Sergeant Tony's Blog

Archive for September, 2013

Résumé? — Sgt. Tony Ludlow’s blog post for 9/26/2013

Sep. 26th 2013

I have one of those voice enabled GPS driving apps for my iPhone.

I use it like you do, when going somewhere unfamiliar. And like you, occasionally I miss an exit or take a wrong turn. As soon as that happens, as soon as I realize that I’ve made a mistake, I feel my heart rate rise, there’s a slight hesitation, and mild panic before the reassuring voice from my GPS says, “Recalculating.”

When we hear “recalculating,” we know that our device will soon give us a course correction. We breathe a sigh of relief, especially if we’re in a new city with traffic going by at 100mph!

Recalculating.
A course correction.

Yesterday, I read an article that was too good not to share. This is part of an article, written by Arianna Huffington, called “Are You Living Your Eulogy or Your Résumé?”

“Have you noticed that when people die, their eulogies celebrate life very differently from the way we define success in our everyday existence? Eulogies are, in fact, very Third Metric. At HuffPost we’ve made the Third Metric — redefining success beyond money and power to include well-being, wisdom and our ability to wonder and to give — a key editorial focus.

But while it’s not hard to live a Third Metric life, it’s very easy not to. It’s easy to let ourselves get consumed by our work. It’s easy to use work to let ourselves forget the things and the people that truly sustain us. It’s easy to let technology wrap us in a perpetually harried, stressed-out existence. It’s easy, in effect, to miss our lives even while we’re living them. Until we’re no longer living them.

For most of us, our eulogy will be not just the first formal marking down of what our lives were about but the only one. The eulogy is the foundational document of our legacy, of how people remember us, of how we live on in the minds and hearts of others. And it is very telling what you don’t hear in eulogies. You almost never hear things like:

‘Of course his crowning achievement was when he made senior vice president.’

Or:

‘What everybody loved most about her was how she ate lunch at her desk. Every day.’

Or:

‘He was proud that he never made it to one of his kid’s Little League games because he always wanted to go over those figures one more time.’

Or:

‘She didn’t have any real friends, but she had 600 Facebook friends, and she dealt with every email in her inbox every night.’

Or:

‘But he will live on, not in our hearts or memories, because we barely knew him, but in his PowerPoint slides, which were always meticulously prepared.’

No matter how much a person spends his or her life burning the candle at both ends, chasing a toxic definition of success and generally missing out on life, the eulogy is always about the other stuff: what they gave, how they connected, how much they meant to the lives of the real people around them, small kindnesses, lifelong passions and what made them laugh.”

There were several things in this article that caught my attention: “chasing a toxic definition of success” and the last phrase of the quote above, “… lifelong passions and what made them laugh.”

Recently I posted an awesome and inspirational video on the boot camp Facebook page that I really liked. The video is about encouraging people to work hard to achieve their dreams. The video ends with an impassioned, almost sermonic, “That’s how much you gotta want it!”

But what is “it?” And how much of “it” will be required to be enough, to be satisfied?

“It” is defined by each of us in different ways, often based on our personal value system and background. What do we want? For some it’s money. For others it’s fame. For others it’s a big this and a new that. And for others, it’s a sense of worth in how we help others, making an impact on the lives of those we encounter, making a difference in the world. Then do we choose careers and paths in life based on those things? Sometimes. At other times, we find ourselves on a path not of our choosing. We wander into a job, or stumble into a relationship that isn’t what we really want, but we don’t know how to make a change. Or we do, but we’re afraid to do it.

We probably all want to be happy, but we don’t always know what will make us happy in the end, so we often set our course for a distant place where “happiness” may be found based on the advice and counsel of others.

The funny thing about life is that going from one place or stage in life to another is seldom, if ever, a straight line. Few graduate from college and land their ideal job. Few start out a new career at the top of their industry. Life is unpredictable and messy; there are setbacks and quick successes, there is abundance and scarcity.

Life requires course corrections. Recalculations.

I’ve been married twice. Neither time did I get married with the intention of getting divorced. In both cases, when the wheels started to fall off I tried very hard to make things work, to avoid divorce, to avoid feeling like a failure, to make the incompatible compatible. But sadly, each marriage ended in the ditch. And though I make jokes about those divorces (better to laugh than to cry) – and though they were both needful (we’d grown apart, irreconcilably different) — both of them were difficult, painful, and heart wrenching recalculations.

I’ve done over 100 triathlons, probably closer to 125 or more. My first one was in 1979. As you know, triathlons begin with an open-water swim, either starting in a confused mass start of hundreds of swimmers thrashing and kicking in a human washing machine, trying to swim in the same small space of water. Or they start in a slightly less confused “time trial start” with each swimmer starting individually at 5 to 10 second intervals.

Triathlon swimming differs in several ways from lap swimming at the Y. The lanes at the local pool are usually roped off and you’ve got the whole lane to yourself. Sometimes you may share a lane with another person, but usually you’ve got the whole lane to yourself; no one to climb on top of you, kick you, push your head down, bump up against you, or pull your goggles off your head. All of which can, and usually does, happen in a triathlon.

One of the other ways that lap swimming at the Y differs from open-water swimming is in technique. At the pool, you can keep your head down and simply turn your head to the side to breathe. The black lane line painted on the bottom of the pool, and easily visible below you in the clear water of the pool, ensures that you’re going in the right direction. In the lake or ocean, there are no lane lines and no roped off lanes; the course is marked by large brightly colored buoys that everyone swims toward. This means that you have to make frequent course adjustments as you swim. Triathletes must lift their heads up and take a split second scan, trying to catch sight of the buoy. It’s a quick nanosecond look and then it’s back to swimming with other triathletes surrounding you, breathing down your back and climbing all over you. As you might guess, it’s not uncommon for triathletes to panic, and to zig-zag all over the course. Few take a straight line, and many get so far off course that a race official in a canoe or kayak has to paddle after them to get them back on course! That may, or may not, have happened to me once or ten times.

Life is like that, confusing and chaotic at times. Without frequent scans to find your buoy, to get your bearings, to find your way, it’s easy to wander off course.

In life, it’s easy to find yourself living someone else’s dream, fulfilling someone else’s pursuits, living by someone else’s orientation and interpretation of the course ahead. Without taking charge of your own life, you end up living someone else’s, stuck with their values, living according to their priorities and motivations, going through life following their ambitions, or in some cases, burdened by their lack of ambition and the weight of their baggage.

Living your eulogy instead of your resume — seriously living that way — changes things. If you genuinely live with the intention of writing your eulogy with your life — giving your eulogist things to say — your life, your career, your relationships undergo necessary, and in some cases, dramatic alterations.

For me, I experienced my greatest recalculation when I turned 40. I was told that it was “middle-aged crazy,” that I was just going through a phase.

But I knew that it was more than that. I knew that it wasn’t just some “phase,” and that I’d “snap out of it.” I knew that more was going on. I started asking questions, started reexamining my life, my career, my relationships, and the aim and trajectory of my life if I didn’t change things. Where was I going? Why was I going there? Was the “there” somewhere that I genuinely wanted to go? Who was I going to go there with?

For me, it was the triathlon equivalent of raising my head straight up out of the water and looking for the buoy.

I realized that I was way off course. I realized that my future and the things I wanted for my life weren’t on the course I was traveling.

You would think that making changes like that would be met with awesome support and encouragement from people who loved me. But that wasn’t the case. A change in your life will result in a change in theirs, and most people aren’t open to change. We resist the change, but change is inevitable. And having the courage to make those changes – the ones YOU want — is often the difference between living a good life and living a great one. It’s the difference between living according to your authentic self and living as a reluctant bit player in someone else’s version of your life.

So, are you “Living Your Eulogy or Your Résumé?” If you died today, what would the person delivering your eulogy say?

— 30 —

People who succeed find a way, people who fail find an excuse.

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This just in from an anonymous (for now) Boot Camper:

“I’ve officially been coming to Boot Camp for 6 months, mostly 4 days a week (I’ve only made a C about a handful of times!)…and I’ve lost 25 pounds! Six months ago, I could barely run from the bottom of Mt Fuji to the first “station,” much less around the fence line (not exaggerating!!). Now, I’m running and average of 2 four-mile runs, a 2-mile run, and a “long” run (last week I went 9 miles in 90 minutes, up from the 8 I already told you about!). So thankful and excited!!”

CONGRATULATIONS!!

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HALF MARATHON TRAINING SUNDAY

Buffalo Runners!

We’ll be back at Shelby Farms on Sunday at 7am!

Be sure to bring your hydration and fuel! See you Sunday!

Cost: $75 for active duty boot campers.
$125 for non-active duty boot campers or “friends of boot camp.”

If you’re running the MRTC Road Race Series, you can still train with me and you can take $30 off the above fee!

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TODAY’S NUTRITION TALK
by Sergeant Ashley Hofeditz, RD LDN,
(An Registered Dietitian has a BS in Food Science, followed by a one year internship through an accredited university, and then with the recommendation of the internship program’s supervisor, a national examination is required. After that, an RD must have continuing education units annually in order to remain active and registered. An RD is an expert, not a hobbyist or a “food enthusiast.”)

The Skinny on Trans Fats

What exactly are trans fats, why they aren’t so healthy for us, and which foods contain them? Let’s get the skinny on trans fats.

Though meat and dairy products naturally contain trace amounts of trans fat, most trans fats are artificially made by bubbling hydrogen gas through vegetable oils, a process called partial hydrogenation. This process stabilizes the fat therefore it allows foods to stay fresh longer. It allows for a longer shelf-life for baked goods, allows frying oils to be used longer before breaking down, and gives foods made with trans fats a certain type of texture and “mouth feel” that you just don’t seem to get with other oils (think of pie crust).

Trans fats began appearing in foods in the early 1900’s with the invention of Crisco shortening. You can mainly find trans fat in products made with partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, such as vegetable shortenings, some margarines, crackers, candies, cookies, snack foods, salad dressings, and fried foods.

In July of 2002, the National Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Medicine made it official that trans fats have a negative effect on blood cholesterol levels and increase the risk of heart disease. We have all heard that saturated fats raise the risk of heart disease, but trans fats are even worse than saturated fats. Trans fats not only raise “bad” LDL cholesterol like saturated fats, but they also lower “good” HDL cholesterol. This is a double whammy to your cholesterol numbers. Studies also show that trans fats may increase triglyceride levels and cause inflammation, which increase the risk for heart disease and may also increase the risk of type II diabetes.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2006 required food manufacturers to list trans fats on the Nutrition Facts Label and on some supplement facts panels. But there is a loophole that you need to be aware of. Under the labeling regulations, any food that has less than 0.5 grams of trans fat per serving is allowed to list zero grams of trans fat on the label. Very sneaky!! The best way to know if you are taking in unwanted trans fats is to check the ingredients list of your foods for the words “shortening”, “partially hydrogenated” or “hydrogenated oils”, which indicate that the food contains trans fats. The higher up on the ingredient label that you find these words means a larger amount of trans fats in the product. Remember those 0.5 grams of trans fat can add up to several grams of unwanted trans fats a day.

