four times a week, and rode my bike about 20 miles a week. As I looked around the coral, a lot of my fellow marathoners looked kind of like me, both male and female. People who looked like they worked out and whose body weight to height ratio looked like what I’d expect.

In front of me were some ladies and some fellas who did NOT look like they belonged in the same coral with the rest of us. They were, how can I say this nicely, a little chubby. A little chunky. One of my older gentlemen friends calls those ladies “sturdy.” There were sturdy girls and sturdy boys lined up in front of me in my coral.

A part of me wanted to go ask them nicely if they were in the correct coral. But I refrained. Good thing too. Because I chased three of those sturdy girls for the next 26.2 miles! (I got chicked by those chicks in the coral and I STAYED chicked for 26.2 miles!) In fact, when I hit the wall at about mile 18, it was the fact that those three sturdy girls — friends who’d come to the race together — were getting out of my line of sight and would be finished long before ME! So I kept running … just to keep those girls in sight. We finished within a minute of one another. Them finishing before me!

During the race, I just couldn’t figure out how girls who weren’t skinny, who were probably 20+ pounds heavier than they were in high school, were not only running and finishing a 26.2 mile marathon, but were doing so FASTER THAN ME!!! What didn’t make sense to me was why they weren’t more athletic looking. Why didn’t they look like runners?

As I thought more about this, I realized that I myself hadn’t lost any significant weight during my 6 months of marathon training. My weight at the beginning of training was about 175. On race day I was only 3 pounds lighter.

In the many many years since then I’ve gone from recreational runner to running coach. I’ve trained hundreds of people to run half marathons and full marathons. I know why sturdy ladies and chunky fellas can run distance races well and still not lose much, if any, weight in the process.

Here’s why.

Let’s take a 12 mile run, for example. In order to run for two hours straight — about the time it would take to run 12 miles — the runner will have carbo loaded, or at least ate a decent amount of food for fuel in the 48 hours prior to the run. During the run, most people will burn about 100 calories per mile. After 45 minutes to an hour of running, everyone will need to refuel in order not to “bonk,” that is, take in more calories so that you don’t run out of energy.

If you burned 600 calories during the first hour, almost every recreational runner will have to take in calories in the form of sports drinks and food to finish the two hour, 12 mile training run. The runner can easily finish that kind of run even, or with only a small amount of calories in the deficit column.

Post run, most of us reward ourselves with a hearty meal. I myself have been known to go to the donut shop and have 600 calories in donuts and coffee or chocolate milk … or a big stack of yummy pancakes! mmmmmm.

Here’s my point, for losing weight, four weekly runs of five miles each (20 miles total) would be more effective than a 20 mile weekend run. Most runners can run 5 miles without a sports drink or any food. I never have either on a “short” run like that. Consequently, I’m not taking in extra calories during the run, so everything I burn on the run goes into the deficit column. Now, post 5 mile run, if I don’t reward myself with a high calorie meal or “snack” (read “donuts”), I’ll have more success losing weight. And I seldom “reward” myself for a 5 mile run.

Distance running shouldn’t be seen as a means to more weight loss. I’ve actually known of distance runners who’ve gained weight during training! So, temper your weight loss expectations if you’re a distance runner. Run for the health of it! Run for the endorphin rush of it. Run for the joy of it!

Tony Ludlow, USMC Fitness Boot Camp Memphis

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UNCLE RHABDO — Sgt. Tony Ludlow, USMC Fitness Boot Camp, Memphis, TN 1/22/2014

Jan. 22nd 2014

[This is the final installment of “An Exercise Manifesto.” The entire piece can be read here: http://usmcfitnessbootcamp.com/blog/2014/01/22/an-exericse-manifesto/]

The runner and the powerlifter are good at what they do, but their approach to over all fitness is terribly lacking. And though I’m highlighting these two athletes, this applies to all of those who participate in programs and sports that are lacking in the elements of over all fitness and health.

One of the problems of any narrow range fitness program, or one dimensional athleticism, is safety. Or more precisely, injury. Without periodization, each group of athletes and exercisers suffers from a heightened risk of injury, especially overuse injury. For example, tennis players and baseball pitchers are notoriously prone to overuse shoulder injuries.

Safety and injury aren’t always the same thing. Every form of exercise comes with a certain amount of risk. I’ve pulled the muscles of my back bending over to pick up a pair of socks. No physical movement comes without some measure of risk. Just getting out of bed can be dicey! That said, the exerciser must strike a balance between the risk and reward of exercise while factoring in the person’s goals and objectives. For the average person, there’s little data to guide them toward an exercise program that strikes that balance.