Food labels do help us be aware of trans fats in the foods we buy at the supermarket, but do not help at all when we go out to eat. Many sit down and fast food restaurants continue to fry foods in trans fats laden oil. A large order of french fries can contain up to eight grams of trans fat. Fortunately, some restaurants and many food manufacturers have been working to phase out using trans fats in their products … having to list a high trans fat number on a food label can be quite a motivator. Some food manufacturers have said that this change has been difficult, because reformulating products can be expensive. Alternative oils can be more costly and most of the substitute oils do not bake up the same way as products made with trans fats. And as we all know, as consumers we can be quite picky about our food, we want the flakiness of our favorite baked goods, but don’t want these foods to have the trans fats in them that make the food so flaky and tasty! That is a big dilemma for food companies.

Nonetheless, changes are evident. You can buy trans fat free Crisco, Oreo’s, snack cakes, potato chips, and the Girl Scouts are making changes to their cookies too. Remember, most of the foods that are usually full of trans fats such as snack cakes and cookies, should already be quite limited in your diet. Now that these foods are being made without trans fats, they should still be a very small part of your diet. But it is good to know that these occasional foods are not as unhealthy as they once were!

******If you are interested in knowing a little bit of the science behind trans fat, read on. Do you remember hearing the terms “cis” and “trans” in organic chemistry? These are Latin terms that have to do with orientation or the arrangement of atoms on a molecule. Trans basically means “across” and cis means “on the same side” An easy way to think about this is to think about taking a trip on a plane. If you were going to take a transatlantic flight you would be flying across the Atlantic ocean, and if you were to take a cisatlantic flight you would be flying up or down the side of the Atlantic ocean … although I have never heard anyone say they were taking a cisatlantic flight, but if they wanted to use that term, technically it would be correct.

Now what would cis and trans look like on a molecule? First think of a straight stick as a double bond. If we attached two lollipops to the ends of the stick in a cis formation the two lollipops would BOTH be attached from either the top or from the bottom of the stick forming a crude U shape. If we attached the lollipops in a trans formation, one lollipop would be attached to the top of the end of the stick and one would be attached to the bottom end of the stick, forming a kind of zig zag pattern.

So how does this apply to fat? Unsaturated fats are normally in a cis formation. That means that the hydrogen atoms (the lollipops) are connected to the carbon atoms on the same side of the double bond (the stick). Through the process of partial hydrogenation where bubbling hydrogen gas is passed through vegetable oils, a process called partial hydrogenation. This process changes the formation of the hydrogen from the usual cis formation to the trans formation.

Why does this matter? Well, for molecules to form a solid, they have to be packed tightly together. And the U shape of cis molecules don’t pack down quite as well as the zig zag pattern. This tight packing helps to stabilizes the fat and make it more solid. Think about regular vegetable oil (a cis formation fat) it is liquid at room temperature. But Crisco which is a trans fat vegetable oil is a SOLID! Since a trans fat is more stable molecularly, it allows foods to stay fresh longer. How cool! Science is AWESOME!!!

Thank you, Ashley!

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GAME DAY T-SHIRTS

College football is BACK!!! Halleluiah!

Every Friday during football season is game day t-shirt day! Wear your alma mater’s colors and paraphernalia on Fridays. If your school doesn’t have a football team or you didn’t make it to college, feel free to adopt any school you like!

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FACEBOOK RESULTS!!!!!!!

WE HAVE OVER 3000 LIKES ON FACEBOOK!

Invite your friends to “like” our USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP Facebook page. You can do that directly from our boot camp page. Just go to the page and you’ll see a section on the right that will allow you to easily invite your friends to like the page. In particular, your Memphis friends!

This may be the first seed to sow in helping a friend get back into exercise and fitness! They can get exposed to what goes on, they’ll be more likely to make a change and maybe even join you on The Quarterdeck!

Encourage your friends and family to “Like” the page! It might motivate your friends and family to take charge of their lives!

Keep on checking in! Keep on tagging your friends!
Thanks, everyone!

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DID YOU START USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP IN JUNE, JULY, AUGUST, OR SEPTEMBER 2012 OR EARLIER AND DON’T HAVE YOUR T-SHIRT?

I am asking you veterans to fill out a card – I have them – with your name, number of years of service, and preferred t-shirt size!

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MAKE A $&(#&@^#!*% FACE!!!!

INCREASE YOUR WEIGHTS!

YOU GET OUT WHAT YOU PUT IN!

What you get out of the workouts is determined by you.

How much do you work? How much effort you put into trying to do all of the repetitions with proper form and how much weight you’re using will determine what you get out of each workout.

YOU DETERMINE WHETHER YOUR WORKOUT IS KICKASS OR NOT!

It’s time for you to go up in weights … that’s what I’m thinking!

MAKING A FACE (THE GRIMACE) IS THE POOR MAN’S (OR WOMAN’S) FACELIFT!

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EVERY WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY IS T-SHIRT DAY!

WEAR YOUR RANK INSIGNIA SHIRT, SUB 7 SHIRT, OR OTHER USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP SHIRT!

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SUB SEVEN CLUB!

Members of the Sub-7 Club are Boot Campers who’ve run the mile in under 7 minutes under my observation and timing.

Congratulations to the following members of the Sub Seven Club:

Corporal Lee Chase,
Corporal Chris McLelland,
Staff Sergeant Patrick Moore,
Staff Sergeant Rob Johnston,
Staff Sergeant Andrew Stolnicki,
Gunnery Sergeant Bart Thomas,
Staff Sergeant Dory Sellers,
Gunnery Sergeant Henry Kenworthy,
Master Sergeant John Winford,
First Sergeant Matt Green,
And Sergeant Major Andrew Forsdick.

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VETERAN BOOT CAMPERS!

Your rank insignia t-shirts look AWESOME on you! (Don’t forget to wear yours EVERY WEDNESDAY AND/OR THURSDAY, T-SHIRT DAY!

Every Wednesday is our Official BOOT CAMP T-SHIRT DAY! You can wear your rank insignia shirt anytime you‘d like, of course, but always every Wednesday!

The Rank Structure of the Quarterdeck:

Under 6 months is a Private
Six months to 1 year is a Private First Class.

Over 1 year is a Lance Corporal
– ShaWanda Upshaw 10/2011
– Tara Ingram 11/2011
– Pam Torres – meritoriously promoted 12/2012
– Rachel Phillips 2/2012
– Teresa Reed 2/2012
– Alan Compton 4/2012
– Natalie Mannon 5/2012
– Steve Havard 5/2012
– Emma Crystal 5/2012
– Megan Collins 6/2012
– Maria Wyatt 6/2012
– Beth Stengel 2/2012
– Chris Kelley 6/2102
– Susye Clark 7/2012
– Victoria Tigrett 8/2012
– Crystal Bloodworth 8/2012
– Lora Gubanov 8/2012
– Shelia Johnson 8/2012

Over 2 years is a Corporal
– Paul Bauer 11/2010
– Jeremy Harris 1/2009*
– Courtney Phillips 2/2011
– Robin Scott 3/2011
– Chris McLelland 3/2011
– JD Dombroski 4/2011
– Randal Rhea 4/2011
– Cindy King 4/2011
– Sherri Thompson 4/2011
– Becky Lawler 5/2010*
– Carrie Schule 5/2011
– Bevan Lee 5/2011
– Melissa Thompson 5/2011
– Michelle Moss 5/2011
– Mary Bauer 6/2011
– Lee Chase 7/2011
– Tait Keller 8/2011
– Heath Anderson 9/2011
– Lindsey Stanfill 9/2011

Over 3 years is a Sergeant
– Cameron Mosley 11/2009
– Karen Massey 11/2009
– Cecelia DeLacy 2/2010
– Malinda Miller 3/2010
– Ashley Hofeditz 4/2010
– Beth Mills 5/2010
– Emily Melonas 6/2010
– Keith Renard 6/2009*
– Ashley McClure 7/2010
– Falana Scott 7/2010
– Jenni Harris 8/2010
– Anne Marie Wyatt 8/2010
– Tim Romanow 8/2010

Over 4 years is a Staff Sergeant
– Jonathan Phillips 10/2008
– Scott Plunkett 10/2008
– Shena Clemons 10/2008
– Jessie Flanders 1/2009
– Andrew Stolnicki 1/2009
– Ben Killerlain 1/2009
– Paul Tronsor 3/2009
– Teresa Faulk 6/2009
– Sarah Vickers 8/2009
– Robert Hunt 8/2009

Over 5 years is a Gunnery Sergeant
– George Rose 10/2007
– Frank Jemison 10/2007
– Patty Dougherty 3/2008
– Oscar Adams 3/2008
– Patty Dougherty 3/2008
– Rob Johnston 4/2008
– Alan Schaeffer 4/2008
– Buddy Daves 5/2008
– Mike Ryan 5/2006*
– Dory Sellers 6/2006*
– Albo Carruthers 8/2008
– Anne Kenworthy 8/2008
– Patrick Moore 9/2008

Over 6 years is a Master Sergeant
– Kay Ryan 10/2006
– Jeff Lee 1/2006
– Anne Mead 2/2005*
– Michelle Dunn 3/2007
– Henry Kenworthy 5/2007
– Leslie Garey 6/2007
– Beth Rehrig 7/2007
– Matt Prince 8/2007

Over 7 years is a First Sergeant
– Gary Thompson 10/2005
– Scot Bearup 10/2005
– Kay Shelton 1/2006
– Leesa Jensen 5/2006
– Megan Warr 8/2006
– Rob Norcross 8/2006
– Ralph Braden 9/2006

Over 8 years is a Sergeant Major
– Melissa Moore 2/2005
– Louis Glazer 3/2005
– Matt Green 5/2005
– Mike Barta 6/2005*
– Anne Emmerth 6/2005*

Over 9 years is a Warrant Officer 1
– David Townsend 1/2004
– Hank Brown 3/2004
– Andrew Forsdick 9/2004

Over 10 years is a Chief Warrant Officer 2
– Pat McGhee 1/2003
– John Whittemore 1/2003
– Peter Pettit 5/2003
– Buddy Flinn 7/2003
– Amy Singer 9/2003

Battalion Executive Officer
Major Richard Bourland

* broken time

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ARE WE FACEBOOK FRIENDS?

We should be!

HAVE YOU “LIKED” THE USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP FACEBOOK PAGE?

You should totally do that!

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NEW BOOT CAMP DISCOUNT

If you set up an automatic payment at your bank (Boot Camp mailing address is 4888 Southern, Memphis 38117) you can subtract $10 off your fee! That’s right, instead of $75, you can pay $65!

(This is not an automatic bank draft that I set up with a voided check. This an automatic payment that you yourself set up.)

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USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP CLASSES – NEW STUFF!

0530 Monday through Friday
(First and second Tuesday of the month are M-16 Workouts at CUMC. Third and fourth Tuesdays are Mt. Fuji Workouts at the U of M)

0645 M-F

5:45 PM: Monday through Thursday, 5:30 on Friday.

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BOOT CAMP DISCOUNTS AND FACEBOOK EXPERIMENT!

First of all, find me on Facebook and make me your friend. (Also, be sure to “like” USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP on Facebook.)

Here’s how the discount works!

It’s simple: make a Facebook status update and get a discount!