If you’d like to train like a football player or power lifter, cross fit might be a good choice. However, since cross fit isn’t based on tracking a single athlete over the course of a calendar year, there isn’t any periodization. So there is the constant push to lift more and testing the limits of someone’s abilities toward some sort of goal, injury, or self-imposed break. Injuries and people’s inconsistent schedules often serve as that break, that unintended window of down time and recovery for cross fitters. One Physical Therapy professor at the University of Tennessee said recently that cross fit is “the BEST thing that ever happened to physical and occupational therapy because people are getting hurt so often.” But if the choice is between sedentary living or cross fitting, I’d recommend cross fit. The risk of most any exercise program is generally lower than the harm of a sedentary lifestyle. Cross fit might hurt you, but the couch will kill you. That being said, the cross fit community does have, in addition to the risks associated with the culture of cross fit and the higher than average number of injuries associated with exercise programs in general, is the risk of rhabdomyolysis. Rhabdomyolysis is the breakdown of muscle fibers that leads to the release of muscle fiber contents (myoglobin) into the bloodstream. Myoglobin is harmful to the kidney and often causes kidney damage. Cross fitters have even given this condition a cartoon and a nickname: “Uncle Rhabdo.” But I don’t think anyone suffering from rhabdomyolysis would think it’s funny.

Before I get accused of being unkind to the cross fitters, let me say that the exercises they do, in and of themselves, are fine. In fact, they’re great! I’ve done them all myself … since I was a teenager. They’re typical exercises that you’ll find every high school football team doing. The problem is, there’s an unsafe approach and strategy to their “workout of the day,” also known as “wod” in cross-fit-speak. That approach and strategy, without periodization, leads to injury. Guaranteed. For that reason I don’t recommend it. The cross fitters also suffer from what could be most charitably described as “extreme and acute self congratulation.” Kind of like that coffee shop in “Elf.” (I’ve even heard that there is a “World’s Best Boot Camp” program out there. Apparently the terms “world’s best” or “the best” can be claimed by anyone. As far as I know, I make the “World’s Best French Toast.”) The cult-like culture and arrogance of the program is a little off-putting, but the risks associated with the program is the most alarming thing about the program. But as I said before, if the choice is between cross fit or doing nothing, cross fit gets my nod. In just about 100% of the cases, if the choice is between XYZ Exercise Program or doing nothing, the choice is always going to be XYZ. Movement is life. When you stop moving, it’s over.

There are plenty of exercise programs that have a good return on the investment of time and money and have a lower risk of injury. It you want to train like a dancer, then pure barre, or something similar, would be the program for you, offering both muscle tone and balance and the lower risk of injury. Ballet has some great benefits and a little lower risk. NFL wide receivers have been known to take ballet in the off-season to develop more balance and fluid movement. Yoga is great for flexibility and stress management. Spin classes offer a great cardio workout with excellent leg muscle strength and stamina training. Zumba is a great cardio workout, but the movements done barefooted can often lead to injuries such as Achilles tendon pulls. But while these different exercise regimens, and others like them, offer fine results, the results are limited to addressing only a few of the five elements of effective fitness.

There are three things that all of us have in limited supply: 1) time, 2) energy, and 3) money. We must all learn to manage those things as judiciously as possible. When I started USMC Fitness Boot Camp in 1999, I was doing it for myself. Because of my teaching and coaching responsibilities, I had no time to exercise, so I had to carve out a place in my schedule for my own workouts. Preferably at a time when I would also have enough energy for the workout. That’s how the 5:30am time slot was chosen. Then I had to design an approach and a strategy that would address the five elements of fitness and be affordable for someone on a budget like mine. With those things in mind, and with the Marine Corps’ approach to training to guide me, the workouts took shape and have evolved over the years.

Our program has been called “an early morning exercise cult,” “a hardcore high school PE class,” “a comedy club with exercise subtitles,” “a home away from home,” “the best happy hour in town,” and my favorite: “Sgt. Tony’s Band of Misfit Memphians.” What ever it is, there are things that we aren’t. We aren’t a football team, so we aren’t going to train like one. We aren’t a powerlifting club, so our workouts aren’t going to be based on that strategy. We aren’t a body builder program, so our approach will not be their approach. What we aren’t is almost as important as what we are. That is by design. That is done on purpose.

What we are is a practical, balanced, safe, and affordable exercise program that honors the Marine Corps in spirit and philosophy, is designed for full body workouts for a lifetime, addressing all five of the elements of fitness in an atmosphere of fun, support, friendship, encouragement, and camaraderie. Our’s isn’t a program or organization for the super competitive, the neurotic, the narcissistic, the ego centric, or the judgmental. The only person we’re in competition with is the person we were yesterday.

Are we the best fitness program in existence? Well of course we are! Our definition of fitness says that we are! Are we the right program for everyone? Of course not.

And now back to the question about buying a bike. Which exercise program is right for you? There are benefits, risks, and drawbacks associated with any exercise program. What you choose has a lot to do with what your training is for. What do you intend to get from the program and then what do you intend to do with what you get? Are your goals athletic? Health? Weight loss? Vitality? Vanity? Weighing the risks of the program with the benefits, and then plugging those benefits into your action plans to reach whatever your particular goals might be, seems to make the most sense to me.

One of the obstacles to regular exercise is in the amount of time and effort invested and the return on that investment. For people who workout early before work or school, there’s the effort required to get up early in the morning and get out of a warm bed, get out in the cold and dark, and then make it to an early morning workout. This is compared to the relatively small progress and improvement someone gets from each workout. The gains and advancement are seen in small increments, while weighed against the enormous effort it seems required to get to the workout. People often quit because the benefits and results are slow to be seen, but the efforts and discomfort to overcome those obstacles is easily catalogued from day to day. But fitness, like many endeavors that require a lot of work to see a small amount of progress is worth it! Building things like The Great Pyramids, The Transcontinental Railroad, and the Panama Canal took enormous daily toil to make small and slow progress, just like fitness. Put another way, it can be much like investing in the stock market. Over time those investments typically pay off, but with exercise, they always do!

If weight loss is one of your goals, you should know that some exercises burn more calories during that activity (running, cross-country skiing, etc.) and others burn fewer calories during the actual exercise, like traditional weight lifting. The calorie burn of running ends with the run. But the calorie burn of weight training ends sometime after the activity is finished, sometimes up to an hour after the weight workout is over! It is highly possible that both forms of exercise burn the same amount of calories over the course of a day.

You can’t out run a bad diet. If you eat too much, you can get “fit” but you won’t lose weight. So an adjustment in calories consumed has to be addressed in order to lose the weight. There are many good, safe, and legitimate weight loss programs, that is, calorie reduction programs, that are effective. But be wary of any program that is restrictive of certain food groups or promises weight loss of more than 2 to 3 pounds per week (especially for someone who is not obese). Those programs should be viewed with great skepticism. You must do the research. You’ll want to look for the involvement of nutrition professionals connected with the diet program you choose; Registered Dietitians are at the top of the field in nutrition. Whenever the television news programs consult someone about food, diets, and nutrition, they always rely on a Registered Dietitian. Practically anyone can call themselves a “nutritionist” or a “food enthusiast,” so choose wisely. Avoid extremes. There are few areas of our culture — outside or politics and religion — where ignorance and extremism seem to go unchecked and unchallenged quite like diet plans, supplement claims, and other food restriction diet plans. Many of those cashing in on the ignorance, extremism, and pseudo-science are remarkable in the cash flow coming from book sales, expensive and unneeded supplements to purchase, and overpriced food packages to sign up for, often through multilevel marketing companies that require contracts and auto-ship agreements. Most of the overpriced, unnecessary, pseudo-scientific supplements aren’t harmful, but they can be an unneeded distraction and expense. And in many cases, they can give you false hope and unsustainable results. Bottom line: You simply must vet your program with solid research and consultation with real professionals, with real credentials, with real certifications, from real accredited institutions, with a weather eye on your wallet.

Losing weight isn’t really the major challenge when losing weight, as odd as that may sound. The real trick is to keep the weight off. The more the “diet” resembles your normal eating patterns and habits, the more likely you’ll keep the weight off. Wouldn’t it be great if we could lose weight as quickly as we gained it? Losing weight steady and slowly over time is the key to keeping it off.

Finally, I celebrate the physical movement of all exercise programs in our community and the efforts of all to be more active, to be healthy, and to bring their weight under control, even if the program or activity is one dimensional or potentially dangerous. The risk of being inactive is infinitely higher than the risk of being involved in programs that might be questionable or high risk. In recent years, our city has been listed as one of the fattest and most unhealthy cities in the country. But those days are behind us. We’re getting better! So the more we move, the more we work, the fitter and healthier we are as a community, the better it is for all of us. The healthier we are as a community, the more vibrant we are, and the more we attract other businesses, energy, and industry to our city. And, I dare say, the happier we’ll be!