For every status update that you make that references:
“USMC Fitness Boot Camp,”
“Sgt. Tony’s Boot Camp,”
“Tony’s Boot Camp,”
or something similar, (there are fake boot camps out there) you can take $2.50 off your next reenlistment fee for each update!

You can take up to $20 off for any given month!

Your status update has to be a specific reference to USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP or to me specifically by name.

BE SURE TO TAG ME!

You can do the same thing by “checking in” at USMC Fitness Boot Camp either by using Facebook “places,” Foursquare, or any of the other “check in” apps that show up on your Facebook News Feed.

So log on and start getting your discounts now!

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CALENDAR

A calendar has been added to the official USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP website.
http://www.usmcfitnessbootcamp.com/calendar.html

For you visual learners, you’ll find this an easy way to glance at the week or month and see where the workouts will be, if there’s a venue change.

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Q. How can I get up in the morning on a consistent basis?
A. Contrary to what many think, I am NOT a morning person. I have to be “dynamited” out of the bed! Here are some tips to help you get going in the morning:
1. Use two alarm clocks. I have a snooze alarm that starts going off several minutes before I intend to get up. Then I have a “Last Call” alarm clock that is located across the room. This alarm clock is set to go off when I MUST get up.
2. Once the last call alarm goes off, the bed become OFF LIMITS! Get moving!
3. Get out of bed, turn off the alarm clock, and start turning on lights all through the house. Turn on the TV.
4. Lay out your clothes the night before. Don’t go wandering around the house in the morning trying to find your left shoe and your favorite shorts. So, have things ready the night before.
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What would you do if money was not an issue, fear was not a factor, and failure was not an option?

To your optimum health and fitness!

SEE YOU ON THE QUARTERDECK!

Tony

Sergeant Major Tony Ludlow

USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP, Commanding
Mailing address: 4888 Southern Ave., Memphis, TN 38117
Cell Phone: 901-644-0145

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DUCK DYNASTY — Sgt. Tony Ludlow’s blog post for 9/20/2013

Sep. 20th 2013

I have a few faults.

OK, more than just a few.

I know that this won’t come as a surprise to you; not that I have faults, but that I would admit that I have them.

One of my faults is that I’m sometimes bad about holding a grudge. I know it’s wrong and that I shouldn’t do it. But it’s pretty hard. You see it’s not a failure on my part to forgive someone; I can do that. In fact, being quick to forgive hasn’t always served me well. Most of the time I’m too ready and too willing to forgive. It sometimes gives the users and the unscrupulous an opportunity to hurt me or take advantage of me a second time.

But when I’ve been slighted or insulted and the person never apologizes, I don’t do well with that. If someone tells lies about me, slanders me, betrays me, or steals from me, I’ve held that against them. I’ve justified my behavior in the past by saying that not even God forgives offenders unless and until the offender asks for forgiveness. (At least that’s the consensus view among most religious representatives.)

If I’ve been slighted, insulted, or offended, I don’t do very well with forgetting that. I’m pretty sure that the men who helped raise me taught me this. I was raised in the company of proud men who had a certain sense of honor, and respect, and conduct, and expectation for how men are to behave and respond. John Wayne, in his last movie, the 1976 “The Shootist,” had a line that solidified what I believed and had been taught. That line codified my belief system, so to speak:

“I won’t be wronged. I won’t be insulted. I won’t be laid a-hand on. I don’t do these things to other people, and I require the same from them.”

If it was good enough for The Duke, it was good enough for me, I reasoned. By the way, “The Shootist” is a great movie.

I have other faults. I have trouble being sympathetic towards people who cause trouble for themselves and others, especially when they’ve been advised, warned, counseled, and otherwise begged not to do x, y, and z and it goes south when they go on ahead and do x, y, and z. Like when you tell a friend not to date some absolute loser but they do it anyway and the “relationship” becomes toxic and harmful. Things like that.

I’ve decided to quit being passive about something that I struggle with. I struggle with the attitude that exercise is a hobby, like golf, or fishing, or NASCAR. I struggle with hearing people whine about the condition of their poor physical health and their slow-motion-train-wreck of a life when they reject the very thing – exercise – that would rescue them.

I don’t know if that’s a fault or not. But I do know that if I don’t write the following, that it would be wrong.

For my whole adult life I’ve been labeled “an exercise person” or “a health nut.” As if being healthy, living healthy, and living a disciplined healthy life was the same thing as gun collecting or gardening.

Exercise isn’t optional it’s essential!

The fact that you can choose to ignore it or choose not to participate does not mean that it isn’t necessary!

Exercise is often associated with vanity or narcissism and it’s true that you can find folks whose fitness goals aren’t exactly to be healthy, but to look good. I don’t care. If the result is health and wellness and fitness, I don’t care what the person’s reasons were.

Obesity, poor health decisions, and high-risk lifestyle choices are ruining our lives, burdening our relationships, handicapping our communities, and poisoning our country.

Military recruiters can’t find recruits – even in a down economy – who can pass the physical fitness test because the prospects are fat and unfit. This is a growing national security crisis.

Instead of sounding the national alarm, the public discussion about obesity gets toned down so as not to hurt anyone’s feelings. Instead of a call to action, we build bigger seats on airplanes and buses and accommodate our failure to take proper care of ourselves. A shirt that was labeled a “large” 10 years ago, is now a “medium” for the same rationale.

We don’t say that someone is fat, we say that they’re big boned, or sturdy, or “thick.” Or we find some other euphemism to describe obesity.

And while cigarette smoking is down nationwide, it’s up among children and teenagers. Smoking is the leading cause of preventable illness and death in the United States, killing more than 440,000 people each year. It’s responsible for the majority of lung cancer deaths and is a deadly factor in heart attacks and a variety of other illnesses.

Why should I care? I care for the same reason the state of Tennessee requires you to wear a seatbelt and to properly restrain your child.

At our core, we are communities made up into a nation. What happens to one of us has rippling effects upon all of us. A shooting in South Memphis effects me in East Memphis because South Memphis is a part of my larger community and killing one another wholesale on the streets of my community is bad for my community.

From a health care standpoint, my neighbor’s obesity and poor health don’t just affect him alone. It impacts my community through rising healthcare costs and the inordinate and unnecessary consumption of limited healthcare resources by just one person in my community.

Exercise and living a healthy lifestyle won’t keep me from dying. The legendary fitness guru, Jack LaLanne (http://www.jacklalanne.com/), was my first fitness instructor. He always said that he couldn’t die because it would be bad for his reputation! Jack did die in January 2011 at the age of 96. But here’s the thing, he lived a vibrant, full, meaningful, relevant and energetic life all the way up to the end of his life.

I would suspect that Jack LaLanne cost the American healthcare system less than few hundred dollars a year.

Life is unpredictable and messy. I can’t control very much of what happens to me, but I can control my own behavior and my own habits. And so can you.

For a small investment of self-discipline and effort, people can change the quality of their lives, make their communities stronger, and reduce the costs of health care (sick care).

Healthy people are happier people, more involved in the organizations of their communities, schools, churches, and synagogues. They pay less in mental health care costs. They’re more resilient to disease and catastrophic illness. And the list of benefits goes on and on.

Here are 9 quotes from one of my favorite new philosophers. His wisdom is more than worth our attention. Ladies and gentlemen, Kid President! (Pay close attention to #5.)

1. “If there are two paths, I want to be on the one that leads to awesome”

2. “The world needs you to stop being boring”

3. “Create something that will make the world awesome”

4. “If life is a game, aren’t we all on the same team?”

5. “This is life people… you got air coming through your nose… you got a heart beat… it’s time to do something”

6. “Don’t stop believing, unless your dream is stupid… then get a better dream and keep going, keep going, keep going…”

7. “What will you create that will make the world more awesome… nothing if you’re just sitting there”

8. “You were made to be awesome”

9. “If everybody’s good, then it gives the world a reason to dance… so get to it!”

I hope one day to be as wise as Robby Novak, 10 year-old philosopher and genius.

— 30 —

Sorry, this essay had nothing to do with Duck Dynasty. I was just curious if I tricked anyone to read the whole essay looking for something about that show. Did I get you?

———————————-

HALF MARATHON TRAINING SUNDAY

Buffalo Runners!

The Problem: The MRTC 10K is this Sunday at Shelby Farms. Our park will be full of 2000+ runners (and their cars) and that’ll be problematic for us.

The Solution: We’ll meet at Christ Methodist at 7am and run in the neighborhood of our USMC Fitness Boot Camp host for this Sunday.

Be sure to bring your hydration and fuel! See you Sunday!

Cost: $75 for active duty boot campers.
$125 for non-active duty boot campers or “friends of boot camp.”

If you’re running the MRTC Road Race Series, you can still train with me and you can take $30 off the above fee!

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TODAY’S NUTRITION TALK
by Sergeant Ashley Hofeditz, RD LDN,
(A Registered Dietitian has a BS in Food Science, followed by a one year internship through an accredited university, and then with the recommendation of the internship program’s supervisor, a national examination is required. After that, an RD must have continuing education units annually in order to remain active and registered. RDs are experts, not hobbyists or a “food enthusiasts.”)

Chew On This

“Have you ever noticed that when you see Tony on the quarterdeck each morning or evening he has a stick of gum in his mouth? He also chews gum when he bikes and runs, as do I. We both have had the habit of chewing gum during exercise for as long as we can remember. We both know that chewing sugar free gum helps prevent tooth decay and gives us fresher breath! But another reason Tony chews gum is because it helps to keep his throat moist, which allows him to more comfortably yell out orders on the quarterdeck. Lucky us!

If you have never been a gum chewer, you may want to pick up a pack the next time you are at the store. There’s plenty of research that shows that our half-a-pack-a-day-habit may be more beneficial than we originally thought. Studies show that chewing gum may help increase focus, alertness, and concentration, reduces stress, and may even help people manage their weight.

According to the Wrigley Science Institute, research has shown that chewing gum may help improve alertness and concentration and can even improve a person’s ability to learn, retain, and retrieve information. One of the reasons that this may be true is because chewing gum appears to increase blood flow to the brain by about 25%. Some teachers are actually encouraging students to chew gum while test taking to help increase concentration.

Psychiatrists and psychologists suggest two of the reasons people chew gum are to relieve boredom and reduce tension. It can help people release nervous energy and provide an outlet for frustration and irritation. Many athletes and coaches chew gum to help reduce stress and to keep them focused. And another interesting fact is that since World War I, the U.S. Armed Forces have been putting chewing gum in field and combat rations to help increase alertness, ease tension, and improve oral health.

Popping in a stick of gum may also help you manage your weight. Chewing a 5 to 25 calorie stick of gum instead snacking on chocolate bar can save you a few hundred calories and can help prevent mindless munching. Preliminary studies show that chewing gum can suppress appetite, especially for sweets, and can reduce overall snack intake. Chewing gum can be quite a workout for your mouth, and just like real exercise, it does burn calories. Just don’t trade in your running shoes quite yet, since gum chewing only burns a whopping 11 calories an hour.”

Thank you, Ashley!

———————————————-

If you run with music, turn it down or use only one earbud. I recently bought an excellent single earbud (XDU Noise Isolating Earbud) from Far End Gear http://farendgear.com/xdu/)

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GAME DAY T-SHIRTS

College football is BACK!!! Halleluiah!