— 30 —

Tony Ludlow, USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP, Memphis
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23rd HALF MARATHON TRAINING BEGINS THIS SUNDAY, JANUARY 26TH!

Our 23rd Half Marathon Training Session will begin on Sunday morning, Jan. 26th at 7am.

We’ll meet in front of the Visitor’s Center at Shelby Farms. All are welcome!!!

The prerequisite for doing the training is simple: If you can cover 3 miles in 36 minutes or less, you’re good to go!

I’ve trained hundreds and hundreds of people to run a half marathon and I can train you too! In fact, using this same method of training, many have run their fastest 13.1 mile half! That said, our weekend runs are NOT about speed! Speed work is done, if done at all, during the week. More about that later!

Cost for the three month training:
$75 for Active Duty Boot Campers
$125 for all others.

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INCLEMENT WEATHER POLICY

We’ll follow the decision of the Shelby County School System. If the public schools in Memphis close, we’ll stand down. However, if the decision to close school is based strictly on the temperature, as was the case recently, we will be ON!

If the “FEELS LIKE” temperature is 32 or below, we’ll move the Quarterdeck inside. The 0645 class is inside from now until March Madness.

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CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR STAFF DIETITIAN!

Ashley is now a Razorback! She was accepted into the Graduate School of the University of Arkansas to pursue further master’s degree level studies in nutrition and aging! Undergrad work at San Diego State University, graduate degree work at UT Martin, and now graduate degree studies at Arkansas! We’re pretty lucky to have her! (So am I!)

And now, her nutrition column!

TODAY’S NUTRITION TALK
by Sergeant Ashley Hofeditz, Registered Dietitian, LDN

(A Registered Dietitian has a BS in Food Science, followed by a one year internship through an accredited university, and then with the recommendation of the internship program’s supervisor, a national examination is required. After that, an RD must have continuing education units annually in order to remain active and registered. An RD is an expert, not a hobbyist or a “food enthusiast.”)

Supplement Sense

Dietary supplements have been around for a long time and their popularity continues to rise. Sales in the United States rose 7 percent to $11.5 billion in 2012. Often, supplements claim to help you recover faster from a hard workout, or provide fuel and fluid needed during long endurance events. Many supplements also claim to help you lose weight quickly. Although many Americans use dietary supplements, a 2009 report from the U.S. Government Accountability Office stated that “according to experts, consumers are not well-informed about the safety and efficacy of dietary supplements and have difficulty interpreting labels on these products.” While supplements can help some people meet their nutrition needs, eating a wide variety of nutrient-rich foods is the best way for most people to obtain the nutrients they need to be healthy and reduce their risk of chronic disease, according to a newly updated position paper titled “Nutrient Supplementation” from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The Academy offers the following tips on what you should know before choosing supplements.

Things you should know:
Dietary supplements are not well standardized—what the package says and what the product actually contains can be very different.
Dietary supplements are not well regulated by the Food and Drug Administration.
Supplements can go to market without any proof that they work or are safe.
“Natural” does not equal safe. They still can contain banned substances.
It is important to learn to be a critical consumer of advertisements for supplements and to read supplement labels. Ask your friendly Registered Dietitian to help you determine whether a supplement will help your performance.

Tony Ludlow, USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP, Memphis
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PFT

Beginning this month, we’ll run a Physical Fitness Test every month on the last Thursday. Our first PFT for 2014 will be on Thursday, 30 January!

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FACEBOOK RESULTS!!!!!!!

WE HAVE OVER 4000 LIKES ON FACEBOOK!

Invite your friends to “like” our USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP Facebook page. You can do that directly from our Facebook page. Just go to the page and you’ll see a section on the right that will allow you to easily invite your friends to like the page. In particular, your Memphis friends!

This may be the first seed to sow in helping a friend get back into exercise and fitness! They can get exposed to what goes on, they’ll be more likely to make a change and maybe even join you on The Quarterdeck!

Encourage your friends and family to “Like” the page! It might motivate your friends and family to take charge of their lives!

Keep on checking in! Keep on tagging your friends! Over 50% of new members over the past 6 months have listed Facebook as the source where they first heard about us!

Thanks, everyone!
Tony Ludlow, USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP, Memphis
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MAKE A $&(#&@^#!*% FACE!!!!

INCREASE YOUR WEIGHTS!

YOU GET OUT WHAT YOU PUT IN!