Every Friday during football season is game day t-shirt day! Wear your alma mater’s colors and paraphernalia on Fridays. If your school doesn’t have a football team or you didn’t make it to college, feel free to adopt any school you like!

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FACEBOOK RESULTS!!!!!!!

WE HAVE OVER 3000 LIKES ON FACEBOOK!

Invite your friends to “like” our USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP Facebook page. You can do that directly from our boot camp page. Just go to the page and you’ll see a section on the right that will allow you to easily invite your friends to like the page. In particular, your Memphis friends!

This may be the first seed to sow in helping a friend get back into exercise and fitness! They can get exposed to what goes on, they’ll be more likely to make a change and maybe even join you on The Quarterdeck!

Encourage your friends and family to “Like” the page! It might motivate your friends and family to take charge of their lives!

Keep on checking in! Keep on tagging your friends!
Thanks, everyone!

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DID YOU START USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP IN JUNE, JULY, AUGUST, OR SEPTEMBER 2012 OR EARLIER?

I am asking you veterans to fill out a card – I have them – with your name, number of years of service, and preferred t-shirt size!

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MAKE A $&(#&@^#!*% FACE!!!!

INCREASE YOUR WEIGHTS!

YOU GET OUT WHAT YOU PUT IN!

What you get out of the workouts is determined by you.

How much do you work? How much effort you put into trying to do all of the repetitions with proper form and how much weight you’re using will determine what you get out of each workout.

YOU DETERMINE WHETHER YOUR WORKOUT IS KICKASS OR NOT!

It’s time for you to go up in weights … that’s what I’m thinking!

MAKING A FACE (THE GRIMACE) IS THE POOR MAN’S (OR WOMAN’S) FACELIFT!

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EVERY WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY IS T-SHIRT DAY!

WEAR YOUR RANK INSIGNIA SHIRT, SUB 7 SHIRT, OR OTHER USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP SHIRT!

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SUB SEVEN CLUB!

Members of the Sub-7 Club are Boot Campers who’ve run the mile in under 7 minutes under my observation and timing.

Congratulations to the following members of the Sub Seven Club:

Corporal Lee Chase,
Corporal Chris McLelland,
Staff Sergeant Patrick Moore,
Staff Sergeant Rob Johnston,
Staff Sergeant Andrew Stolnicki,
Gunnery Sergeant Bart Thomas,
Staff Sergeant Dory Sellers,
Gunnery Sergeant Henry Kenworthy,
Master Sergeant John Winford,
First Sergeant Matt Green,
And Sergeant Major Andrew Forsdick.

———————————————-

VETERAN BOOT CAMPERS!

Your rank insignia t-shirts look AWESOME on you! (Don’t forget to wear yours EVERY WEDNESDAY AND/OR THURSDAY, T-SHIRT DAY!

Every Wednesday is our Official BOOT CAMP T-SHIRT DAY! You can wear your rank insignia shirt anytime you‘d like, of course, but always every Wednesday!

The Rank Structure of the Quarterdeck:

Under 6 months is a Private
Six months to 1 year is a Private First Class.

Over 1 year is a Lance Corporal
– ShaWanda Upshaw 10/2011
– Tara Ingram 11/2011
– Pam Torres – meritoriously promoted 12/2012
– Rachel Phillips 2/2012
– Teresa Reed 2/2012
– Alan Compton 4/2012
– Natalie Mannon 5/2012
– Steve Havard 5/2012
– Emma Crystal 5/2012
– Megan Collins 6/2012
– Maria Wyatt 6/2012
– Beth Stengel 2/2012
– Chris Kelley 6/2102
– Susye Clark 7/2012
– Victoria Tigrett 8/2012
– Crystal Bloodworth 8/2012
– Lora Gubanov 8/2012
– Shelia Johnson 8/2012

Over 2 years is a Corporal
– Paul Bauer 11/2010
– Jeremy Harris 1/2009*
– Courtney Phillips 2/2011
– Robin Scott 3/2011
– Chris McLelland 3/2011
– JD Dombroski 4/2011
– Randal Rhea 4/2011
– Cindy King 4/2011
– Sherri Thompson 4/2011
– Becky Lawler 5/2010*
– Carrie Schule 5/2011
– Bevan Lee 5/2011
– Melissa Thompson 5/2011
– Michelle Moss 5/2011
– Mary Bauer 6/2011
– Lee Chase 7/2011
– Tait Keller 8/2011
– Heath Anderson 9/2011
– Lindsey Stanfill 9/2011

Over 3 years is a Sergeant
– Cameron Mosley 11/2009
– Karen Massey 11/2009
– Cecelia DeLacy 2/2010
– Malinda Miller 3/2010
– Ashley Hofeditz 4/2010
– Beth Mills 5/2010
– Emily Melonas 6/2010
– Keith Renard 6/2009*
– Ashley McClure 7/2010
– Falana Scott 7/2010
– Jenni Harris 8/2010
– Anne Marie Wyatt 8/2010
– Tim Romanow 8/2010

Over 4 years is a Staff Sergeant
– Jonathan Phillips 10/2008
– Scott Plunkett 10/2008
– Shena Clemons 10/2008
– Jessie Flanders 1/2009
– Andrew Stolnicki 1/2009
– Ben Killerlain 1/2009
– Paul Tronsor 3/2009
– Teresa Faulk 6/2009
– Sarah Vickers 8/2009
– Robert Hunt 8/2009

Over 5 years is a Gunnery Sergeant
– George Rose 10/2007
– Frank Jemison 10/2007
– Patty Dougherty 3/2008
– Oscar Adams 3/2008
– Patty Dougherty 3/2008
– Rob Johnston 4/2008
– Alan Schaeffer 4/2008
– Buddy Daves 5/2008
– Mike Ryan 5/2006*
– Dory Sellers 6/2006*
– Albo Carruthers 8/2008
– Anne Kenworthy 8/2008
– Patrick Moore 9/2008

Over 6 years is a Master Sergeant
– Kay Ryan 10/2006
– Jeff Lee 1/2006
– Anne Mead 2/2005*
– Michelle Dunn 3/2007
– Henry Kenworthy 5/2007
– Leslie Garey 6/2007
– Beth Rehrig 7/2007
– Matt Prince 8/2007

Over 7 years is a First Sergeant
– Gary Thompson 10/2005
– Scot Bearup 10/2005
– Kay Shelton 1/2006
– Leesa Jensen 5/2006
– Megan Warr 8/2006
– Rob Norcross 8/2006
– Ralph Braden 9/2006

Over 8 years is a Sergeant Major
– Melissa Moore 2/2005
– Louis Glazer 3/2005
– Matt Green 5/2005
– Mike Barta 6/2005*
– Anne Emmerth 6/2005*

Over 9 years is a Warrant Officer 1
– David Townsend 1/2004
– Hank Brown 3/2004
– Andrew Forsdick 9/2004

Over 10 years is a Chief Warrant Officer 2
– Pat McGhee 1/2003
– John Whittemore 1/2003
– Peter Pettit 5/2003
– Buddy Flinn 7/2003
– Amy Singer 9/2003

Battalion Executive Officer
Major Richard Bourland

* broken time

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ARE WE FACEBOOK FRIENDS?

We should be!

HAVE YOU “LIKED” THE USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP FACEBOOK PAGE?

You should totally do that!

———————————–

NEW BOOT CAMP DISCOUNT

If you set up an automatic payment at your bank (Boot Camp mailing address is 4888 Southern, Memphis 38117) you can subtract $10 off your fee! That’s right, instead of $75, you can pay $65!

(This is not an automatic bank draft that I set up with a voided check. This an automatic payment that you yourself set up.)

—————————————

USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP CLASSES – NEW STUFF!

0530 Monday through Friday
(First and second Tuesday of the month are M-16 Workouts at CUMC. Third and fourth Tuesdays are Mt. Fuji Workouts at the U of M)

0645 M-F

5:45 PM: Monday through Thursday, 5:30 on Friday.

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BOOT CAMP DISCOUNTS AND FACEBOOK EXPERIMENT!

First of all, find me on Facebook and make me your friend. (Also, be sure to “like” USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP on Facebook.)

Here’s how the discount works!

It’s simple: make a Facebook status update and get a discount!

For every status update that you make that references:
“USMC Fitness Boot Camp,”
“Sgt. Tony’s Boot Camp,”
“Tony’s Boot Camp,”
or something similar, (there are fake boot camps out there) you can take $2.50 off your next reenlistment fee for each update!

You can take up to $20 off for any given month!

Your status update has to be a specific reference to USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP or to me specifically by name.

BE SURE TO TAG ME!

You can do the same thing by “checking in” at USMC Fitness Boot Camp either by using Facebook “places,” Foursquare, or any of the other “check in” apps that show up on your Facebook News Feed.

So log on and start getting your discounts now!

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CALENDAR

A calendar has been added to the official USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP website.
http://www.usmcfitnessbootcamp.com/calendar.html

For you visual learners, you’ll find this an easy way to glance at the week or month and see where the workouts will be, if there’s a venue change.

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Q. How can I get up in the morning on a consistent basis?
A. Contrary to what many think, I am NOT a morning person. I have to be “dynamited” out of the bed! Here are some tips to help you get going in the morning:
1. Use two alarm clocks. I have a snooze alarm that starts going off several minutes before I intend to get up. Then I have a “Last Call” alarm clock that is located across the room. This alarm clock is set to go off when I MUST get up.
2. Once the last call alarm goes off, the bed become OFF LIMITS! Get moving!
3. Get out of bed, turn off the alarm clock, and start turning on lights all through the house. Turn on the TV.
4. Lay out your clothes the night before. Don’t go wandering around the house in the morning trying to find your left shoe and your favorite shorts. So, have things ready the night before.
—————————————–

What would you do if money was not an issue, fear was not a factor, and failure was not an option?

To your optimum health and fitness!

SEE YOU ON THE QUARTERDECK!

Tony

Sergeant Major Tony Ludlow

USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP, Commanding
Mailing address: 4888 Southern Ave., Memphis, TN 38117
Cell Phone: 901-644-0145

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Protected: 23rd Half Marathon Training Session: Fall 2013: GOING THE DISTANCE

Sep. 15th 2013

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FINDING A WAY

Sep. 12th 2013

“We’ve got about 10 minutes left in the class, your homework assignment for the weekend is to read the next chapter in your textbook. You can get started now, or … I can tell you a story,” I’d say.

Teachers often find themselves with a need for “Friday Fillers.” My 6th grade teacher had an interesting “filler,” me! She gave me 15 minutes at the end of the school day on Fridays to tell stories, jokes, or any other thing that seemed entertaining. What looked like her giving in to my desire to entertain the class was really classroom-management-genius! See, what would happen was, if, for example, I were telling some story or joke or clowning with my friends during class on a Tuesday, in other words, disrupting class, she would say, “Tony, save that for Friday.” So then I’d get out my notebook and write down the joke or story or whatever. That made me stop, made me quiet, and it gave the attention of the classroom back to her. Genius! Plus, during those 15 minutes on Friday, she would grade papers and put the finishing touches on her next week’s lesson plans, ensuring that she didn’t have to work over her weekend! Genius!!!