What you get out of the workouts is determined by you.

How much do you work? How much effort you put into trying to do all of the repetitions with proper form and how much weight you’re using will determine what you get out of each workout.

YOU DETERMINE WHETHER YOUR WORKOUT IS KICKASS OR NOT!

It’s time for you to go up in weights … that’s what I’m thinking!

MAKING A FACE (THE GRIMACE) IS THE POOR MAN’S (OR WOMAN’S) FACELIFT!

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EVERY WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY IS T-SHIRT DAY!

WEAR YOUR RANK INSIGNIA SHIRT, SUB 7 SHIRT, OR OTHER USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP SHIRT!

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SUB SEVEN CLUB!

Members of the Sub-7 Club are Boot Campers who’ve run the mile in under 7 minutes under my observation and timing.

Congratulations to the following members of the Sub Seven Club:

Corporal Lee Chase,
Corporal Chris McLelland,
Staff Sergeant Patrick Moore,
Staff Sergeant Rob Johnston,
Staff Sergeant Andrew Stolnicki,
Gunnery Sergeant Bart Thomas,
Staff Sergeant Dory Sellers,
Gunnery Sergeant Henry Kenworthy,
Master Sergeant John Winford,
First Sergeant Matt Green,
And Sergeant Major Andrew Forsdick.

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VETERAN BOOT CAMPERS!

Your rank insignia t-shirts look AWESOME on you! (Don’t forget to wear yours EVERY WEDNESDAY AND/OR THURSDAY, T-SHIRT DAY!

Every Wednesday is our Official BOOT CAMP T-SHIRT DAY! You can wear your rank insignia shirt anytime you‘d like, of course, but always every Wednesday!

Tony Ludlow, USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP, Memphis

The Rank Structure of the Quarterdeck:

Under 6 months is a Private
Six months to 1 year is a Private First Class.

Over 1 year is a Lance Corporal
– Pam Torres – meritoriously promoted 12/2012
– Rachel Phillips 2/2012
– Teresa Reed 2/2012
– Alan Compton 4/2012
– Natalie Mannon 5/2012
– Steve Havard 5/2012
– Emma Crystal 5/2012
– Megan Collins 6/2012
– Maria Wyatt 6/2012
– Beth Stengel 2/2012
– Chris Kelley 6/2102
– Susye Clark 7/2012
– Victoria Tigrett 8/2012
– Crystal Bloodworth 8/2012
– Lora Gubanov 8/2012
– Shelia Johnson 8/2012
– Orli Weisser-Pike 9/2012
– Morgan Johnson 10/2012
– ShaWanda Upshaw 10/2012
– Chuck Miller 11/2012
– Diane Gorney 12/2012
– Lexie Johnston 12/2012

Over 2 years is a Corporal
– Paul Bauer 11/2010
– Jeremy Harris 1/2009*
– Courtney Phillips 2/2011
– Robin Scott 3/2011
– Chris McLelland 3/2011
– JD Dombroski 4/2011
– Randal Rhea 4/2011
– Cindy King 4/2011
– Sherri Thompson 4/2011
– Becky Lawler 5/2010*
– Carrie Schule 5/2011
– Bevan Lee 5/2011
– Melissa Thompson 5/2011
– Michelle Moss 5/2011
– Mary Bauer 6/2011
– Lee Chase 7/2011
– Tait Keller 8/2011
– Heath Anderson 9/2011
– Lindsey Stanfill 9/2011
– Tara Ingram 11/2011

Over 3 years is a Sergeant
– Cecelia DeLacy 2/2010
– Malinda Miller 3/2010
– Ashley Hofeditz 4/2010
– Beth Mills 5/2010
– Emily Melonas 6/2010
– Keith Renard 6/2009*
– Ashley McClure 7/2010
– Falana Scott 7/2010
– Jenni Harris 8/2010
– Anne Marie Wyatt 8/2010
– Tim Romanow 8/2010

Over 4 years is a Staff Sergeant
– Jonathan Phillips 10/2008*
– Scott Plunkett 10/2008
– Shena Clemons 10/2008
– Jessie Flanders 1/2009
– Andrew Stolnicki 1/2009
– Ben Killerlain 1/2009
– Paul Tronsor 3/2009
– Teresa Faulk 6/2009
– Sarah Vickers 8/2009
– Robert Hunt 8/2009
– Cameron Mosley 11/2009
– Karen Massey 11/2009