On my Fridays as a teacher, I’d have typically already given the quiz for the previous chapter and graded it in class. By that time, my 11th grade US History students were tired and ready for a break. So when I’d suggest that they could start on the next chapter or hear a story for the last 10 minutes or so, they always always voted for the story.

“OK, a story it is! You can have the choice between a story where I’m the hero, or a story where I’m humiliated. Which do you want?” I’d ask. The kids always always wanted a humiliation story.

Fortunately for them, I have plenty.

I told humiliation stories so often that occasionally a smarty pants student would ask, “Coach, do you even have any hero stories? Hahahaha!”

This past weekend at the MS 150 bike ride – two days of riding 75 miles each day — I got another opportunity to learn some things through an athletic event. If I were asking my Friday US History students which story they’d prefer, this is the story they’d vote for. The humiliation story.

While not a race, per se, the MS 150 Bike Ride requires you to cover 75 miles each day and you can cover those miles at just about any pace you want. However, the longer you spend out on the course, the hotter it will get for you, and the more agonizing it becomes.

And did I mention that it was a very very hilly course?

Ashley Hofeditz, my awesome girlfriend and riding partner, and I left the Lander’s Center in Southaven, Mississippi along with 20 of our teammates and several hundred more riders. All of us had raised the minimum $300 to participate in the charity ride to raise money for MS research. With your help, Ashley and I raised over $3,000! (Thank you!)

Saturday morning was a little cool and slightly overcast when the ride started. Perfect weather. Group riding can be a little dicey and we hadn’t gotten but a few miles into it before someone crashed. I didn’t know the fella who went down, but he looked ok, if not a little embarrassed, and maybe a little banged up. But he got up, remounted, and started pedaling again! Good for you, sir!

Ashley and I had trained hard for months for this event; several weekends we’d ridden over 100 miles total for a Saturday/Sunday ride, with our longest single ride being over 80 miles. We felt prepared and ready!

Saturday’s ride had a lot of hills, more than I could imagine for north Mississippi. I’m no stranger to north Mississippi, but I had no idea it was so hilly. Fortunately, the temperatures were not too severe and we had a good amount of shade to keep the heat down, so it wasn’t too bad. In fact, I thought it was a fun ride with plenty of rest stops, called SAG stops, to get water, Gatorade, and a variety of things to eat. God bless volunteers at races and rides! Thank you!

After 65 miles of hills and dales, the course turned west to enter the Mississippi Delta.

The cool morning gave way to a blistering early afternoon sun and it was quickly heating things up. I had never entered the Delta from the east. Anytime I’d gone to Tunica for a show or other event, it had always been from the north and I was generally unaware of the topographical differences from the Delta and the Highlands. When you enter the Delta from the east, you leave the Highlands by going down a very very steep hill that stretches for a quarter of a mile or so. It’s a really really fun hill! That hill is part of the elevated bluff that separates the Highlands from the Delta and it runs along for miles and miles, probably all the way to Vicksburg or Natchez.

But let me tell you about that hill.

It must have been designed for kids riding bikes! I crested the hill and looked straight down it with a big grin on my face, shifted into my big gear, and pedaled hard! I went flying down the hill, getting faster as I went, gaining all of the speed that I could. (This was LOTS of fun!!) I stole a glance at my speedometer at one point and it read 45 MPH – wooooohoooooo!!! – I then quickly decided that taking my eyes off the road – while racing a bike with skinny tires down a hill at 45 MPH – wasn’t a very prudent thing to do! I may, or may not, have made that “weeeeeeeeeeeeee” sound that the little pig makes in the Geico commercial.

All of that fun evaporated as soon as we got to the bottom of the hill and were in the Mississippi Delta where it is flat, flat, flat and the sun had microwaved the blacktop, hot, hot, hot! No trees for shade, we could see the heat waves rising up off the barren black roads of the Delta with nothing but farmland as far as you could see. The heat from the black top rose up to bake us, and the sun beating down tried to cook us. “Dante’s Inferno” came to mind as we covered the last 10 miserable miles to our finish line at the Gold Strike Casino.

High fives and cheers all around as we finished the first leg of the MS 150! We guzzled Gatorade and ate sandwiches in outside tents and listened to a band play cover songs from the 80s and 90s.

75 miles down, 75 more to go the next day on Sunday.

Unfortunately, Sunday, September 8, 2013 turned out to be the hottest day of the year.

I can tell you a lot about the first 27 miles of Sunday’s ride. It was flat. And it was hot. That’s it. It’s the Delta. Remember that hill that we rode down coming into the Delta on Saturday? That fun one? Well, it has a big brother further south that you get to climb to get out of the Delta and back into the Highlands. That particular hill is euphemistically known as “The Wall.”

All of the fun of the hill on Saturday is met with an equal amount of misery on Sunday’s climbing of The Wall, which seemingly goes straight up and goes on for about a quarter of a mile or so. It’s the kind of hill that you down shift into your kindest gear – the Granny Gear – and makes you stand up on the pedals, pumping those pedals, shifting your body weight from one pedal to the next, for all you’re worth, hoping that you don’t fall over or roll backwards down the hill. Half of the cyclists have to get off and walk their bikes up The Wall. It’s just that steep. And even at that, the riders who eventually have to walk up the hill arrive at the top exhausted.

The rest of the course on Sunday includes much of the Saturday course but with even more hills! What? MORE HILLS? Or so it seemed. Sometime on Saturday night, I think the “Hill Demons” came out of their lairs and laid out more and more miles of hills for us to climb. Or so it seemed. The rolling hills seemed to have no end, with no shade for cover from the scorching sun.

At about the 55 mile mark on Sunday, my tank started to run empty and I started to feel a “bonk” coming on. “Bonking” is the nickname given for when an athlete runs out of energy, steam, stamina, resolve, motivation, and is completely exhausted, and usually demoralized.

Did I mention that Sunday was the hottest day of the year?

It was 98 degrees and there was no shade from the north Mississippi sun. And minute-by-minute I was being reduced from swagger to stagger. Well, that’s not true. I never really swaggered, but swagger and stagger rhyme and I thought it sounded clever. Anyway, Ashley seemed to be getting her second wind and becoming stronger as I was starting to get weak and fade.

We pushed on, slower than before, as I continued to wither. I’ve bonked before and know the symptoms. Everyone knows some of the first symptoms of catching a cold or the flu. We start to feel those symptoms and hope against hope that the symptoms are just random and that they aren’t the precursor of something worse. The symptoms of bonking are the same. You hope against hope that those feelings will pass and you’ll regain your strength and resolve.

Most endurance athletes have bonked at some point. The more you compete, especially long distances in the heat, the more likely you are to bonk at some point. Bonking is often a result of things you can control, but you neglect or forget. Things like proper nutrition, including carbs and electrolyte replacements for example. An athlete can be properly trained but under-rested, and the bonk can happen because the athlete started the event without sufficient rest. Bonking can happen because the athlete didn’t properly replace the electrolytes in his or her body that are lost through sweat. Bonking can happen when an athlete overheats and the body core temperature redlines and the athlete can’t move forward anymore. Bonking can be the result of heat exhaustion and in some extreme cases, heat stroke.

At mile 68 of the second day, I bonked.

For about the last 13 miles I’d been trying to hold on. I’d tried to drink enough, eat enough, and pace myself enough, but all of the symptoms of the bonk were there: shortness of breath, exhaustion, elevated heart rate, weakness, overheating. By the time Ashley and I got to the last SAG stop, only about 7 miles from the finish, my body was shutting down. I got off my bike, found some shade behind a building, and collapsed.

For the next 45 minutes or so, Ashley packed me down with ice and made me drink more water and Gatorade … and then watched helplessly as all of the muscles in my lower body cramped, like those charley horses you get in your calves in the middle of the night that wake you up and make you scream. All the muscles of my legs cramped simultaneously, along with my abs and some other muscles of my back and arms. I looked like I was having a seizure. It felt like I was having a seizure. I clinched my fists and yelled and tried to get control of my completely rigid body. Ashley elevated my legs and tried to lower my body temperature with plenty of ice. But I couldn’t move at all without more muscles cramping and convulsing. This went on for about 30 minutes.

Maybe this was the time to throw in the towel. Maybe this is it. No shame in covering 143 miles in two days. No need to risk something worse.

Except that I’ve never DNFed in a race or an event. Ever. I’ve finished every race and event I’ve ever entered. Hundreds of races of every kind and distance, from 5ks to full marathons to triathlons to adventure races that lasted more than 48 hours … over decades of competing and not one “Did Not Finish” on my record.

And then there was that little problem with last week’s essay.

Last week I’d praised the efforts of Harriet Anderson and Diana Nyad. I’d written about how those women had, under the most severe circumstances and conditions, reached down deep and “found a way.” They had found a way.

I heard the words of Diana Nyad, “You don’t like it. It’s not going well. Find a way.”

I had to find a way.

After a while, my heart rate slowly dropped to under 80, the muscle cramping and spasms had subsided, and I was finally able to stand up. A few minutes later and I was back on my bike. To be fair to Ashley, she nursed me back to being able to stand up, but she didn’t want me to continue. She could see that I was pale and weak and at the end of my endurance and she urged me to call it a day. But I was stubborn. (Unknown to me at the time, she’d talked to one of the SAG vehicle drivers – a SAG vehicle is a truck that runs sections of a long distance cycling event to ensure that all cyclists are safe, that their bikes are mechanically sound, and that the riders are able to continue – and had arranged for him to follow us to the finish, ready to pull me off the course if I faltered again.) (She’s a keeper!)

With Ashley leading the way, we carried on, covered the last 7 miles, and rode across the finish line together!

There will be some who will read this and say I’m crazy. There are some who’ll read this and say they completely understand.

Is there a take away from this experience? Maybe not. I was properly trained and had taken in the right amount of nutrients. My experience and training and the consultation with the world’s greatest sports nutritionist and dietitian, all indicated that I’d done it right. In retrospect, I probably should have taken a couple of days rest prior to the ride, but given the nature of my work, that didn’t happen. I might have ensured that my electrolyte replacement was more concentrated for the heat and the depletion from day #1. I’ll add these and a few other possible preventions to bonking to my strategic plan and will apply them to the next time.

That’s right. The next time. 😀

— 30 —

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HALF MARATHON TRAINING BEGINS SUNDAY

This coming Sunday, September 15 at 7am!

Meet me in front of the Visitor’s Center at Shelby Farms at 7!

All are welcome, but the prerequisite for being able to do the training is to be able to cover 3 miles in 36 minutes or less. Not sure? Feel free to come out and “kick the tires” with us. Give it a try and see if it will work for you at no risk and no charge.

Cost: $75 for active duty boot campers.
$125 for non-active duty boot campers or “friends of boot camp.”
If you’re running the MRTC Road Race Series, you can still train with me and you can take $30 off the above fee!

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TODAY’S NUTRITION TALK
by Sergeant Ashley Hofeditz, RD LDN,
(An Registered Dietitian has a BS in Food Science, followed by a one year internship through an accredited university, and then with the recommendation of the internship program’s supervisor, a national examination is required. After that, an RD must have continuing education units annually in order to remain active and registered. An RD is an expert, not a hobbyist or a “food enthusiast.”)

Weighing the Pros and Cons of the 5:2 Fasting Diet

The 5:2 fasting diet is the latest diet to hit the market. It has been really popular in the UK and on the west coast. I was just recently asked about it by a boot camper. This diet claims to decrease aging, improve cognitive function, and help people lose weight quickly by sticking to a low calorie diet (500 calories for women and 600 calories for men) two days a week, while eating whatever you want the other 5 days a week. But is this “all you can eat 5 days a week” diet too good to be true? Let’s weigh the pros and cons of the diet.

Pros:

1. Fasting, even intermittently is believed to reduce the levels of IGF-1 a growth hormone in the body that leads to accelerated aging in adults.
2. The benefits of weight loss such as reduced blood pressure, cholesterol, and improved insulin sensitivity usually outweigh the risks of the diet.
3. Fasting intermittently appears to be as effective as an overall daily calorie reduction in helping people to lose weight.
4. Initial animal studies show some promise in the ability of intermittent fasting diets to increase lifespan.
5. You only have to restrict calories two days a week and can eat anything you want the other 5 days.
6. Those that tout the diet say it is simple and easy to follow.

Cons:

1. Eating so little two days a week can cause fatigue, weakness, irritability, anxiety, and sleep problems.
2. The severe calorie and carbohydrate restriction two days a week can be extremely dangerous for diabetics, children, pregnant woman, and those recovering from surgery.
3. Restricting food can lead to nutrient deficiencies if you are not getting all of the vitamins and minerals your body needs.
4. Fasting can leave you with less energy and can make it difficult to function in daily tasks and can affect your ability to concentrate on even the smallest task.
5. A low carbohydrate and energy intake on fasting days and can negatively impact exercise performance and could actually be dangerous.
6. Extreme dieting can lead to overeating and can cause mood swings.
7. Fasting can cause an abnormal obsession with thinking about what and when you are going to eat next. There is concern that this type of diet can lead to disordered eating amongst those who are susceptible.
8. It is doubtful that this diet would be sustainable, since most people would not include fasting in their diet long term.
9. There is a lack of evidence that this diet is safe or effective.

In my opinion, as a Registered Dietitian, this is just another fad diet, another way for people to try and lose weight quickly. However, if you can stick with it for any length of time, you will most likely lose weight, in the short term. And the health benefits of the weight loss will most likely outweigh any risk associated with the diet. That being said, I would give this diet a thumbs down since it is not evidenced based, and the combination of fasting and bingeing could lead to obsessive thoughts about food, mood swings, and low energy levels.

Thank you, Ashley!

———————————————-

If you run with music, turn it down or use only one earbud. I recently bought an excellent single earbud (XDU Noise Isolating Earbud) from Far End Gear http://farendgear.com/xdu/)

———————————————-

GAME DAY T-SHIRTS

College football is BACK!!! Halleluiah!

Every Friday during football season is game day t-shirt day! Wear your alma mater’s colors and paraphernalia on Fridays. If your school doesn’t have a football team or you didn’t make it to college, feel free to adopt any school you like!

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FACEBOOK RESULTS!!!!!!!

WE HAVE OVER 3000 LIKES ON FACEBOOK!

Invite your friends to “like” our USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP Facebook page. You can do that directly from our boot camp page. Just go to the page and you’ll see a section on the right that will allow you to easily invite your friends to like the page. In particular, your Memphis friends!

This may be the first seed to sow in helping a friend get back into exercise and fitness! They can get exposed to what goes on, they’ll be more likely to make a change and maybe even join you on The Quarterdeck!

Encourage your friends and family to “Like” the page! It might motivate your friends and family to take charge of their lives!

Keep on checking in! Keep on tagging your friends!
Thanks, everyone!

——————————————–

DID YOU START USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP IN JUNE, JULY, AUGUST, OR SEPTEMBER 2012 OR EARLIER?

I am asking you veterans to fill out a card – I have them – with your name, number of years of service, and preferred t-shirt size!

————————————–

MAKE A $&(#&@^#!*% FACE!!!!

INCREASE YOUR WEIGHTS!

YOU GET OUT WHAT YOU PUT IN!

What you get out of the workouts is determined by you.

How much do you work? How much effort you put into trying to do all of the repetitions with proper form and how much weight you’re using will determine what you get out of each workout.

YOU DETERMINE WHETHER YOUR WORKOUT IS KICKASS OR NOT!

It’s time for you to go up in weights … that’s what I’m thinking!

MAKING A FACE (THE GRIMACE) IS THE POOR MAN’S (OR WOMAN’S) FACELIFT!

——————————————-

EVERY WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY IS T-SHIRT DAY!

WEAR YOUR RANK INSIGNIA SHIRT, SUB 7 SHIRT, OR OTHER USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP SHIRT!

————————————

SUB SEVEN CLUB!

Members of the Sub-7 Club are Boot Campers who’ve run the mile in under 7 minutes under my observation and timing.

Congratulations to the following members of the Sub Seven Club:

Corporal Lee Chase,
Corporal Chris McLelland,
Staff Sergeant Patrick Moore,
Staff Sergeant Rob Johnston,
Staff Sergeant Andrew Stolnicki,
Gunnery Sergeant Bart Thomas,
Staff Sergeant Dory Sellers,
Gunnery Sergeant Henry Kenworthy,
Master Sergeant John Winford,
First Sergeant Matt Green,
And Sergeant Major Andrew Forsdick.

———————————————-

VETERAN BOOT CAMPERS!

Your rank insignia t-shirts look AWESOME on you! (Don’t forget to wear yours EVERY WEDNESDAY AND/OR THURSDAY, T-SHIRT DAY!

Every Wednesday is our Official BOOT CAMP T-SHIRT DAY! You can wear your rank insignia shirt anytime you‘d like, of course, but always every Wednesday!

The Rank Structure of the Quarterdeck:

Under 6 months is a Private
Six months to 1 year is a Private First Class.

Over 1 year is a Lance Corporal
– ShaWanda Upshaw 10/2011
– Tara Ingram 11/2011
– Pam Torres – meritoriously promoted 12/2012
– Rachel Phillips 2/2012
– Teresa Reed 2/2012
– Alan Compton 4/2012
– Natalie Mannon 5/2012
– Steve Havard 5/2012
– Emma Crystal 5/2012
– Megan Collins 6/2012
– Maria Wyatt 6/2012
– Beth Stengel 2/2012
– Chris Kelley 6/2102
– Susye Clark 7/2012
– Victoria Tigrett 8/2012
– Crystal Bloodworth 8/2012
– Lora Gubanov 8/2012
– Shelia Johnson 8/2012

Over 2 years is a Corporal
– Paul Bauer 11/2010
– Jeremy Harris 1/2009*
– Courtney Phillips 2/2011
– Robin Scott 3/2011
– Chris McLelland 3/2011
– JD Dombroski 4/2011
– Randal Rhea 4/2011
– Cindy King 4/2011
– Sherri Thompson 4/2011
– Becky Lawler 5/2010*
– Carrie Schule 5/2011
– Bevan Lee 5/2011
– Melissa Thompson 5/2011
– Michelle Moss 5/2011
– Mary Bauer 6/2011
– Lee Chase 7/2011
– Tait Keller 8/2011
– Heath Anderson 9/2011
– Lindsey Stanfill 9/2011

Over 3 years is a Sergeant
– Cameron Mosley 11/2009
– Karen Massey 11/2009
– Cecelia DeLacy 2/2010
– Malinda Miller 3/2010
– Ashley Hofeditz 4/2010
– Beth Mills 5/2010
– Emily Melonas 6/2010
– Keith Renard 6/2009*
– Ashley McClure 7/2010
– Falana Scott 7/2010
– Jenni Harris 8/2010
– Anne Marie Wyatt 8/2010
– Tim Romanow 8/2010

Over 4 years is a Staff Sergeant
– Jonathan Phillips 10/2008
– Scott Plunkett 10/2008
– Shena Clemons 10/2008
– Jessie Flanders 1/2009
– Andrew Stolnicki 1/2009
– Ben Killerlain 1/2009
– Paul Tronsor 3/2009
– Teresa Faulk 6/2009
– Sarah Vickers 8/2009
– Robert Hunt 8/2009

Over 5 years is a Gunnery Sergeant
– George Rose 10/2007
– Frank Jemison 10/2007
– Patty Dougherty 3/2008
– Oscar Adams 3/2008
– Patty Dougherty 3/2008
– Rob Johnston 4/2008
– Alan Schaeffer 4/2008
– Buddy Daves 5/2008
– Mike Ryan 5/2006*
– Dory Sellers 6/2006*
– Albo Carruthers 8/2008
– Anne Kenworthy 8/2008
– Patrick Moore 9/2008

Over 6 years is a Master Sergeant
– Kay Ryan 10/2006
– Jeff Lee 1/2006
– Anne Mead 2/2005*
– Michelle Dunn 3/2007
– Henry Kenworthy 5/2007
– Leslie Garey 6/2007
– Beth Rehrig 7/2007
– Matt Prince 8/2007

Over 7 years is a First Sergeant
– Gary Thompson 10/2005
– Scot Bearup 10/2005
– Kay Shelton 1/2006
– Leesa Jensen 5/2006
– Megan Warr 8/2006
– Rob Norcross 8/2006
– Ralph Braden 9/2006

Over 8 years is a Sergeant Major
– Melissa Moore 2/2005
– Louis Glazer 3/2005
– Matt Green 5/2005
– Mike Barta 6/2005*
– Anne Emmerth 6/2005*

Over 9 years is a Warrant Officer 1
– David Townsend 1/2004
– Hank Brown 3/2004
– Andrew Forsdick 9/2004

Over 10 years is a Chief Warrant Officer 2
– Pat McGhee 1/2003
– John Whittemore 1/2003
– Peter Pettit 5/2003
– Buddy Flinn 7/2003
– Amy Singer 9/2003

Battalion Executive Officer
Major Richard Bourland

* broken time

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ARE WE FACEBOOK FRIENDS?

We should be!

HAVE YOU “LIKED” THE USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP FACEBOOK PAGE?

You should totally do that!

———————————–

NEW BOOT CAMP DISCOUNT

If you set up an automatic payment at your bank (Boot Camp mailing address is 4888 Southern, Memphis 38117) you can subtract $10 off your fee! That’s right, instead of $75, you can pay $65!

(This is not an automatic bank draft that I set up with a voided check. This an automatic payment that you yourself set up.)

—————————————

USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP CLASSES – NEW STUFF!

0530 Monday through Friday
(First and second Tuesday of the month are M-16 Workouts at CUMC. Third and fourth Tuesdays are Mt. Fuji Workouts at the U of M)

0645 M-F

5:45 PM: Monday through Thursday, 5:30 on Friday.

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BOOT CAMP DISCOUNTS AND FACEBOOK EXPERIMENT!

First of all, find me on Facebook and make me your friend. (Also, be sure to “like” USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP on Facebook.)

Here’s how the discount works!

It’s simple: make a Facebook status update and get a discount!

For every status update that you make that references:
“USMC Fitness Boot Camp,”
“Sgt. Tony’s Boot Camp,”
“Tony’s Boot Camp,”
or something similar, (there are fake boot camps out there) you can take $2.50 off your next reenlistment fee for each update!