Over 5 years is a Gunnery Sergeant
– George Rose 10/2007
– Frank Jemison 10/2007
– Patty Dougherty 3/2008
– Oscar Adams 3/2008
– Patty Dougherty 3/2008
– Rob Johnston 4/2008
– Alan Schaeffer 4/2008
– Buddy Daves 5/2008
– Mike Ryan 5/2006*
– Dory Sellers 6/2006*
– Albo Carruthers 8/2008
– Anne Kenworthy 8/2008
– Patrick Moore 9/2008

Over 6 years is a Master Sergeant
– Jeff Lee 1/2006
– Anne Mead 2/2005*
– Michelle Dunn 3/2007
– Henry Kenworthy 5/2007
– Leslie Garey 6/2007
– Beth Rehrig 7/2007
– Matt Prince 8/2007

Over 7 years is a First Sergeant
– Kay Shelton 1/2006
– Leesa Jensen 5/2006
– Megan Warr 8/2006
– Rob Norcross 8/2006
– Kay Ryan 10/2006

Over 8 years is a Sergeant Major
– Melissa Moore 2/2005
– Louis Glazer 3/2005
– Matt Green 5/2005
– Mike Barta 6/2005*
– Anne Emmerth 6/2005*
– Gary Thompson 10/2005
– Scot Bearup 10/2005

Over 9 years is a Warrant Officer 1
– David Townsend 1/2004
– Hank Brown 3/2004
– Andrew Forsdick 9/2004

Over 10 years is a Chief Warrant Officer 2
– Peter Pettit 5/2003
– Buddy Flinn 7/2003
– Amy Singer 9/2003

Over 11 years is a Chief Warrant Officer 3
– Pat McGhee 1/2003
– John Whittemore 1/2003

Battalion Executive Officer
Major Richard Bourland, 9/2003

* broken time

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ARE WE FACEBOOK FRIENDS?

We should be!

HAVE YOU “LIKED” THE USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP FACEBOOK PAGE?

You should totally do that!

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BOOT CAMP DISCOUNT

If you set up an automatic payment at your bank (Boot Camp mailing address is 4888 Southern, Memphis 38117) you can subtract $10 off your fee! That’s right, instead of $75, you can pay $65!

(This is not an automatic bank draft that I set up with a voided check. This an automatic payment that you yourself set up.)

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USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP CLASSES – NEW STUFF!

0530 Monday through Friday
(First and second Tuesday of the month are M-16 Workouts at CUMC. Third and fourth Tuesdays are Mt. Fuji Workouts at the U of M)

0645 M-F

5:45 PM: Monday through Thursday, 5:30 on Friday.

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BOOT CAMP DISCOUNTS AND FACEBOOK EXPERIMENT!

First of all, find me on Facebook and make me your friend. (Also, be sure to “like” USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP on Facebook.)

Here’s how the discount works!

It’s simple: make a Facebook status update and get a discount!

For every status update that you make that references:
“USMC Fitness Boot Camp,”
“Sgt. Tony’s Boot Camp,”
“Tony’s Boot Camp,”
or something similar, (there are fake boot camps out there) you can take $2.50 off your next reenlistment fee for each update!

You can take up to $20 off for any given month!

Your status update has to be a specific reference to USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP or to me specifically by name.

BE SURE TO TAG ME!

You can do the same thing by “checking in” at USMC Fitness Boot Camp either by using Facebook “places,” Foursquare, or any of the other “check in” apps that show up on your Facebook News Feed.

So log on and start getting your discounts now!

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Q. How can I get up in the morning on a consistent basis?
A. Contrary to what many think, I am NOT a morning person. I have to be “dynamited” out of the bed! Here are some tips to help you get going in the morning:
1. Use two alarm clocks. I have a snooze alarm that starts going off several minutes before I intend to get up. Then I have a “Last Call” alarm clock that is located across the room. This alarm clock is set to go off when I MUST get up.
2. Once the last call alarm goes off, the bed become OFF LIMITS! Get moving!
3. Get out of bed, turn off the alarm clock, and start turning on lights all through the house. Turn on the TV.
4. Lay out your clothes the night before. Don’t go wandering around the house in the morning trying to find your left shoe and your favorite shorts. So, have things ready the night before.

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What would you do if money was not an issue, fear was not a factor, and failure was not an option?

To your optimum health and fitness!

SEE YOU ON THE QUARTERDECK!

Tony

Sergeant Major Tony Ludlow

USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP, Commanding
Mailing address: 4888 Southern Ave., Memphis, TN 38117
Cell Phone: 901-644-0145

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