You can take up to $20 off for any given month!

Your status update has to be a specific reference to USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP or to me specifically by name.

BE SURE TO TAG ME!

You can do the same thing by “checking in” at USMC Fitness Boot Camp either by using Facebook “places,” Foursquare, or any of the other “check in” apps that show up on your Facebook News Feed.

So log on and start getting your discounts now!

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CALENDAR

A calendar has been added to the official USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP website.
http://www.usmcfitnessbootcamp.com/calendar.html

For you visual learners, you’ll find this an easy way to glance at the week or month and see where the workouts will be, if there’s a venue change.

—————————————————

Q. How can I get up in the morning on a consistent basis?
A. Contrary to what many think, I am NOT a morning person. I have to be “dynamited” out of the bed! Here are some tips to help you get going in the morning:
1. Use two alarm clocks. I have a snooze alarm that starts going off several minutes before I intend to get up. Then I have a “Last Call” alarm clock that is located across the room. This alarm clock is set to go off when I MUST get up.
2. Once the last call alarm goes off, the bed become OFF LIMITS! Get moving!
3. Get out of bed, turn off the alarm clock, and start turning on lights all through the house. Turn on the TV.
4. Lay out your clothes the night before. Don’t go wandering around the house in the morning trying to find your left shoe and your favorite shorts. So, have things ready the night before.
—————————————–

What would you do if money was not an issue, fear was not a factor, and failure was not an option?

To your optimum health and fitness!

SEE YOU ON THE QUARTERDECK!

Tony

Sergeant Major Tony Ludlow

USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP, Commanding
Mailing address: 4888 Southern Ave., Memphis, TN 38117
Cell Phone: 901-644-0145

Posted by Tony Ludlow | in Uncategorized | No Comments »


Look Out Lew Hollander — Sgt. Tony Ludlow’s blog post for 9/4/2013

Sep. 4th 2013

She looked like hell. No one would deny that. Even she would agree that she looked like hell. But she had every reason to look that way.

Sometimes looking like hell is unavoidable when you’re being a badass.

When I returned from Japan 15 years ago, I joined the faculty and coaching staff of a local private high school. The lexicon of new words added to my vocabulary during those first few months included new phrases I’d never heard before like “participation trophy.”

“I’m sorry, what?”

“Everyone gets a trophy at the end of the season, Coach Ludlow, and you need to order them now,” said the Athletic Director.

I don’t have a learning disability and I’ve got a few degrees from some reputable schools, but I had to have that one explained to me more than twice.

I refused to do it. “Participation trophies?” Why, the very idea!

You wouldn’t believe the fallout.

Parents, teachers, and administrators rose up against me! These folks got really mad at me. But oddly enough, none of the kids got mad at me. See, the kids had been getting those worthless and meaningless “participation trophies” ever since they were 8 years old playing T-ball. Another goofy trophy to clutter up their shelves at home wasn’t going to mean anything to them.

There was no dearness. There was no sense of accomplishment because there had been nothing to celebrate, no accomplishment.

Eventually I had to give up my stand against those ridiculous trophies and buy them. I had to spend good money on stupid participation trophies … just to appease the kids? No, the STUPID adults! The “awards” ceremony was like a bad episode of Oprah. “YOU GET A TROPHY AND YOU GET A TROPHY AND YOU GET A TROPHY!!” Ridiculous. Meaningless.

Today there are terms and adjectives thrown around with no meaning and that have no value or validity. Today, everyone is awesome. Everyone is a badass.

Humbug.

We’re not all created equal. Not by a long shot. Maybe before the law we’re supposed to be equal, but in life, hardly. I can’t dunk, I can’t run as fast as Usain Bolt, and Stephen Hawking laughs at my math skills. I tried-out for the Minnesota Vikings and didn’t make the final cut, though I did manage to stay in the hunt for a few days before I got cut. Once, a 16 year old Lance Armstrong passed me on the bike in a triathlon like I was standing still – he was obviously doing performance enhancing drugs even back then. I yelled, “DRUG USER!” as he blew past me. How else do you explain his ability to pass me?! Oh, you mean we may not have been created equal? I’ve tried to play the guitar for years, but I’ll never play like Leo Kottke, BB King, or Ian Anderson. Or any other professional musician. I know just enough to know how horrible I play. I even know that I should have said “horribly,” but I’m not going to change it.

We aren’t all physically equal and we aren’t gifted with the same mental acumen. But we are all capable of determination, grit, and self-discipline. We’re capable of working hard and accomplishing things through the sheer power of our will and resolve.

But maybe our parents, or our past situations, allowed us to take the easy way out. We learn how to quit too early. We learn how to give up without much of a fight. We don’t have the kind of self-discipline to compensate for what we weren’t born with naturally. We congratulate ourselves for taking the path of least resistance. We learn to settle on mediocrity. We become experts at making excuses for our failures, for our low trajectory, for our underachieving.

I’m not gifted at anything. I’m not particularly smart, nor am I a naturally gifted athlete. I read slowly. I run slowly. I don’t remember any teacher or coach saying, “Tony, you’re really really good at …” (Though my 6th grade teacher did tell my mom that I was the funniest student she’d ever taught.) Everything I’ve done in life has been a result of taking my average ability and adding determination and hard work, self-discipline and an unwillingness to quit or give up.

But none of those things come close to the grit and determination of my two new heroes: Diana Nyad and Harriet Anderson; two women who exemplify the meaning of awesome and bad-ass.

At the age of 74, Harriet Anderson finished the Ironman Triathlon in Hawaii. The Ironman distance race is a 2.4 mile open water swim, followed by a 112 bicycle race, finishing with a full 26.2 mile marathon … in under 17 hours. The race begins at 7am and the participants have until midnight to finish. Hundreds, young and fit, drop out every year. Hundreds, young and fit, don’t finish in time. It can be heart wrenching to watch a triathlete finish that race at midnight plus 1 second. Disqualified and in tears.

Harriet isn’t the oldest to finish that race. That title belongs to 82 year old Lew Hollander. And Harriet, a veteran of all but 3 Hawaii Ironman triathlons since 1989, barely made the 17 hour cut-off that year.

But this is what Harriet did do.

After swimming 2.4 miles in the ocean, fighting other swimmers and the ocean swells; she got on her bicycle and headed out to race the 56 miles to the turnaround. The heat and wind that day forced several to quit. It was just too brutal, they said. On Harriet’s way back from the bike turnaround, and at about the 80 mile mark, some douchebag guy bumped into Harriet and she crashed. (He didn’t even stop to check on her.) Harriet, 74 years old and banged up badly, brushed herself off, got back on her bike, and rode the next 32 miles in pain.

After the bike leg, she could have checked into the medical tent – which would have ensured that a thorough exam would delay her to the point of not giving her enough time to finish the marathon by the midnight cutoff — but Harriet opted instead to get a medical volunteer to patch her up and put her arm in a sling. Then she took off to chase down the marathon.

Harriet finished the race, under the 17 hour cutoff, only then allowing herself to check into the medical tent where personnel discovered that she had broken her clavicle in the crash at the 80 mile mark. She had finished the bike race and run the entire 26.2 mile marathon, banged up and with a broken clavicle.

If you’ve been living in a cave the last few days, then you missed when 64 year old Diana Nyad became the first person to swim from Cuba to Florida without a shark cage. This was her 5th attempt over a 35-year span that included 4 miserable and disappointing failures. She spent 53 hours in the water, fighting fatigue, nausea and constant vomiting, jelly fish, sleep deprivation, salt water, depression, high seas, and a swim mask that cut her tongue and caused her to swallow salt water on just about every stroke.

She looked like hell when 64 year old Diana Nyad walked out of the ocean onto the beach in Florida, completing the 110 miles from Cuba to Florida in 53 hours.

When she was asked what she thought about during those 53 hours, Nyad explained, “You don’t like it. It’s not going well. Find a way.” After 35 years, and 5 attempts, Diana Nyad found a way.

Find a way.

Harriet Anderson and Diana Nyad found ways.

Not blessed with athletic abilities, find a way.
Not blessed with youth, find a way.
Not blessed with great health, find a way.
Not blessed with a great job, find a way.
Not blessed with great intelligence, find a way.
Not blessed with great wealth – or any wealth, find a way.
Not blessed with the means to follow your dreams, find a way.

You don’t like it. It’s not going well. Find a way.

Winners, achievers, and the truly awesome – real badasses – find a way. Everyone else finds an excuse, someone to blame, and a participation trophy.

— 30 —

———————————-

BOGA (– one part boot camp, one part power yoga.) FOR ALL CLASSES TOMORROW!

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TODAY’S NUTRITION TALK
by Sergeant Ashley Hofeditz, RD LDN,
(An Registered Dietitian has a BS in Food Science, followed by a one year internship through an accredited university, and then with the recommendation of the internship program’s supervisor, a national examination is required. After that, an RD must have continuing education units annually in order to remain active and registered. An RD is an expert, not a hobbyist or a “food enthusiast.”)

Clean Eating’s Dirty Little Secrets

“You can lose weight by eating clean!” “The top 5 ways to eat clean.” “Clean eating has changed my life.” “Find out how you can be healthier by eating clean!”

“Clean eating” or “eating clean” seems to be a hot topic these days. I see posts and ads like the ones above all over Facebook, on blogs, in tweets, and even on the news. So if everyone is “eating clean” should you be too? Let’s take a closer look at some of the dirty little secrets surrounding this new health craze.

What the heck is clean eating anyway? The answer actually depends on whom you ask! Just by scrolling through several different web pages on clean eating I was surprised! The vegetarian says you shouldn’t eat meat, the Paleo diet loving power lifter says “clean eating” is not eating grains, the soccer mom says it is avoiding artificial flavorings and additives, the food enthusiast says it is avoiding fruit since it has too much sugar, and the diet guru says it is avoiding gluten since it leads to inflammation. How interesting! Five different websites and five different definitions! Clean eating is whatever these people what to think it is. Therein lies the problem … eating clean has no clear definition! If there is no clear definition of what clean eating is, it can’t really be debated or researched.

“Eating clean” won’t necessarily help you lose weight. Some proponents of “clean eating” seem to think that be eating a certain balance of clean foods will help your metabolism. Or that if you avoid “bad” foods you will burn more fat. Hogwash! Unless you create a calorie deficit (you eat less calories than you burn) you will NOT lose weight!!

“Clean eating” can actually lead to poor nutritional decision-making. When we hear over and over that sugar is bad, that additives cause cancer, that meat rots your stomach or that gluten causes inflammation, these claims can scare us. More than likely the health professionals and food enthusiasts mean well and just want us to cut back on things that they think are not healthy, but messages like these do more harm than good. People who may already be very food conscious may use this information as a way to restrict or avoid even more foods.

Take for gluten for instance. If you hear over and over that gluten causes inflammation and this is why you are overweight, you may become less able to listen to actual legitimate, evidenced based nutritional advice such as “Gluten is perfectly fine for the majority of the population.” But because of your fear, you think that you of course are in the minority and that gluten is bad for you specifically. Fear based decisions are usually not the most rational ones.

Lastly, people that tout their way of clean eating falsely assume that their diet is perfect for everyone. Research shows this just isn’t true. There is no one-way of eating that is right for everyone. Runners need more carbohydrates, weight lifters may require more protein, and others may benefit from a more fiber filled diet. And most of us prefer to eat based on our own personal, regional, and cultural preferences. So following these strict “clean eating “diets can be very limiting and can actually make you pretty unhappy. Like Sweet Brown says, “Ain’t nobody got time fo’ dat!”

Thank you, Ashley!

———————————————-

If you run with music, turn it down or use only one earbud. I recently bought an excellent single earbud (XDU Noise Isolating Earbud) from Far End Gear http://farendgear.com/xdu/)

———————————————-

GAME DAY T-SHIRTS

College football is BACK!!! Halleluiah!

Every Friday during football season is game day t-shirt day! Wear your alma mater’s colors and paraphernalia on Fridays. If your school doesn’t have a football team or you didn’t make it to college, feel free to adopt any school you like!

——————————————–

FACEBOOK RESULTS!!!!!!!

WE HAVE OVER 3000 LIKES ON FACEBOOK!

Invite your friends to “like” our USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP Facebook page. You can do that directly from our boot camp page. Just go to the page and you’ll see a section on the right that will allow you to easily invite your friends to like the page. In particular, your Memphis friends!

This may be the first seed to sow in helping a friend get back into exercise and fitness! They can get exposed to what goes on, they’ll be more likely to make a change and maybe even join you on The Quarterdeck!

Encourage your friends and family to “Like” the page! It might motivate your friends and family to take charge of their lives!

Keep on checking in! Keep on tagging your friends!
Thanks, everyone!

——————————————–

DID YOU START USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP IN JUNE, JULY, AUGUST, OR SEPTEMBER 2012 OR EARLIER?

I am asking you veterans to fill out a card – I have them – with your name, number of years of service, and preferred t-shirt size!

————————————–

MAKE A $&(#&@^#!*% FACE!!!!

INCREASE YOUR WEIGHTS!

YOU GET OUT WHAT YOU PUT IN!

What you get out of the workouts is determined by you.

How much do you work? How much effort you put into trying to do all of the repetitions with proper form and how much weight you’re using will determine what you get out of each workout.

YOU DETERMINE WHETHER YOUR WORKOUT IS KICKASS OR NOT!

It’s time for you to go up in weights … that’s what I’m thinking!

MAKING A FACE (THE GRIMACE) IS THE POOR MAN’S (OR WOMAN’S) FACELIFT!

——————————————-

EVERY WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY IS T-SHIRT DAY!

WEAR YOUR RANK INSIGNIA SHIRT, SUB 7 SHIRT, OR OTHER USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP SHIRT!

————————————

SUB SEVEN CLUB!

Members of the Sub-7 Club are Boot Campers who’ve run the mile in under 7 minutes under my observation and timing.

Congratulations to the following members of the Sub Seven Club:

Corporal Lee Chase,
Corporal Chris McLelland,
Staff Sergeant Patrick Moore,
Staff Sergeant Rob Johnston,
Staff Sergeant Andrew Stolnicki,
Gunnery Sergeant Bart Thomas,
Staff Sergeant Dory Sellers,
Gunnery Sergeant Henry Kenworthy,
Master Sergeant John Winford,
First Sergeant Matt Green,
And Sergeant Major Andrew Forsdick.

———————————————-

VETERAN BOOT CAMPERS!

Your rank insignia t-shirts look AWESOME on you! (Don’t forget to wear yours EVERY WEDNESDAY AND/OR THURSDAY, T-SHIRT DAY!

Every Wednesday is our Official BOOT CAMP T-SHIRT DAY! You can wear your rank insignia shirt anytime you‘d like, of course, but always every Wednesday!

The Rank Structure of the Quarterdeck:

Under 6 months is a Private
Six months to 1 year is a Private First Class.

Over 1 year is a Lance Corporal
– ShaWanda Upshaw 10/2011
– Tara Ingram 11/2011
– Pam Torres – meritoriously promoted 12/2012
– Rachel Phillips 2/2012
– Teresa Reed 2/2012
– Alan Compton 4/2012
– Natalie Mannon 5/2012
– Steve Havard 5/2012
– Emma Crystal 5/2012
– Megan Collins 6/2012
– Maria Wyatt 6/2012
– Beth Stengel 2/2012
– Chris Kelley 6/2102
– Susye Clark 7/2012
– Victoria Tigrett 8/2012
– Crystal Bloodworth 8/2012
– Lora Gubanov 8/2012
– Shelia Johnson 8/2012

Over 2 years is a Corporal
– Paul Bauer 11/2010
– Jeremy Harris 1/2009*
– Courtney Phillips 2/2011
– Robin Scott 3/2011
– Chris McLelland 3/2011
– JD Dombroski 4/2011
– Randal Rhea 4/2011
– Cindy King 4/2011
– Sherri Thompson 4/2011
– Becky Lawler 5/2010*
– Carrie Schule 5/2011
– Bevan Lee 5/2011
– Melissa Thompson 5/2011
– Michelle Moss 5/2011
– Mary Bauer 6/2011
– Lee Chase 7/2011
– Tait Keller 8/2011
– Heath Anderson 9/2011
– Lindsey Stanfill 9/2011

Over 3 years is a Sergeant
– Cameron Mosley 11/2009
– Karen Massey 11/2009
– Cecelia DeLacy 2/2010
– Malinda Miller 3/2010
– Ashley Hofeditz 4/2010
– Beth Mills 5/2010
– Emily Melonas 6/2010
– Keith Renard 6/2009*
– Ashley McClure 7/2010
– Falana Scott 7/2010
– Jenni Harris 8/2010
– Anne Marie Wyatt 8/2010
– Tim Romanow 8/2010

Over 4 years is a Staff Sergeant
– Jonathan Phillips 10/2008
– Scott Plunkett 10/2008
– Shena Clemons 10/2008
– Jessie Flanders 1/2009
– Andrew Stolnicki 1/2009
– Ben Killerlain 1/2009
– Paul Tronsor 3/2009
– Teresa Faulk 6/2009
– Sarah Vickers 8/2009
– Robert Hunt 8/2009

Over 5 years is a Gunnery Sergeant
– George Rose 10/2007
– Frank Jemison 10/2007
– Patty Dougherty 3/2008
– Oscar Adams 3/2008
– Patty Dougherty 3/2008
– Rob Johnston 4/2008
– Alan Schaeffer 4/2008
– Buddy Daves 5/2008
– Mike Ryan 5/2006*
– Dory Sellers 6/2006*
– Albo Carruthers 8/2008
– Anne Kenworthy 8/2008
– Patrick Moore 9/2008

Over 6 years is a Master Sergeant
– Kay Ryan 10/2006
– Jeff Lee 1/2006
– Anne Mead 2/2005*
– Michelle Dunn 3/2007
– Henry Kenworthy 5/2007
– Leslie Garey 6/2007
– Beth Rehrig 7/2007
– Matt Prince 8/2007

Over 7 years is a First Sergeant
– Gary Thompson 10/2005
– Scot Bearup 10/2005
– Kay Shelton 1/2006
– Leesa Jensen 5/2006
– Megan Warr 8/2006
– Rob Norcross 8/2006
– Ralph Braden 9/2006

Over 8 years is a Sergeant Major
– Melissa Moore 2/2005
– Louis Glazer 3/2005
– Matt Green 5/2005
– Mike Barta 6/2005*
– Anne Emmerth 6/2005*

Over 9 years is a Warrant Officer 1
– David Townsend 1/2004
– Hank Brown 3/2004
– Andrew Forsdick 9/2004

Over 10 years is a Chief Warrant Officer 2
– Pat McGhee 1/2003
– John Whittemore 1/2003
– Peter Pettit 5/2003
– Buddy Flinn 7/2003
– Amy Singer 9/2003

Battalion Executive Officer
Major Richard Bourland

* broken time

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ARE WE FACEBOOK FRIENDS?

We should be!

HAVE YOU “LIKED” THE USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP FACEBOOK PAGE?

You should totally do that!

———————————–

NEW BOOT CAMP DISCOUNT

If you set up an automatic payment at your bank (Boot Camp mailing address is 4888 Southern, Memphis 38117) you can subtract $10 off your fee! That’s right, instead of $75, you can pay $65!

(This is not an automatic bank draft that I set up with a voided check. This an automatic payment that you yourself set up.)

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USMC FITNESS BOOT CAMP CLASSES – NEW STUFF!

0530 Monday through Friday
(First and second Tuesday of the month are M-16 Workouts at CUMC. Third and fourth Tuesdays are Mt. Fuji Workouts at the U of M)

0645 M-F

5:45 PM: Monday through Thursday, 5:30 on Friday.

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BOOT CAMP DISCOUNTS AND FACEBOOK EXPERIMENT!

First of all, find me on Facebook and make me your friend. (Also, be sure to “like” USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP on Facebook.)

Here’s how the discount works!

It’s simple: make a Facebook status update and get a discount!

For every status update that you make that references:
“USMC Fitness Boot Camp,”
“Sgt. Tony’s Boot Camp,”
“Tony’s Boot Camp,”
or something similar, (there are fake boot camps out there) you can take $2.50 off your next reenlistment fee for each update!

You can take up to $20 off for any given month!

Your status update has to be a specific reference to USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP or to me specifically by name.

BE SURE TO TAG ME!

You can do the same thing by “checking in” at USMC Fitness Boot Camp either by using Facebook “places,” Foursquare, or any of the other “check in” apps that show up on your Facebook News Feed.

So log on and start getting your discounts now!

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CALENDAR

A calendar has been added to the official USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP website.
http://www.usmcfitnessbootcamp.com/calendar.html

For you visual learners, you’ll find this an easy way to glance at the week or month and see where the workouts will be, if there’s a venue change.

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Q. How can I get up in the morning on a consistent basis?
A. Contrary to what many think, I am NOT a morning person. I have to be “dynamited” out of the bed! Here are some tips to help you get going in the morning:
1. Use two alarm clocks. I have a snooze alarm that starts going off several minutes before I intend to get up. Then I have a “Last Call” alarm clock that is located across the room. This alarm clock is set to go off when I MUST get up.
2. Once the last call alarm goes off, the bed become OFF LIMITS! Get moving!
3. Get out of bed, turn off the alarm clock, and start turning on lights all through the house. Turn on the TV.
4. Lay out your clothes the night before. Don’t go wandering around the house in the morning trying to find your left shoe and your favorite shorts. So, have things ready the night before.
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What would you do if money was not an issue, fear was not a factor, and failure was not an option?

To your optimum health and fitness!

SEE YOU ON THE QUARTERDECK!

Tony

Sergeant Major Tony Ludlow

USMC Fitness BOOT CAMP, Commanding
Mailing address: 4888 Southern Ave., Memphis, TN 38117
Cell Phone: 901-644-0145

Posted by Tony Ludlow | in Uncategorized | No Comments »


Labor Day Schedule

Sep. 1st 2013

We’ll have ONE workout on Labor Day! See you on the Quarterdeck at 7am Monday morning!

Posted by Tony Ludlow | in Uncategorized | No Comments »


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